Terminology

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Terminology

The first word in a pair is the equivalent of counting 1,2,3,4,5,etc...  The second, underlined word in a pair is an ordinal/rank number, as in: "first, second, third, fourth, etc...(You can see this in the Dan Ranking System.)

English Korean Korean (Count)
bon (ex. first)
bon
bon
bon
bon
bon
gop bon
dul bon
hop bon
bon

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Basic Terminology:

Korean English Describtion
(also "Ki") all martial arts, this refers to one's inner energy, or one's inner power.  This energy must be used and focused in order to effectively execute a move.  The inner Chi is said to be centered in one's tungen - the area approximately one fist-width below one's navel.  When doing kicks, punches, and soolgis, one is to send the Chi from the tungen through the part of the body that is executing a move.
(acadeny)
shout.  Note the word "ki" is part of this term.  Whenever we do a strike or a punch, or some key component of a technique, we shout in order to increase our energy level.  Shouting is essential to Hap Ki Do!  To do the kihap, draw air deeply into the abdomen just before the execution of a technique.  Then, while the technique is in motion, release the air with a sharp yell.  This does several things:

1.  It focuses the Ki.
2.  It prevents muscle strain by allowing the body to relax.
3.  It frightens your opponent.

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Falls (Nakbeop):

    Hap Ki Do involves the use of a variety of take-down techniques.  In order for the person receiving the technique to avoid injury, it is essential that he or she fall properly.  And, depending on the type of a fall, it may enable the person to get back up immediately in order to defend oneself.

Procedures for Falling:

    1.  Remain relaxed.

    2.  Fill your lungs with air as you are going down and immediately release the air once you make impact.

    3.  Visualize your body as a circular object when doing a forward roll or a backroll.  Even doing a side fall, correct position enables you to roll on your side in order to dissipate the energy without injuring yourself.

Names of Rolls:

English Korean
Roll bang nakbeop
Fall bang nakbeop
Fall bang nakbeop

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Kicks (Pal Ki Sul):

Names of Snap Kicks:
Names of Rising Kicks:
Names of Heel Kicks:
Names of Crescent Kicks:
Names of Ax Kicks:

Names of Snap Kicks:
(names end in "chagi")

English Korean
Snap chagi
Snap chagi
House chagi
Back Kick chagi
Spining, Crecent Kick chago kyoto chagi
Front Snap (for distance) dan op chagi
Front Snap (for height) op chagi
Front Snap (for height and distance) dan deo op chagi
Kick - High Kick Combo juna

 

Names of Rising Kicks:
(name ends in "oligi")

English Korean Rising oligi Rising oligi

 

Names of Heel Kicks:
(name ends in "doligi")

English Korean Wheel Kick with Heel Doligi Heel Kick chi doligi

 

Names of Crescent Kicks:
(name ends in "frigi")

English Korean Crescent oh dari frigi Crescent frigi

 

Names of Ax Kicks:

English Korean Kick ki chagi

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Hand Strikes (Doso chigi):

Note:    That the names of the hand strikes (doso chigi) use the ordinal/rank numbers, described Titles / Ranks: II bon, E bon, Sam bon, Sa bon.  In other words: first strike, second strike, third strike, forth strike.  The end of the name also includes a desriptive teerm for the strike as part of its complete name.

English Korean Strike (to eyes) chigi ill bon Nung chigi (first strike, finger strike) Hand chigi E bon soni meung chigi (second strike, knife hand)

    The knife hand should be used whenever any of the disengaging techniques are used, such as techniques 1a, 1b, and 1c in the Hans Mok Chapki soolgi set, and in the third technique in the Yans Mok Chapki soolgi set.  In these examples, you first escape the hand grab by making a knife hand and shooting it forward, and then you strike the opponent with a knife hand strike the opponent with a knife hand strike.

English Korean Strike chigi san bon meung chigi (chung quan) (third strike, first punch) Hand chigi sa bon yeok sool (yak sool) (fourth strike, ridge hand)

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Hand Strikes used for Board Braking (Keolk pah):

    For hand breaks, the correct sequence is the name of the strike and then the work "break" (keolk pah).  When an instructor asks you which break that you want to use during a test, give the correct name and then say "Sir" to the instructor.

English Korean with Fist Quan keolk pah with Palm of Hand (Palm Heel Strike) Quan keolk pah Hand sool keolk pah Hand meung chigi keolk

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Foot Strikes used for Board Braking:

    The correct sequence for foot breaks is: to say the word for break (keolk pah), followed by the type of kick, and "Sir":

Example: Keolk pah Yeop chagi, Sir = break with side snap kick

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Punch Defenses:

    Always aim your deflection technique at the opponent's elbow.
   To defend against a straight punch step to the side of its path.

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Kick Defenses:

    The ultimate kicking defenses are geared to control an opponent's kicking leg and send him to the ground in practice, we do not take down because of the risk of injury.

Linear Kicks (front, side, and ax kick) - to defend against these kicks, first step back or side-step out of the way of the kick

    1.  Front Kick (ap chagi) - intercept the kick with cross-arm block to the opponent's shin, then gab the leg and lift it.

    2.  Side Kick (yeop chagi) - step forward and to the side of the kick and capture the leg with your arm; now, with your leg behind his, push your opponent down.

    3.  Ax Kick (to ki chagi) - move toward your opponent as his leg is descending and catch his leg on your shoulder; then, grab his leg and move forward to throw the opponent down.

    Circular Kicks (roundhouse and spinning heel kick) - intercept the kick before it reaches its full potential.

    1.  Roundhouse (dollyeo chagi) - step toward your opponent and intercept his kick with your bicep; next, step behind your opponent's supporting leg while placing your hand on his chest.  Then, shove your opponent backwards and down.

    2.  Spinning Heel Kick (mom dollyeo chagi) - quickly close the distance by stepping inside the arc of the kick and intercept leg across bicep; the, place leg in front of opponent's supporting leg and push him down using your free arm.

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Arm Blocks:

English Korean Block Block Block

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Stances/Positions:

English Korean Stances zwa sae Stances zwa sae to Ready yut to Fight jack


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