Medical & Allied Health Programs

Director: Jack Turner, Ph.D. 936-294-2300; MedicalPrograms@shsu.edu

Information:

Address:
Lee Drain Building
1900 Avenue I, Room 201
Box 2209, Huntsville, TX 77341-2209

Telephone (936) 294-2300

Fax: (936) 294-3873

Website: http://www.shsu.edu/~medicalprograms

Mission

The mission of the Sam Houston State University Medical & Allied Health Program is to mentor, prepare, and guide highly motivated students in the successful fulfillment of the demanding and dynamic prerequisites for the medical or medically related professional program of their choosing. We believe the guidance and academic foundation you receive at Sam Houston State University to be among the strongest upon which to build your professional medical career. Your classification as a Medical & Allied Health Program (MAHP) student is a declaration of your intent to pursue the requisite academic scholarship and professional demeanor.  

Preparation for your medical career commences in the Fall Semester of your Freshman year or with your first college coursework. It is extremely important you begin by receiving advisement for the courses and course sequences appropriate to your medical career interests and goals. Typically, a pre-medical/dental–allied health student works toward a Bachelor or Science (or possibly Bachelor of Arts) degree. None of the Texas professional schools specifies a particular academic major or minor. However, since most of your prerequisite courses are in the sciences, a science major and minor (i.e., Biology, Chemistry, and/or Physics) provides for an efficient completion of requisite coursework leading to your Baccalaureate degree as well as preparation for professional school admission exams.

The Medical & Allied Health Program advises all students pursuing academic studies leading to professional programs in Chiropractic Medicine, Dentistry, Allopathic or Osteopathic Medicine, Nursing, Optometry, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, Podiatry, and Veterinary Medicine. Programs in Dental Hygiene, Occupational Therapy, Respiratory Therapy, for example, do typically not require completion of a prerequisite 4-year academic degree, but may have specific academic prerequisite coursework. The Medical & Allied Health Program Office can provide academic guidance and identify programs where professional certification can be obtained. 

Joint Admission Medical Program (JAMP)

Senate Bill 940 from the 77th Texas Legislature created the Joint Admission Medical Program (JAMP) to provide services to support and encourage highly qualified, economically disadvantaged students pursuing a medical career. The JAMP program provides for undergraduate and medical school scholarships as well as medical school admission to those students who satisfy the both academic and nonacademic requirements to at least one of the participating medical schools.

To join the growing JAMP student body at Sam Houston State University (SHSU), you must be a Texas resident and a high school or a home-schooled program graduate. As a high school senior, you must complete either the ACT or SAT, perform at or above the mean for the State of Texas, and provide your scores to SHSU with your application for admission to the Fall semester immediately following your high school graduation. Applicants must complete and submit the FAFSA and be eligible to receive a Pell Grant and/or an Estimated Family Contribution (EFC) up to 8,000 unless other evidence of economic disadvantaged status exists in the student’s Freshman year of college.

As a college Freshman at SHSU you must be a Texas resident, complete a minimum of 27 undergraduate credit hours during the Fall semester with a 3.25 overall GPA and a 3.25 GPA in all sciences courses taken (Math, Biology, Chemistry, or Physics). No more than 3 hours of AP credit can be used toward the 27 credit–hour requirement. Students who satisfy the academic and non-academic requirements are guaranteed admission to at least one participating medical school in Texas. Students interested in this program may find additional information under the JAMP ‘Curriculum Guide’ on this website, or contact the Medical & Allied Health Program Director./

Academic Preparation for Admission into Texas Dental Programs

SHSU Dental ProgramThere are three dental schools in Texas, all public institutions. All three dental schools have a four-year professional curriculum. Career options include: general dentistry; dental public health; endodontics; oral & maxillofacial pathology, radiology, or surgery; orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics; pediatric dentistry; periodontics; and prosthodontics.

