Workshops

The 15th Annual Diversity Leadership Conference

Sam Houston State University

Complete Workshop Schedule

Saturday, February 16, 2019

 

DLC Workshop Session I: 10:40 - 11:30 AM 

Disability Etiquette: Equity and Excellence in Student Interactions
Presented by Kristin Cole & Morgan Lutz
Workshop Tracks: Identity Development
Location: LSC 230A

This workshop is intended to promote disability awareness, and encourage access and inclusion for all at Sam Houston State University. This session will address how to effectively interact with anyone on campus, including those with visible and invisible disabilities. It will provide information for recognizing and communicating with people with disabilities to foster more respectful work and learning environments. Information will be shared about common myths and misconceptions in an effort to create a positive and collaborative culture for all faculty, staff, and students. Attendees will reflect on their own perceptions of disability, and at the conclusion of the workshop, will be able to combat stereotypes and use language that creates positive impressions of people with disabilities. Disability affects people of all ages and at all level of the University, so this session will promote sensitivity for all groups, regardless of age or experience.

Embracing Diversity: Teaching Students from Culturally Diverse Backgrounds (Pedagogical Implications and Strategies)
Presented by Bahia Braktia, Ana Marcela Montengro S., Sekineh Nasiri, Ruengwatthakee Pimrawee
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development | Social Justice
Location: LSC 315

As the world becomes a global village and universities become more culturally diverse  teachers and students must understand each other to reach an optimum level of learning. It is crucial to grasp the different cultural differences each person brings into the classrooms to effectively provide a more culturally responsive instruction that suits students' needs and learning expectations. However  to achieve full understanding  it requires more than language proficiency as sociocultural differences present a bigger challenge for students and teachers alike. As the number of multicultural students is increasing in the United States  teachers must be aware of the diverse worldviews they may have in a classroom  and work toward the understanding of the linguistically and culturally diverse students. By understanding the students' cultural background  and endorsing a culturally responsive pedagogy  teachers can create a classroom culture that motivate students to achieve academic success. This project addresses some of the challenges students from culturally diverse backgrounds face. During the presentation, students will gain knowledge of some of the pedagogical implications and strategies for educators to promote culturally responsive classrooms to effectively approach and embrace the learners' cultural differences during their learning process.

Fostering Inclusion through Leadership Identity Development
Presented by Grace Boland, Christina Engelken & Dr. Salami
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development | Leadership Development Justice
Location: LSC 320

Who am I? What is my purpose? What are my biases? These are all questions effective leaders need to ask themselves so they can foster their own identity as a leader. This positive leadership development is integral to effective and efficient leader-follower relationships. However, leadership development can be a difficult and lifelong process. Research demonstrates that factors such as motivation and support to lead, leadership skills, and reinforcing experiences through inclusion and acceptance of followers promotes development of leadership identity (Gibson et al., 2018). Through this workshop, we will use discussions, activities, and presentations to assist with leadership identity development to foster strong, effective leaders with a focus on inclusion and equity. By the end of this workshop, students will be aware of how to develop their own positive identity as a leader and how they can use constructs such as inclusion, self-regulation, and diversity intelligence to lead effectively. 

Gender Neutral Pronouns & Why They Matter
Presented by Alyssia Gabbard, Kirsten Garcia, Arryn Boone, Carlie Dlouhy
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice
Location: LSC 230B

After this presentation, attendees will be informed of the ways to incorporate inclusive language into their everyday lives. As well as the importance of being aware of others identities and our habits that potentially invalidate them. This experiential workshop will open up conversations about changing pronoun use in our society, as well as others around the world.

Health & Mental Care for Transgender People
Presented by Billie Beard
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development | Leadership Development
Location: LSC 306

The workshop will go over trans related terminology. It will also talk about the challenges that many transpeople experience (housing, employment, health care, family, and discrimination).

How to Prepare Today to be the Transformational Leader of Tomorrow
Presented by Dr. Shani Robinson & Dr. Aneika Simmons
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development
Location: LSC Theater

Utilizing the established framework of transformational leadership, students will become familiarized with the components of this leadership style. These components include: Idealized influence, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation, and individualized consideration. These four areas will be explained and illustrated in a manner that resonates with current college students. Subsequently, after this presentation attendees will: First, recognize the importance of being teachable and coachable. Next, be able to envision their future professional career path, and take the necessary steps that align with that path. Also, be better equipped to solve problems, coupled with the insight to envision the problems that may occur in the future. Last, be able to display the relevant characteristics that are indicative of leadership potential.

