Workshops

DIVERSITY LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2020

WORKSHOP SESSIONS I: 3:00 – 3:50 PM 

A Multicultural Approach to Mental Health
Presented by Cayla Hari, Jasmine Phillips, Debbie Torres, Dr. Jorge Varela
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice, Leadership Development, Advisor/Graduate Student
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 135

Racial, ethnic, sexual, and gender minorities have lower rates of mental health care use, access, and quality service leading to higher rates of poor health outcomes. However, racial and ethnic minorities are more susceptible to developing certain types of psychopathologies, specifically depression and PTSD. Generally, there is an increase in mental health problems among LGBTQ+, racial, and ethnic minorities. In order to lessen the impact of sociocultural and environmental factors on mental health in minority populations, it is imperative to know what defines and encompasses mental health. The aim of this presentation is to discuss intersectional identities as they influence and are influenced by mental health and contextual factors. We will provide information about mental health identification, current health disparities, enhancing mental health wellness factors, and cultural awareness in treatment.

Changing the Narrative: Using Digital History to Promote Diversity and Inclusion
Presented by Dr. Jeff Littlejohn, April OBrien
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice, Identity and Personal Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 336

In order to promote diversity and inclusion on campus and in our community, we must first come to terms with the role that racial violence and discrimination have played in the past. Only then can we engage in an honest discussion about the roots of current inequalities and how to remedy them. In this workshop, two professors of digital history will share online tools and websites that may help participants change the narrative of Texas history and make it more diverse and inclusive.

Focus on What’s Right with People
Presented by Brian Weaver, Gabby Sauceda
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 134

After this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  • Describe and discuss what it means to focus on a mentality centered on building strengths rather than fixing weaknesses.
  • Investigate what their strengths are and how they could practice those strengths on a daily basis.
  • Construct a plan for implementing positive change within any group setting.
#MeToo: Affecting Campus Culture through Awareness Campaign
Presented by Dr. Siham Bouamer, Evangelina Covarrubias
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 138

Students from the Honors Dialogue Seminar will present their community outreach projects they created for the class. After this presentation, you will be able to reflect on ways to bring awareness about the #MeToo campuses. The presenters will:

  • present the current resources available on campus
  • describe their projects
  • engage attendees on possible outreach projects that they could do
Multiple Heritage Identity Development
Presented by Dr. Richard Henriksen, Ashley Daniels
Workshop Tracks: Identity Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 335

There are many models of identity develop that focus on those who identify with a single racial or ethnic identity. There are also identity development models that focus on gender identity, religious/spiritual identity, and sexual orientation to name a few. However, those models do not apply to those who have multiple racial/ethnic and other identities nor do they focus on the integration of multiple identities. We will present the history of miscegenation, the Loving v. Virginia US Supreme Court decision, the Multiple Heritage Identity Development (MHID) model, and apply the model to those with multiple heritage identities. At the conclusion of this workshop, attendees will have learned the process by which those with multiple heritage backgrounds go through in the development of a multiple heritage identity. Attendees will also have learned how the MHID theory is applied and used to help those with multiple heritage identities with the identity development process. Finally, attendees will have learned the many labels multiple heritage individuals use to self-identify that also allow them to celebrate all aspects of their backgrounds.

SHSU Campus Climate Report: Political Learning & Engagement
Presented by Steven Koether
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development 
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 133

Attendees will evaluate the SHSU Campus Climate Report, pertaining to political learning and engagement. The report was conducted by a diverse coalition of students, staff, faculty, and administration. It is both an assessment by the coalition of existing structures and services as well as qualitative data deriving from campus focus groups. Ultimately, this data will help participants better understand the campus and make informed decisions about items we should be celebrating and next steps for areas needing growth. The project was conducted with a larger group of 12 universities across the nation. It was funded, organized, and supported by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) and the Institute for Democracy & Higher Education (IDHE) out of Tufts University.