Dental Schools require no specific academic major, but do require a core of 14 hours biology, 8 hours inorganic chemistry, 8 hours organic chemistry, 8 hours of biochemistry, 8 hours physics, 3 hours of statistics, and 6 hours of English. Most students find additional science coursework to be beneficial in performing well on the DAT exam. All prerequisite courses must be Science Major credible. Dental Schools of other states may have a different slate of core requirements. Most dental colleges do not accept AP credit to meet admission requirements. All Natural Science majors are efficient pathways to medical colleges. If you choose a major outside of the Physical and Biological Science areas you must include the basic science requirements for dental school along with satisfying requirements appropriate for your major. A widespread misconception suggesting it is necessary to major in a science, especially biology, or that dental schools prefer science majors is not accurate. The truth is that a majority of dental school applicants are natural science majors, but any academic major is suitable and acceptable for dental school as long as the prerequisite coursework is complete.

Serious students seeking dental career opportunities should seek advisement from the Office of Medical & Allied Health Programs. The specialized sequence of coursework meets basic prerequisite needs of the Texas dental programs within the scope of a generalized natural science major and minor. This approach provides the greatest flexibility for alternative strategies should they be necessary.

The pre-dental curriculum listed here serves to as a guide for the biology major / chemistry minor. Other academic majors and minors can be used, but may require more coursework than the usual 120-hour baccalaureate.

Major in Biology, Minor in Chemistry
Dentistry Track

3 Digit to 4 Digit Crosswalk
SHSU Course NumberHoursRecommended Sequence
Core Curriculum
Component Area I (Communication) 6 Freshman
Component Area II (Mathematics) 3 Freshman
Component Area III (Natural Sciences with labs) 8 Freshman
Component Area IV    
           Visual & Performing Arts 3 Freshman
           Literature/Philosophy 3 Sophomore
           Cultural Studies 3 Sophomore
Component Area V (Social/Behavioral Sciences) 15 Freshman, Sophomore, Junior
Component Area VI (Institutionally Designated Option) 1 Freshman
Degree Specific Requirements
Major Core2
BIO 161/111 <BIOL 1311/1111>, BIO 162/112 <BIOL 1313/1113>1 8 Freshman
CHM 138/118 <CHEM 1311/1111>, CHM 139/119 <CHEM 312/1112> 8 Freshman
MTH 141 <MATH 1410>, MTH 142 <MATH 1420> 7 Freshman
BIO 244 <BIOL 2440>, BIO 345 <BIOL 3450> 8 Freshman
BIO 340 <BIOL 3409> 4 Junior, Senior
CHM 238/218 <CHEM 2323/2123>, CHM 239/CHM 219 <CHEM 2325/2125> 8 Sophomore
MTH 379 <MATH 3379> 3 Sophomore
PHY 138/118 <PHYS 1301/1101>, PHY 139/119 <PHYS 1302/1102> 8 Sophomore
BIO 347 <BIOL 3470> 4 Junior
BIO 342 <BIOL 3420>, BIO 344 <BIOL 3440> 8 Junior
BIO 410 <BIOL 4110>, BIO 411 <BIOL 4111> 2 Senior
Minor Core2
CHM 241 <CHEM 2401>, CHM 348 <CHEM 3438> 8 Junior
CHM 339 <CHEM 3339> 3 Senior
Major Electives
Choose any three (3) of the following courses:
BIO 346 <BIOL 3460>, BIO 348 <BIOL 3480>, BIO 349 <3490>, BIO 435 <BIOL 4350>, BIO 436 <BIOL 4360>, BIO 438 <BIOL 4380>, BIO 446 <BIOL 4460>, BIO 449 <BIOL 4490>, BIO 493 <BIOL 4493>
10-12 Junior/Senior
Total Hours:  120-3  

Notes:

1 Meets the requirements of Component Area III, Natural Sciences.

2 The same course(s) may not be used to satisfy both major and minor requirements (no double dipping of courses).


Academic Preparation for Admission into Texas Medical Programs

SHSU Pre-Medical ProgramsThere are ten medical schools in Texas; nine allopathic medical schools award the M.D. degree and one osteopathic medical school awards the D.O. degree. Eight of the nine schools are state-supported. Several new state branch medical programs are also slated to become operational within the next few years in response to the national physician shortage. Baylor College of Medicine is the only private medical school in the state. Baylor receives a subsidy from the Texas legislature that allows Texas residents to pay the same tuition to attend Baylor as to attend state-supported medical schools. Texas medical schools have a four-year professional curriculum that continues as a residency-training program lasting from three to seven years, depending on the specialty. The core of basic sciences and clinical clerkships is similar at all of the medical schools with primary care (general practice, pediatrics, internal medicine, and obstetrics) emphasized. Medical students awarded the M.D. or D.O. degree chooses to enter either allopathic or osteopathic residencies, depending on their choice of specialty.

Medical schools require no specific academic major, but do require a core of 14 hours biology, 8 hours chemistry, 8 hours organic chemistry, 4 hours biochemistry, 8 hours physics, 3—4 hours of calculus, 3—4 hours of statistics and 6 hours of English. Most students find additional science coursework to be beneficial in performing well on the MCAT exam. All prerequisite courses must be Science Major credible. Medical Schools of other states may have a different slate of core requirements. Most medical colleges do not accept AP credit to meet admission requirements. All Natural Science majors are efficient pathways to medical colleges. In addition to the majors in the Physical and Biological Sciences, other disciplines, such as anthropology, community studies, sociology, psychology, and environmental studies may offer a variety of interesting courses appropriate for students interested in medical school. However, if you choose a major outside of the Physical and Biological Science area you must include the basic science requirements for medical school along with satisfying requirements appropriate for your major.  A widespread misconception suggesting it is necessary to major in a science, especially biology, or that medical schools prefer science majors is not accurate. The truth is that a majority of medical school applicants are natural science majors, but any academic major is suitable and acceptable for medical school as long as the prerequisite coursework is complete.

Serious students seeking career opportunities in the field of Medicine should seek advisement from the Office of Medical & Allied Health Programs. The specialized sequence of coursework that meets basic prerequisite needs of the Texas medical programs is within the scope of a generalized natural science major and minor. This approach provides the greatest flexibility for alternative strategies should they be necessary.

The pre-medical curriculum listed here serves to as a guide for the biology major / chemistry minor. Other academic majors and minors can be used, but may require more coursework than the usual 120-hour baccalaureate.

Bachelor of Science
Major in Biology, Minor in Chemistry
Allopathic, Osteopathic, and Chiropractic Medical Track

3 Digit to 4 Digit Crosswalk
SHSU Course NumberHoursRecommended Sequence
Core Curriculum
Component Area I (Communication) 6 Freshman
Component Area II (Mathematics) 3 Freshman
Component Area III (Natural Sciences) 8 Freshman
Component Area IV    
          (Visual & Performing Arts) 3 Freshman
          (Literature/Philosophy) 3 Sophomore
          (Cultural Studies) 3 Sophomore
Component Area V (Social/Behavioral Sciences) 15 Freshman, Sophomore, Junior
Component Area VI (Institutionally Designated Option) 1 Freshman
Degree Specific Requirements
Major Core2
BIO 161/111<BIOL 1311/1111> , BIO 162/1121 <BIOL 1312/1112> 8 Freshman
CHM 138/118<CHEM 1311/1111>, CHM 139/119<CHEM 312/1112> 8 Freshman
MTH 141 <MATH 1410>, MTH 142 <MATH 1420> 7 Freshman
BIO 244 <BIOL 2440>, BIO 345 <BIOL 3450> 8 Freshman
BIO 340 <BIOL 3409> 4 Sophomore
CHM 238/218 <CHEM 2323/2123>,
CHM 239/CHM 219 <CHEM 2325/2125>
8 Sophomore
MTH 379 <MATH 3379> 3 Sophomore
PHY 138/118 <PHYS 1301/1101>, PHY 139/119 <PHYS 1302/1102> 8 Sophomore
BIO 347 <BIOL 3470> 4 Junior
BIO 342 <BIOL 3420>, BIO 344 <BIOL 3440> 8 Junior
BIO 410 <BIOL 4110>, BIO 411 <BIOL 4111> 2 Senior
Minor Core2
CHM 241 <CHEM 2401>, CHM 348 <CHEM 3438> 8 Junior
CHM 339 <CHEM 3339> 3 Senior
Major Electives
Choose any three (3) of the following courses:
 BIO 346 <BIOL 3460>,
BIO 348 <BIOL 3480>, BIO 349 <3490>, BIO 435 <BIOL 4350>,
BIO 436 <BIOL 4360>, BIO 438 <BIOL 4368>, BIO 446 <BIOL 4460>,
BIO 449 <BIOL 4490>, BIO 493 <BIOL 4493>
10-12 Junior / Senior
Total Hours:  120-3  
Notes:

1Meets the requirements of Component Area III, Natural Sciences

2The same course(s) may not be used to satisfy both major & minor requirements (no double dipping of courses).

Academic Preparation for Admission into the Sam Houston State University – School of Nursing

SHSU Nursing ProgramsTexas, the nation, and the world are facing an unprecedented nursing shortage due to many factors including an aging workforce, declining enrollment in nursing schools, and job stress. Officials estimate that Texas needs to graduate and place an additional 5000 nurses each year to meet the state’s needs. As a result, new graduates and returning nurses have more practice opportunities within the hospital and the option to enter specialty or advanced practice fields with just a little experience.

Registered nurses (RN) work to promote health, prevent disease, and help families cope with illness; provide direct care, observe, assess, and record symptoms, reactions, and patient progress; assist physicians during treatments and examinations; administer medications; and assist in convalescence and rehabilitation. Registered nurses develop care plans, chart progress, diagnose limited conditions, and serve as a liaison and advocate for the patient and family.  

Texas RNs operate under the Nursing Practice Act administered by the Texas Board of Nurse Examiners. Students must complete a program at an accredited college or university and pass the National licensing exam, the NCLEX. Once licensed, nurses usually complete additional training or work with a mentor nurse at the worksite and are required to attend continuing education each year. Only those completing all of the above requirements are allowed to use the RN title.

A registered nurse (RN) may earn that credential in several ways. Currently most generic, newly graduated high school students, complete a two-year associate degree program at a community or junior college (ADN) or the complete a four-year Bachelor of Science in nursing at a college or university (BSN). Students holding a baccalaureate degree in an academic area other than nursing may enter a ‘fast-track’ program for entry into the BSN program. Students in a fast-track program are typically eligible for admission to nursing school after completing a defined core of pre-nursing coursework. Fast-track coursework is variable among the BSN programs but generally includes, but is not necessarily limited to, Anatomy, Physiology, Microbiology, Chemistry, Pathophysiology Nutrition, General and Developmental Psychology, and Statistics. Students who opt to complete the ADN may complete a transition program consisting of both academic and clinical coursework, moving them from ADN to BSN credentials.

There are nearly 40 accredited BSN programs in Texas, each of which requiring a slightly different set of prerequisite coursework for admission consideration. The optimal strategy for a pre-nursing student is to complete a slate of coursework that will qualify them for admission to the greatest number of nursing schools by completing the least number of requisite courses. Typically, 20–22 academic courses comprise the pre-nursing or academic portion of the BSN coursework. Acceptance into nursing school, the clinical portion of the BSN, is predicated on academic performance, recommendations, and admissions test (Test of Essential Academic Skills—TEAS Test or Health Education Systems, Inc. HE SI are common) and occasionally personality testing and/or interviews. Considerable variation exists for the clinical portions of the BSN and students should contact the programs they are interested in attending for specific requirements. Students should contact the programs they are interested in attending for specific requirements. Admissions requirements to the Sam Houston State University Nursing Department can be found elsewhere in this catalog.

Serious students seeking career opportunities in the field of Nursing should seek advisement from the Office of Medical & Allied Health Programs. 