Language Loss & the Ethnic Identity of Minorities
Presented by Dr. Enrique Mallen. Dr. Maria Barker, Dr. Ryan Dux
Workshop Tracks: Identity Development
Location: LSC 307

After this workshop, attendees will have knowledge of linguistic issues that affect various ethnic cultures that exist and be able to better understand the dilemma they face; they will be aware of and have the ability to explore their own identity as members of an ethnic group and appreciate the ways in which they are different from members of another and at the same time explore ways they are similar to each other. Finally, they will be able to make a positive influence within their own community to prevent further language loss.

#MeToo? Exploring Inadequate Representation within Mainstream Feminist Social Justice Movements and Eradicating the “All Lives Matter” Approach to Solidarity
Presented by Destiny Caldwell
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development | Leadership Development | Social Justice
Location: LSC 304

In this presentation, participants will learn about the common occurrences of inadequate representation that is exhibited within mainstream social justice initiatives, such as the #MeToo Sexual Assault Movement, global Women's Marches, and celebrity-based platforms. These movements and events often exclude women of color in various ways: they are left out of important conversations regarding their rights, and they are undermined and neglected (both in terms of their experiences and their very existence). These instances of exclusion reinforce a “self-serving” approach to feminism that mostly benefits privileged groups. By taking a research-based approach to the harms and dangers of divided "unity" movements, participants will be able to understand and adopt wholly inclusive perspectives required to become better activists and advocates for individuals of all backgrounds.

Sick and Tired of being Sick and Tired: How Racial Battle Fatigue Manifests at PWIs and How to Cope
Presented by Megan Richardson & Brittani Clarkson
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice | Identity & Personal Development
Location: LSC 242

The term "racial battle fatigue" was coined to describe the psychophysiological symptoms people of color may experience when navigating historically white spaces. This workshop will explore how racial battle fatigue may manifest itself in the daily lives of students of color at predominantly white institutions as well as introduce healthy coping mechanisms to empower and support those who experience it. Learning Outcomes:

1) Participants will be able to identify what racial battle fatigue is

2) Participants will be able to identify how macro- and micro- aggressions can lead to the manifestation of racial battle fatigue in the daily lives of people of color

3) Participants will be able to identify traditional coping methods for racial battle fatigue and the resulting negative physiological and psychological effects

4) Participants will be able to identify alternative strategies to help cope with the stress response induced by racial battle fatigue

The Art of Code Switching
Presented by Ricardo Antelo & Lucero Nava
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: LSC 110

This workshop will cover the who, what, when, where, and why of code switching in an inclusive environment. After this presentation, attendees will be able to recognize the benefits of code switching as it applies to themselves and the environment around them.

DLC Workshop Session II: 11:40 AM - 12:30 PM

Blending In, Standing Out: Surviving and Thriving as a Study Abroad Student of Color
Presented by Malin Hilmersson & Dana Van De Walker
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: LSC 110

In this panel session, students will hear perspectives from SHSU study abroad alumni and learn about their experiences as study abroad students of color. Students will learn how to prepare themselves for study abroad opportunities, deal with cultural differences regarding race and ethnicity, and identify coping mechanisms to help them survive and thrive abroad. This session will provide a safe space for students to discuss their experiences, challenges, and hopes for study abroad. 

Deaf Culture 101
Presented by Tracy Knight & Jose Velasquez
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: LSC 307

Attendees will gain knowledge of identity of Deaf people, communication access, technology, proper terminology used in Deaf culture, genetics, audism, myths and many more.

Don’t Put Your Expectations On Me: From Stereotypes to Prophecy
Presented by Blaine Cordova, Anna Abate, Jeeva Babu, Jorge Varela, Temilola Salami
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development | Advisor/Graduate Student
Location: LSC 242

This workshop addresses issues surrounding stereotype threat, an especially salient problem for minority students (e.g., ethnic, sexual, gender, disabled) in the university setting. The workshop will include an informative presentation through which attendees will gain knowledges on research surrounding the effects of stereotype threat (e.g., lowered academic performance) and its multidisciplinary implications, which may be especially relevant for attendees of varying academic and/or vocational backgrounds (e.g., education, criminal justice, psychology). In addition, the workshop will include an activity that will ask participants to place sticky notes on their foreheads that will have prewritten stereotypic attributes (e.g., angry, lazy, good at math) and interact with other attendees. Participants will talk about their future goals and will be told to treat others according to the stereotypic attribute assigned to them. After this presentation, attendees will be able to recognize the effects that stereotype threat poses for minority students in a university setting as well as the implications in vocational settings that may foster change through awareness. In particular, the presentation seeks to raise this awareness in students who will be entering the workforce in order to reduce its prevalence in the future.