Study Abroad Diversity Panel: Experiences from Abroad
Presented by Tea Todman, Malin Hilmmersson, Elise Whatley
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 331

This workshop will showcase Study Abroad Alumni who stem from diverse backgrounds, ethnicities, cultures, and LGBTQ communities. Students will impart on their experiences studying abroad by discussing the challenges and benefits during their time overseas. This select panel of SHSU Study Abroad Alumni will provide prospective study abroad students with important tools, advice, and tips to gain more knowledge about study abroad. After this presentation, attendees will be able to understand the importance of the inclusion of all student's participation in study abroad.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2020

WORKSHOP SESSION II: 4:30 - 5:20 PM

Affirmative Action: Are We Solving or Creating a Problem?
Presented by Beata Krembuszewski, Emma Anderson-White, Dr. Craig E. Henderson, Katherine Lewis, Lauren Ryan
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice, Advisor/Graduate Student
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 341

Our presentation will provide a historical analysis and contemporary view of affirmative action. In this presentation, we define affirmative action as the practice of using membership in a historically disadvantaged group as a factor when making decisions regarding employment or higher education admissions for the purpose of combatting the historical and ongoing effects of societal discrimination. We will briefly discuss landmark Supreme Court cases that set the precedent for affirmative action and its current status. Affirmative action policies will be discussed in multiple contexts, including employment opportunities, admissions to higher education programs, and recent Supreme Court rulings, some of which have been based in Texas. Our presentation will also cover the positive and negative consequences of affirmative action, provide the audience with factual information based on scientific research about this historically controversial topic, and illustrate best practice guidelines for its use. Lastly, we will suggest potential remedies to some of the current controversies and how the principles of affirmative action may be enacted to promote societal benefit in the future. Affirmative action is often poorly understood and misinterpreted, but after attending this presentation, the audience will be better informed about the underlying rationale and realistic application of this policy.

Creating Inclusive Cultures on Campus: A "How To" for Campus Leaders
Presented by NuNicka Epps, Mi'cah Ducros
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development, Advisor/Graduate Student
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 335

In this session, we will demonstrate how inclusive behaviors are cultivated with a shift in mindset, an openness to change, and a willingness to embrace and value the unique contributions of others. Diversity means nothing without inclusion and inclusive behaviors. This session will provide participants with helpful strategies to cultivate inclusive environments on campus and will highlight the leadership characteristics required to improve the college experience for all.

Leadership and Action: Next Steps Using the SHSU Campus Climate Report on Political Learning and Engagement
Presented by Steven Koether
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 133

Attendees will make use of the data found in the SHSU Campus Climate Report on political learning and engagement. While we can (and will) ask entities across campus to do better, the point of this session is to engage participants in introspection. How can we do better? What power do we hold and how do we wield it? This session will begin with a brief look at campus data and examples for how entities are already making changes to be more inclusive and transparent in their decision making. The process is not easy and requires work. The session will end by asking participants to commit to actions that will improve the SHSU campus climate toward political learning and engagement. The larger endeavor is part of a national initiative. The project and report were funded, organized, and supported by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) and the Institute for Democracy & Higher Education (IDHE) out of Tufts University.

Minorities in the Workforce
Presented by Melissa Orellana, Elena Munguia
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice, Leadership Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 331

After this presentation, attendees will have knowledge on how to handle real life situations in the workforce. Additionally, attendees will be able to relate and understand how minorities in the workforce feel and go through in their eyes.

The Road to 2020
Presented by Dani Carpio, Morgan Shiflett, Jordan Davis
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 338

Attendees will gain the knowledge of how understanding their voting rights and resources can change the world we live in. At the end of the workshop, attendees should be empowered to go out and vote while encouraging others to do the same.

Surviving the animosity surrounding the #MeToo Movement
Presented by Kimberly Moore
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development 
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 138

The #MeToo Movement was empowering for survivors of sexual assault. It brought us together and shined a light on how many people have been affected by sexual assault in our country. The movement started conversations about consent, changing legislation, holding perpetrators accountable, and ending the epidemic of sexual assault on college campuses and the work place. Although the recent empowerment of activism is overwhelming, there are still nay-sayers. We hear and see victim blaming and accusations of false reports on a regular basis. If we are going to continue to combat rape culture as well as create new legislation to protect survivors, we need to take care of ourselves. It is important we don't become silent. This workshop will focus on self-care and how to remain calm during high profile cases (like the Judge Kavanaugh hearing last year). Participants will identify the different archetypes they have inside and learn how to bring them forward and feel powerful. After identifying their archetype, participants will create a visual of their archetype as a reminder to pull that "person" forward when in a difficult situation. Finally, participants will leave with a list of self-care activities to use.