Generic Pre-Nursing Track

3 Digit to 4 Digit Crosswalk
SHSU Course NumberHoursRecommended Sequence
Core Curriculum
Component Area I (Communication) 6 Freshman
Component Area II (Mathematics) 3 Freshman
Component Area III (Natural Sciences) 8 Freshman
Component Area IV    
          (Visual & Performing Arts) 3 Freshman
          (Literature/Philosophy) 3 Sophomore
          (Cultural Studies) 3 Sophomore
Component Area V (Social/Behavioral Sciences) 15 Freshman, Sophomore
Component Area VI (Institutionally Designated Option) 1 Freshman
Degree Specific Requirements
Core3
BIO 2451 <BIOL 2401>, BIO 246 <BIOL 2402> 8 Freshman
CHM 135/1152  <CHEM 1306/1106> 4 Freshman
MTH 1703, 169 <MATH 1314, 1369> 6 Freshman
BIO 247 <BIOL 2420> 8 Sophomore
FCS 262 <FACE 2362> 3 Sophomore
PSY 131 <PSYC 1301> PSY 374 <PSYC 3374> 6 Sophomore
Total Hours: 63  

Notes:

1,2Meets the requirements of Component Area III, Natural Sciences

3MTH 170 <MATH 1314> fulfills the requirement of Component Area II, Mathematics

4PSY 131 <PSYC 1301> partially fulfills the requirement of Component Area V, Social/Behavioral Science

Academic Preparation for Admission into Texas Optometry Programs

SHSU Pre-Optometry ProgramsDoctors of Optometry are independent primary health care providers who specialize in the examination, diagnosis, treatment, and management of diseases and disorders of the visual system, the eye, and associated structures as well as the diagnosis of related systemic conditions. Optometrists are primary-care providers and therefore must recognize ocular and visual signs of disease, understand the wide range of health problems affecting a patient, and refer patients to appropriate specialists. Some optometrist work in a general practice, while others work in specialties such as contact lenses, geriatrics, low vision services (for visually impaired patients), occupational vision (to protect and preserve workers vision and minimize eye strain), pediatrics, sports vision and vision therapy. Other optometrists may choose to enter optometric education and/or perform scientific research.

Doctors of Optometry must successfully complete a four-year accredited degree program at one of the 17 schools or colleges of optometry in the United States. Most students accepted by a school or college of optometry have completed their baccalaureate degree.

Undergraduate preparation for the study of optometry requires a strong foundation in natural sciences and mathematics, and a background in the humanities and social sciences. Prior to admission into a college of optometry, students must have a baccalaureates degree and must have satisfactorily completed specific prerequisite courses. An overall GPA and science GPA of 3.25 should be considered minimum. All prerequisite courses must be completed with a minimum grade of ‘C.’

The minimum course requirements for colleges of optometry are essentially the same as for most doctoral medical programs. This curriculum includes science–major laboratory coursework in biology (12 hours), general or inorganic chemistry (8 hours), organic chemistry (8 hours), biochemistry (4 hours), physics (8 hours), calculus I (3-4 hours), statistics (3 hours) and English (6 hours). Additional coursework in comparative vertebrate anatomy, genetics, cell and molecular biology, physiology, microbiology, embryology, advanced mathematics, and psychology are highly recommended.

In addition to the academic majors in the Physical and Biological Sciences, other disciplines, such as anthropology, community studies, sociology, and psychology may offer a variety of interesting courses appropriate for students interested in optometry school. However, if you choose a major outside of the Physical and Biological Science area you must include the basic science requirements for optometry school along with satisfying requirements appropriate for your major.  A widespread misconception suggesting it is necessary to major in a science, especially biology, or that optometry schools prefer science majors is not accurate. The truth is that a majority of medical school applicants are natural science majors, but any academic major is suitable and acceptable for medical school as long as the prerequisite coursework is complete.

Undergraduate preparation for the study of optometry requires a strong foundation in science and mathematics and a background in the humanities and social sciences. Prior to admission in the college of optometry students must have a baccalaureates degree and must have satisfactorily completed 55 hours of specific prerequisite courses (listed below) with a grade of ‘C’ or better. Students may apply for admission while completing their pre-optometry course work.