Getting In Our Own Way: The Degradation of Student Organizations
Presented by Johnny Brownlee II
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development
Location: LSC 321

Across the nation, our student organizations are struggling and student governments are struggling. Many seem to be on their last leg, past their prime, obsolete etc. Organizations don’t have the activism and sacrifice of students from the 60’s and 70’s, drive of the 80’s, survival skills of the 90’s or money and participation of orgs form the early 2000’s. We seek to see if it’s a generational problem or are other factor the problem. We examine 6 sinister problems that are costing student organizations funding, stability, sustainability, etc. We’re often taught how to be good leaders, but never how to run good organizations, revive them or save them from peril. Session goal: To figure out what factors are currently costing us members, stability, funding, involvement and respect of our former members, founders, elders and in some cases our institutions. We aim to find out is it a generational problem, educational, or do we take the power, prestige, and responsibility of student organizations and student involvement for granted. We’ll also identify 6 major problems facing our organizations and learn to identify them and combat them. We’ll learn how to get diversity, inclusion, representation, funding, respect and cooperation so that we can take our organizations to levels not even imagined

How Much of Me Should I Be?: Assimilation in the Workplace
Presented by Jaila Moore
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: LSC 304

Attendees will learn how to be themselves while being professional in the workplace. This workshop will help participants define terms such as culture, prejudice, stereotype, microaggression, Equal Employment Opportunity Act and others. After this presentation, attendees will also be able to facilitate conversations about diverse and difficult topics. 

Know Yourself: How Self Awareness Can Lead to Better Leadership
Presented by Akilah Smith & Precious Lord
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development
Location: LSC 315

The goal of this workshop is to help attendees understand the importance of Social and Emotional Intelligence in daily life. According to Dr. Laura Belsten “Social and Emotional Intelligence is the ability to understand and manage your own emotions, and those of the people around you.” We will explore four skills: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and social skills, which our participants can immediately apply to leadership positions.

LGBTQ Sex Ed
Presented by Billie Beard
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice | Identity & Personal Development
Location: LSC 306

Growing up I did not have a single class that talked about LGBT and safe sex practices. Students will learn about the male and female organism,  how to practice safe sex, consent,  open exploration of their partners and their body. They will also learn sex acts that empower transgender,  gender non-binary, and intersex people.

Self Love
Presented by Ashlin Monk
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development | Identity & Personal Development
Location: LSC 319

After this presentation, attendees will find new meanings on what it actually means to love themselves.

Service Members Among Us: Military Culture In and Out of the Classroom
Presented by Joshua Camins, Christina Brooks, Joshua Francis, Brittany Ridge
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: LSC 230A

This workshop will provide an overview of military culture with a specific emphasis on understanding common issues faced, myths associated with military service, and how to appropriately interact with veterans in a variety of situations. At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to describe key features of military culture. Attendees will learn information pertaining to the following elements.

  1. Introduction to military culture: Facts, Figures and a Day in the Life
  2. Medical and mental health needs and resources for veterans
  3. Military and veteran suicide: Risk factors and ways to prevent suicide
  4. Cultural considerations in interactions with veterans: Challenges and myths     
  5. At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to understand cultural nuances that impact the way veterans interact with civilians across contexts. This workshop provides a special focus on ways to support the veteran community for non-mental health providers.
The Difference Between Hispanic, Latino & Latinx
Presented by Emily Ramirez, Stephanie Escamilla, Elena Munguia, Ismael Alvarez & Myriam Palacios
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: LSC 230B

Attendees will gain knowledge of the difference between Latino/Latinx/Hispanic. This information can help people be more culturally aware and benefit them about the importance of how common this topic is used in social and professional settings. After this presentation, attendees will be able to understand the correct terminology to refer to others in the respective manner, which can help in a professional or personal level.

The Intersectional Self: Opening the Narrative of Identities
Presented by Kelci Davis, Jennifer Boland, Dr. Craig E. Henderson
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: LSC Theater

The goal of this workshop is to provide attendees an opportunity to explore Kimberle' Crenshaw's Intersectionality Theory in the context of their own lives. This theory highlights how a single individual has many identities, some of which may be privileged or marginalized. Attendees will learn how to examine the different aspects of their identities (e.g., heritage, ability, wealth) and how to reflect on both their privilege and marginalization from a holistic standpoint. After attendees engage in this reflection, we will use their insight to guide a discussion on how our own identities can be used to appreciate others' identities. This discussion will provide attendees with a foundation for personal insight and stimulate honest dialogues. There will be four parts of this discussion:

  1. reflection on socialization experiences,
  2. events that contribute to oppression/prejudice,
  3. ways to hold honest dialogues about identity, and
  4. strategies for reconciliation and healing.