Teaching Intersectionality through Interactive Exercises
Presented by Dr. Jeffrey Gardner, Samantha Rust, Celestina Olguin, Annalisa Vazquez, Linda Aniweta, Jayla Perry, Ashley Freydenfeldt, Virginia Barron Lopez
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development, Advisor/Graduate Student 
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 336

Intersectionality is a useful analytic concept that addresses how inequalities may overlap to create unique forms of privilege and subjugation (Crenshaw 1989, 1991; Hill Collins 2009; Hill Collins and Bilge 2016). However, intersectionality is a perplexing concept for students to grasp (Naples 2009). A critical challenge for students in the classroom is learning to understand how intersecting forms of inequality have material consequences for people in their everyday lives (rather than treating intersectionality as merely an abstract academic concept). To address this issue, our workshop will present and invite the participation of attendees in an interactive activity designed to help students understand intersectionality in a way that is complex and embodied. Through participation in this workshops' interactive activity, attendees will learn useful ways for teaching and learning about intersectionality. Specifically, the interactive activity will demonstrate that intersectionality is a useful analytic concept that captures how different aspects of domination overlap, creating unique experiences with privilege and subjugation for those in different societal positions.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2020

WORKSHOP SESSION III: 10:40 - 11:30 AM

Culturally Responsive Teaching
Presented by Leyla Fandey
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development, Advisor/Graduate Student
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 336

Participants will identify characteristics of culturally responsive teaching (CRT) as well as strategies to design and implement culturally responsive instruction.  Additionally, participants  will be able to distinguish between CRT, multi-cultural education and restorative justice education. 

Disability Etiquette: Equity and Excellence in Student Interactions
Presented by Morgan Lutz
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 133

This workshop is intended to promote disability awareness, and encourage access and inclusion for all at Sam Houston State University. This session will address how to effectively interact with anyone on campus, including those with visible and invisible disabilities. It will provide information for recognizing and communicating with people with disabilities to foster more respectful work and learning environments. Information will be shared about common myths and misconceptions in an effort to create a positive and collaborative culture for all faculty, staff, and students. Attendees will reflect on their own perceptions of disability, and at the conclusion of the workshop, will be able to combat stereotypes and use language that creates positive impressions of people with disabilities. Disability affects people of all ages and at all level of the University, so this session will promote sensitivity for all groups, regardless of age or experience.

First-Generation College Students: Improving Academic Success, Mental Health, and Institutional Resources
Presented by Betsy Galicia, Maxwell Christensen, Tessa Long, Jorge Varela
Workshop Tracks: Advisor/Graduate Student
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 135

First-generation college students (FGCSs), those whose parent or guardian did not complete a Bachelor's degree, comprised approximately one third of the national undergraduate population in the 2011-12 academic year (National Center for Education Statistics, 2018). FGCSs represent a diverse population in terms of demographics and mental health needs, with cumulative, adverse factors increasing their risk for potential distress (House, Neal, & Kolb, 2019). Challenges for FGCSs include having less college readiness (Postsecondary National Policy Institute [PNPI], 2018), less social support, lower economic resources, and higher drop-out rates (Becerra, 2017; PNPI, 2018). The proposed workshop will focus on discussing three main topic areas: 1) existing research literature on FGCSs in the United States, 2) potential challenges related to their academic success, mental health, and professional development, and 3) recommendations for university stakeholders to improve FGCS outcomes. By attending this workshop, participants will gain knowledge of FGCS experiences, discuss interactions between FGCS identities and broad university systems, and learn potential strategies for improving student experiences through mentorship, outreach, community support, and additional resources. This workshop aims to facilitate increased awareness of diverse FGCS experiences and improve culturally-sensitive practices among university stakeholders.

It's Conference, Not Carnival!
Presented by Johnny Brownlee II
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice, Leadership Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 341

Its Conference, Not Carnival is a spinoff of the Book and workshop Getting In Our Own Way: The Degradation of Student Organizations. We seek to reverse this trend and thought process of administrations not seeing the value of conferences and students not focusing on the right aspects of conference, by teaching students to treat conference as a business trip; teaching them how to masterfully work the conference so that they focus on the right things, develop and can be trusted and encouraged to go to conferences. As students attending a conference is a privilege, not a birthright. To teach students how to maneuver through a conference and return to campus revived, inspired and full of new ideas, techniques, and information to improve their student organizations, activism, and leadership skills. They are taught things to do before a conference, during the conference and immediately upon returning to campus to make conference affordable, enjoyable, beneficial and to build trust with the student government/ administration.

Leadership through the NUPE lens
Presented by Jordan Mulkey, Louis Butler, James Washington, Antoine Gholson
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development 
Location: LSC (Lowman Student Center) Room 230A

Attendees will be able to gain knowledge of how to be an effective leader in different situations and environments while also learning how to identify a leader and how to assign roles to others.