Potential optometry students are evaluated on the basis of GPA, performance on the Optometry Admission Test (OAT), extra-curricular and community service activities, personal interview, professional potential, etc. Early application is desirable and deadlines range from October to April for the various schools and colleges of optometry. Each institution has its own guidelines; therefore, students should contact the schools or colleges of their choice to obtain a catalog and specific application procedures. Contact information can be obtained at the ASCO website above. Optometrists must be state licensed. All states require graduation from an accredited professional optometric degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. Most states accept the results of the National Board of Examiners in Optometry.

Serious students seeking Optometry career opportunities should seek advisement from the Office of Medical & Allied Health Programs. The specialized sequence of coursework meets basic prerequisite needs of the Optometry programs within the scope of a generalized natural science major and minor. This approach provides the greatest flexibility for alternative strategies should they be necessary.

The pre-optometry curriculum listed here serves to as a guide for the biology major / chemistry minor. Other academic majors and minors can be used, but may require more coursework than the usual 120-hour baccalaureate. 

Bachelor of Science
Major in Biology, Minor in Chemistry
Optometry Track

3 Digit to 4 Digit Crosswalk
SHSU Course NumberHoursRecommended Sequence
Core Curriculum
Component Area I (Communication) 6 Freshman
Component Area II (Mathematics) 3 Freshman
Component Area III (Natural Sciences) 8 Freshman
Component Area IV    
          (Visual & Performing Arts) 3 Freshman
          (Literature/Philosophy) 3 Sophomore
          (Cultural Studies) 3 Sophomore
Component Area V (Social/Behavioral Sciences) 15 Freshman, Sophomore, Junior
Component Area VI (Institutionally Designated Option) 1 Freshman
Degree Specific Requirements
Major Core2
BIO 161/111<BIOL 1311/1111>,
BIO 162/1121
<BIOL 1313/1113>
8 Freshman
CHM 138/118<CHEM 1311/1111>,
CHM 139/119 <CHEM 1312/1112>
8 Freshman
MTH 141 <MATH 1410>, MTH 142 <MATH 1420> 7 Freshman
BIO 244 <BIOL 2440>, BIO 345 <BIOL 3450> 8 Freshman
BIO 340 <BIOL 3409> 4 Junior/Senior
CHM 238/218 <CHEM 2323/2123>,
CHM 239/CHM 219 <CHEM 2325/2125>
8 Sophomore
MTH 379 <MATH 3379> 3 Sophomore
PHY 138/118 <PHYS 1301/1101>,
PHY 139
/119 <PHYS 1302/1102>
8 Sophomore
BIO 347 <BIOL 3470> 4 Junior
BIO 342 <BIOL 3420>, BIO 344 <BIOL 3440> 8 Junior
BIO 410 <BIOL 4110>, BIO 411 <BIOL 4111> 2 Senior
Minor Core2
CHM 241 <CHEM 2401>, CHM 348 <CHEM 3438> 8 Junior
CHM 339 <CHEM 3339> 3 Senior
Major Electives
Choose any three (3) of the following courses:

BIO 346 <BIOL 3460>
, BIO 348 <BIOL 3480>,
BIO 349
<3490>, BIO 435 <BIOL 4350>,
BIO 436
<BIOL 4360>, BIO 438 <BIOL 4368>,
BIO 446 <BIOL 4460>, BIO 449 <BIOL 4490>,
BIO 493 <BIOL 4493>
10-12 Junior / Senior
Total Hours: 120-3  

Notes:

1Meets the requirements of Component Area III, Natural Sciences

2The same course(s) may not be used to satisfy both major & minor requirements (no double dipping of courses).