Through shared reflection, participants will work with the presenters to create their own ideas about each topic, and how they can integrate these topics into their lives. From this presentation, attendees will gain individual, interpersonal, and societal insight into how their identities impact their views of themselves and their interactions with others.

What is Islamophobia?
Presented by Ka’Darius Ross, Dr. Siham Bouamer, Alexis Uhl
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice
Location: LSC 320

This presentation will cover what Islamophobia is, explain the history of events that led up to 9/11, and break down the stereotypes and misconception of Muslims. We will explain the true definition of Islamophobia and how it has effected people within the Muslims community. The history of events will include all of the events that resulted in 9/11 and as well as post 9/11. We will address the stereotypes placed on people of the Muslim community. We plan on encouraging people to stop the suppression of this community in general, along with ways to identify common cases of islamophobia that would normally be overlooked.

DLC Workshop Session III: 2:00 - 2:50 PM

Behind the Curtain – Embracing Your True Self to Inspire Others
Presented by Rafael Matos
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development
Location: LSC Theater

We are conditioned to believe that our credentials are measure of our success, so much that sometimes we focus our energies on securing external validation. Whether college degrees, job titles or accolades, these status markers shape our identities and become the definition of our existence. But what happens when we no longer have these status symbols? These are questions Rafael faced and found answers in an unlikely place – a middle school art classroom. In this workshop, Rafael guides students through a journey of self-discovery to answer the question, “Who am I?” Students will gain skills to help them identify, articulate and utilize their humanity to live more meaningful and purposeful lives that are inspire others.

Learning Outcomes

As a result of attending this program, attendees will learn:

  • How to differentiate between internal and external validation
  • How to articulate individual characteristics that can help other people
  • How to find internally-driven self confidence
Boss Up!
Presented by Brandon Abadom & Andrew Sampson
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development | Identity & Personal Development
Location: LSC 307

In this workshop, we will be providing attendees with the skills and tips to enhance their personal development, as well as leadership skills. Self-identification, niche, and roles will be emphasized. We will also have a discussion on networking on building your own brand. Attendees will be able to interact with others in the workshop through an icebreaker. After this presentation, we are hoping attendees will have a clear understanding of personal development and the skills needed to lead others.

Cultural Plunges: A Holistic Discussion on Implementing Cultural Trainings
Presented by Tessa Long, Betsy Galicia, Joshua Francis, Jorge Varela
Workshop Tracks: Advisor/Graduate Student
Location: LSC 315

Cultural plunges, also known as cultural immersions, have recently gained popularity in training programs as a way to promote self-awareness and increase cultural sensitivity among its trainees (Nieto, 2006). This method of training “plunges” individuals into unfamiliar environments to expose them to different cultural contexts (e.g. ethnic, linguistic, physical ability, and/or socioeconomic status). Common examples of these brief cultural experiences include, but are not limited to: attending services at African American churches, attending church services in a different language, interacting with homeless people, or interacting with people with disabilities (Nieto, 2006). Afterwards, training programs typically include a component involving self-reflection of trainees’ experiences through a subsequent group discussion or a written assignment. Before implementing cultural plunges as a component of training, there are potential outcomes (both positive and negative) for both individual trainees and specific cultural communities which should be considered. By attending the workshop, individuals will gain knowledge on the nuances of cultural plunges, learn about real-life cultural plunge experiences and better understand how to effectively implement cultural plunges in their respective training programs. Overall, the workshop aims to highlight specific considerations when implementing cultural plunges and to inform program administration of culturally-sensitive cultural plunge techniques.

Diversity Learning + Active Inclusion
Presented by Cesar Rivera
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development | Advisor/Graduate Student 
Location: LSC 320

Diversity & Inclusion (D+I) is an important goal for many universities. Institutions consider D+I when they talk about student and faculty recruitment. Additionally, a wave of pedagogical learning is sweeping across campuses all over the nation, Active Learning. Active Learning helps students gain information in new and interesting ways. Active Learning enhances educational proficiencies when the diversity of student knowledge is recognized and incorporated into classroom activities. When that kind of D+I are practiced in educational settings, students can feel their opinions valued. After this presentation, attendees will have a better understanding of the impact Active Learning practices can have on the D+I in their classrooms and on education as a whole. Attendees will also participate in a few Active Learning activities that they can immediately implement in their daily learning environments.