Leading While Black
Presented by Dr. Anthony Harris
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice, Leadership Development 
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 338

After this presentation, attendees will have a better understanding of the challenges that black leaders face in predominantly white organizations. The metaphors and prototypes of The Rubber Band Man, The Lone Ranger, The High Jumper, The Invisible Man, The Obama Effect and the Colin Kaepernick Effect will be used to explain those challenges and obstacles. Moreover, there will be a discussion of how historical and contemporary white supremacy and racism have impacted the role and effectiveness of black leaders in white organizations.

The Ultimate Guide to Self-Identity in College
Presented by Mariah Hardy, Alexus Uhl
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 134

We hope to establish what self-understanding is and the importance it holds on the development and growth of young people. We want to educate the benefits of having a good self-understanding for college students, which include: enriched emotional intelligence, improved critical thinking, better communication and relationships, and enhanced leadership qualities. We want to teach others ways to develop better self-understanding and how to utilize these skills after college. Our ultimate goal is for students and attendees to learn new ways to develop themselves as students and humans.

“WOKEish” – Building Cultural Competence, Moving from Concept to Action
Presented by Jimez Ashby
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 138

A forum to unpack the concept of "Wokeness" and lay foundation to understanding Cultural Competence in order to create action. The objectives and learning outcomes for this sessions are:

  • Provide a holistic understanding of the concept "Wokeness" using literature and social context for application within social movements
  • Explore identity from an intersectional lens, while prompting introspection to work towards inclusive communities
  • Equip persons with tools and framework to create sustainable action plans for activism across spaces and on various levels

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2020

WORKSHOP SESSION IV: 11:40 AM - 12:30 PM

Advocating the Importance of the Latinx Vote: How you can develop Leadership in the Voting Process
Presented by Christie Padron, Danielle Carpio
Workshop Tracks: Leadership Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 135

Students will become aware of the importance and weight of the Latinx vote in the upcoming presidential election to enable them to share their findings. In addition, attendees will learn how to be proactive community leaders in the election process, for example by promoting the social change that can be obtained through voting or helping other minorities' members to become community leaders.

Approaching the Internet’s Language Diversity Problem
Presented by Dr. Enrique Mallen
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 331

How does language affect one's experience of the internet? For those who cannot speak or understand English, much of the internet is in fact out of reach. Native English speakers' around 5% of the global population - are probably not aware since English and nine other languages account for nearly 90% of the top 10 million websites. But even within these languages disparities are stark: Spanish, with 437 million native speakers, accounts for just 5.1% of websites, while German remains the second language online, although it is not one of the top ten in speaking terms. Furthermore, the top ten languages on the internet are just a tiny fraction of the world's 7,097 languages. These disparities create a digital divide that restricts access to data and information. UNESCO has recently underscored the role linguistic diversity can play in development, encouraging member states to invest in promoting multilingualism on the internet. Speakers of non-dominant languages need to be able to express themselves in culturally meaningful ways, create their own cultural content in local languages and share through cyberspace. After this presentation, attendees will be aware of the current internet's language diversity problem and ways in which language diversity may be reached.

Developmental Cultural Psychology: Tell Me Your Cultural and I will Give You a Brain
Presented by Fizza Gilani, Courtney Banks
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 336

After this presentation, attendees will be able to

  • identify developmental cultural psychology (DCP)
  • examine racial identity as a protective factor within DCP
  • understand the factors that influence DCP
  • integrate knowledge of DCP into the social and professional settings
Getting in Our Own Way: The Degradation of Student Organizations
Presented by Johnny Brownlee II
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice, Leadership Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 341

To figure out what factors are currently costing us members, stability, funding, involvement and respect of our former members, founders, elders and in some cases our institutions. We aim to find out is it a generational problem, educational, or do we take the power, prestige, and responsibility of student organizations and student involvement for granted. We'll also identify 6 major problems facing our organizations and learn to identify them and combat them. We'll learn how to get diversity, inclusion, representation, funding, respect and cooperation so that we can take our organizations to levels not even imagined. We not only discuss how to grow a large membership, and obtain a large budget, but how to make a deep impact on your campus, through your events, outreach, co-sponsorships, purpose and causes regardless the size of the organization. We often think our problems are financial, it's really creativity. We often think It's leadership, it's followship. We often think it's roster size, it's the utilization. We think it's our events, it's our purpose. It's not the problem, it's how we go about solving them.