Academic Preparation for Admission into Texas Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm. D.) Programs

SHSU Pre-Pharmacy ProgramsPharmacists are a vital part of a complete health care system. The increasing numbers of middle-aged and elderly people, who use more prescription drugs than younger people, will continue to spur demand for pharmacists in all employment settings and the pharmacist workforce will continue to see stability and expansion. In addition, new developments in genome research and medication distribution systems will increase the number of drug products available. As a result, the ever increasingly sophisticated health care consumer will attempt to seek out more and more resources for drug information, to determine the best prescription drug coverage plans for them, and investigate the new Medicare drug coverage program. All of this will contribute to the growth and stability within the pharmacy profession.

The work environment for pharmacy continues to transform with the increasing needs within health care. Pharmacy settings are diverse: chain stores, independent, consulting, government agencies such as National Institutes of Health (NIH), Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), academia, industry, hospitals, nursing homes, assisted-living facilities, home care settings, research centers, poison control centers, mail order, drug wholesalers, and pharmacy governing bodies.

There are 104 Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy in the United States. The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) website, www.aacp.org, lists 91 Schools of Pharmacy that are AACP Regular Institutional Members, five Associate Institutional Members, and eight Affiliate Institutional Members. The American Council on Pharmaceutical Education (ACPE), www.acpe.org, accredits U.S. colleges of pharmacy. There are six colleges of pharmacy located within Texas: Texas A & M University-Kingsville, Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas Tech at Amarillo, University of Houston, University of Incarnate Word in San Antonio, and University of Texas at Austin.

A pre-pharmacy student possesses a conscientious mind-set, strong verbal and written communication skills, an ability to pay attention to detail, and sound decision-making ability. Most students are in a pre-pharmacy or pre-medical science program prior to applying to pharmacy school and have a strong background (major and minor) in the natural sciences (biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics). A student can be any major as long as all pre-pharmacy requirements are met for the specific Pharmacy Program(s) the student is applying for entry. Most students take an average of 2½ to 3 years to complete course prerequisites for any of the pharmacy colleges and possess an overall 3.4 GPA or better. Although a prior degree is not required, it is highly recommended. 

All Texas Pharmacy Programs require the PCAT (Pharmacy College Admission Test) for admission consideration. The PCAT requires comprehension in the areas of chemistry, biology, quantitative analysis, verbal ability, reading writing. The student should take the PCAT the summer or fall prior to the year they plan to apply. Scores of 70% in all sections of the PCAT are considered competitive scores for most colleges. A student may take the PCAT exam more than once.

Pharmacy experience is helpful and encouraged. The community service and pharmacy experience should be evident in the interview process revealing the student’s passion and sensitivity toward others and the profession. The pharmacy technician certification is not a requirement for admission.

All Texas colleges admit students only in the fall semester and are not a part of PharmCAS, a centralized application service. The student desiring to apply to other states should visit the website, www.pharmcas.org, and determine which of those colleges require the centralized process.

Serious students seeking Pharmacy career opportunities should seek advisement from the Office of Medical & Allied Health Programs. The specialized sequence of coursework meets basic prerequisite needs of the Texas Pharm. D programs within the scope of a generalized natural science major and minor. This approach provides the greatest flexibility for alternative strategies should they be necessary.

The pre-pharmacy curriculum listed here serves to as a guide for the biology major / chemistry minor. Other academic majors and minors can be used, but may require more coursework than the usual 120-hour baccalaureate. 