Getting In Our Own Way: The Degradation of Student Organizations
Presented by Johnny Brownlee II
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development
Location: LSC 321

Across the nation, our student organizations are struggling and student governments are struggling. Many seem to be on their last leg, past their prime, obsolete etc. Organizations don’t have the activism and sacrifice of students from the 60’s and 70’s, drive of the 80’s, survival skills of the 90’s or money and participation of orgs form the early 2000’s. We seek to see if it’s a generational problem or are other factor the problem. We examine 6 sinister problems that are costing student organizations funding, stability, sustainability, etc. We’re often taught how to be good leaders, but never how to run good organizations, revive them or save them from peril. Session goal: To figure out what factors are currently costing us members, stability, funding, involvement and respect of our former members, founders, elders and in some cases our institutions. We aim to find out is it a generational problem, educational, or do we take the power, prestige, and responsibility of student organizations and student involvement for granted. We’ll also identify 6 major problems facing our organizations and learn to identify them and combat them. We’ll learn how to get diversity, inclusion, representation, funding, respect and cooperation so that we can take our organizations to levels not even imagined We not only discuss how to grow a large membership, and obtain a large budget, but how to make a deep impact on your campus, through your events, outreach, co-sponsorships, purpose and causes regardless the size of the organization.

Inclusion, Acceptance, and Bumps along the Road
Presented by Beata Krembuszewski, Emma Anderson-White, Grace Boland, Lauren Blossom, Mya Walker
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice
Location: LSC 230A

As we become more cognizant of the persistent racism and discrimination that is still rampant in our country, we must also consider subtle prejudice. Many of us self-proclaimed social justice advocates strive to be more inclusive of interpersonal differences by being understanding and compassionate toward the experiences of racism and discrimination. But what happens when we make a mistake? How do we know if we have used a microaggression? What do we do when we unintentionally microaggress towards someone? How should we respond if we say something that is inadvertently offensive or invalidating? Through the use of interactive scenarios and role-playing, we will typify microaggressions and pose potential solutions to prepare you for situations where you have accidentally used a microaggression or other offensive language. We will also provide advice for individuals on how to be more inclusive and accepting when interacting with diverse groups of people. After attending this workshop, students will have a heightened awareness for microaggressions and other offensive language and will be prepared to appropriately respond if they misstep.

Queer Abroad: Surviving and Thriving as an LGBTQ* Study Abroad Student
Presented by Malin Hilmersson & Dana Van De Walker
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: LSC 110

In this panel session, students will hear perspectives from SHSU study abroad alumni and learn about their experiences as LGBTQ* study abroad students. Students will learn how to prepare themselves for study abroad opportunities, deal with cultural differences regarding sexual orientation and gender identity, and identify coping mechanisms to help them survive and thrive abroad. This session will provide a safe space for students to discuss their experiences, challenges, and hopes for study abroad.

Self-Promotion in the Digital Age
Presented by Max Walling & Brittni MacLeod
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development
Location: LSC 230B

As we move deeper into the digital age, an increasing amount of activities that were once exclusively done face-to-face are now taking place in digital formats. As the advent of social media has changed how we interact socially, it is also changing how we professionally brand ourselves and network with others. In this session, we will examine the current social media landscape, present data on how recruiters across the country are utilizing social media in hiring processes, and provide a list of social media best practices for professionals looking to promote themselves and connect with others.

Understanding Yourself and Others for Effective Leadership: An Introduction to Personality, Paradigms, and Boundaries
Presented by Vickie Holmes
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development | Leadership Development
Location: LSC 304

After this presentation, attendees will be able to recognize their own personality type, paradigms, and boundaries. Attendees will learn how to recognize and honor the corresponding differences in others through effective communication and leadership.

What Would You Do?
Presented by Norely Sanchez & Olivia Espinoza
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice
Location: LSC 242

The attendee will gain knowledge of how to properly react in a situation facing racism comments in a public space. In today society our country has reach a point were individuals believe it's okay to treat minorities inferior due to their upbringing, ethnicity, and believes. Before moving to our plan we would show videos of similar situations and ask for people to give ideas about who to address the situation. In this workshop we will learn a 3 step plan to asses a situation in which a another person is being treated unfair for their upbringing, ethnicity and religion. The first step is intervene the situation in a calm, respectful manner. Step 2 record the event. Step 3 call for help. When dealing with a situation like that it???s important to not escalate the situation and always treat each person with respect.