How to Use Trigger and Content Warnings to Create a More Inclusive Classroom
Presented by Jennifer Boland, Kelci Davis
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice, Advisor/Graduate Student
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 335

The goal of this workshop is to provide attendees an understanding of the importance of using Trigger/Content Warnings (T/CW), how to best incorporate them in a classroom, and how the use of T/CWs create a more inclusive environment for students from various backgrounds. Awareness of T/CWs have increased in the public discussions; however, there has been little discussion of what they are, what is potentially triggering, and how to implement T/CWs without sacrificing necessary, but uncomfortable, dialogues. After attendees engage in this learning process, an exercise in which attendees will learn to identify material which may be triggering will help hone their sensitivity to inclusion. Then, attendees will participate in discussions to further their understanding. There will be three parts of this discussion:

  • how to balance reducing harmful content without eliminating necessary topics,
  • attendee's related experiences 
  • handling criticism of T/CWs.

Afterwards, attendees will be able to cultivate their own informed views on T/CWs and gain insight into how T/CWs impact their students. This knowledge can then be used to cultivate inclusive, safe classroom environments, in which students from diverse backgrounds can pursue learning experiences without the fear of choosing their academic success over their mental wellbeing.

Rise and Decline of Chicano Colleges & Schools in Texas
Presented by Dr. Antonio Gonzalez
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 338

Attendees will gain knowledge of a period between 1968-1990 and the existence of educational institutions founded by Mexican Americans, their historical origins in California, Oregon, primarily Texas and their fall.

The Impact of Anti-Immigrant Politics on the Psychological Well-Being of Immigrants
Presented by Grace Boland, Betsy Galicia, Dr. Temilola Salami
Workshop Tracks: Social Justice
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 133

In 2015, an estimated 12-million undocumented immigrants resided in the United States (Baker, 2018). Additionally, in 2017, approximately 12% of the U.S. population was comprised of second-generation immigrants, those born in the U.S. with at least one immigrant parent (PEW Research Center, 2019). As the political climate becomes increasingly charged with rhetoric surrounding immigration (Williams & Medlock, 2017), it has created a stressful environment for immigrants and their families (Almeida et al., 2016; Morey, 2018; Williams, Lawrence, & Davis, 2019). Exposure to this stress and discrimination can result in numerous psychological concerns including overall distress (Hatzenbuehler et al., 2017), depression (Cervantes et al., 2019), anxiety, and substance use (Garcini et al., 2017). However, the use of psychological services among immigrants and their families decreases following the implementation of anti-immigration policies (Fenton et al., 1996). Therefore, discussion and education about the impact politics have on the psychological well-being of immigrants is paramount. This workshop seeks to provide information about the potential psychological effects of immigration and the psychological impact of the current political climate. Using an educational and discussion-based format, attendees will gain knowledge of psychological problems within immigrant communities and be informed of the impact politics can have on psychological well-being.

What Would Lizzo Do: Prioritizing Confidence and Self-Acceptance in a Fatphobic Society
Presented by Brittani Clarkson
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 134

According to recent studies, the prevalence of weight discrimination in the United States has increased by 66% over the last decade (Puhl & Heuer, 2012). This fear and dislike of fat people and the stigmatization of individuals with bigger bodies is the very definition of fatphobia. This workshop will explore the ways in which overweight, obese, and fat-identifying individuals can combat societal fatphobia with all the confidence and sass of Ms. Lizzo herself in order to better their personal wellness. By attending this workshop, participants will understand the correlation between self-acceptance and health outcomes and explore the importance of self-advocacy. Singing and dancing are encouraged!

You’ve Got Me Mixed Up! Exploring Role Confusion through the Lens of [Perceived] Identity
Presented by Jimez Ashby
Workshop Tracks: Identity & Personal Development
Location: SHB (Smith-Hutson Business Building) 138

Who am I? Do I fit this identity description? Is it Identity Confusion or Role Confusion? "Identity Confusion" is a phrase that can be easily thrown around with a lack of context or full understanding. Within this session we will delve into the ideology of identity confusion as well as expand into role confusion. Using Erikson's Theory of PsychoSocial Development, we will explore how each of the eight stages is applied to personal identity development. Participants will be able to:

  • Increase self-awareness to better conceptualize how one evolves over the course of their life.
  • Draw distinctions between identity and role confusion by providing context and being able to identify the lens from which the perspective is being brought
  • Develop a toolkit that helps facilitate conversation around intersectionality and provide needed support and advocacy