Bachelor of Science
Major in Biology, Minor in Chemistry
Pharmacy Track

3 Digit to 4 Digit Crosswalk
SHSU Course NumberHoursRecommended Sequence
Core Curriculum
Component Area I (Communication) 6 Freshman
Component Area II (Mathematics) 3 Freshman
Component Area III (Natural Sciences) 8 Freshman
Component Area IV    
          (Visual & Performing Arts) 3 Freshman
          (Literature/Philosophy) 3 Sophomore
          (Cultural Studies) 3 Sophomore
Component Area V (Social/Behavioral Sciences) 15 Freshman, Sophomore, Junior
Component Area VI (Institutionally Designated Option) 1 Freshman
Degree Specific Requirements
Major Core2
BIO 161/111<BIOL 1311/1111>, BIO 162/1121 <BIOL 1313/1113> 8 Freshman
CHM 138/118<CHEM 1311/1111>, CHM 139/119 <CHEM 1312/1112> 8 Freshman
MTH 141 <MATH 1410>, MTH 142 <MATH 1420> 7 Freshman
BIO 244 <BIOL 2440>, BIO 345 <BIOL 3450> 8 Freshman
BIO 340 <BIOL 3409> 4
Junior/Senior
CHM 238/218 <CHEM 2323/2123>, CHM 239/CHM 219 <CHEM 2325/2125> 8 Sophomore
MTH 379 <MATH 3379> 3 Sophomore
PHY 138/118 <PHYS 1301/1101>, PHY 139/119 <PHYS 1302/1102> 8 Sophomore
BIO 347 <BIOL 3470> 4 Junior
BIO 342 <BIOL 3420>, BIO 344 <BIOL 3440> 8 Junior
BIO 410 <BIOL 4110>, BIO 411 <BIOL 4111> 2 Senior
Minor Core2
CHM 241 <CHEM 2401>, CHM 348 <CHEM 3438> 8 Junior
CHM 339 <CHEM 3339> 3 Senior
Major Electives
Choose any three (3) of the following coursesBIO 346 <BIOL 3460>, BIO 348 <BIOL 3480>, BIO 349 <3490>, BIO 435 <BIOL 4350>, BIO 436 <BIOL 4360>, BIO 438 <BIOL 4368>, BIO 446 <BIOL 4460>, BIO 449 <BIOL 4490>, BIO 493 <BIOL 4493> 10-12 Junior / Senior
Total Hours: 120-3  

Notes:

1Meets the requirements of Component Area III, Natural Sciences

2The same course(s) may not be used to satisfy both major & minor requirements (no double dipping of courses).

Academic Preparation for Admission into Texas Doctor of Physical Therapy Programs

SHSU Physical Therapy ProgramsPhysical therapists provide health care services that help restore function, improve mobility, relieve pain, and prevent or limit permanent physical disabilities of patients suffering from injuries or disease. They restore, maintain, and promote overall fitness and health. The goal is to improve how an individual functions at work and at home by improving the client’s strength, range of motion, balance and coordination, posture, muscle performance, respiration, and motor function. Clients include accident victims and individuals with disabling conditions.

Some physical therapists treat a wide range of ailments; others specialize in areas such as pediatrics, geriatrics, orthopedics, sports medicine, neurology, and cardiopulmonary physical therapy. They frequently consult and practice with physicians, dentists, nurses, educators, social workers, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, and audiologists.

The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) identifies 10 accredited physical therapy programs in Texas offering a Doctoral level program. At present nine of the ten programs offer a Doctoral level program, the remaining program will offer the Doctoral level program in summer of 2010. Prerequisites for these doctoral programs include a balance of coursework in humanities, social sciences, and the natural sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Math) as defined by APTA. Math and science coursework are recommended for completion at 4-year institutions with upper division, science major credible, natural science coursework. Although no specific major and/or minor is specified, most successful applicants major and / or minor is within the natural sciences. Admission to an accredited Texas PT program is highly competitive due to the small entry cohort; a grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0-point scale is considered minimum. The Graduate Record Exam is required for all PT programs, however its use as part of the admission profile varies between the Physical Therapy schools. As with any of the competitive admission medical programs, students should formulate viable alternative strategies if their application attempts are unsuccessful. Unsuccessful physical therapy students are frequently found among the successful medical school applicants.

Serious students seeking career opportunities in field of Physical Therapy should seek advisement from the Office of Medical & Allied Health Programs. The specialized sequence of coursework meets basic prerequisite needs of the Texas PT programs within the scope of a generalized natural science major and minor. This approach provides the greatest flexibility for alternative strategies should they be necessary.

The pre-physical therapy curriculum listed here serves as a guide for the biology major / chemistry minor. Other academic majors and minors can be used, but may require more coursework than the usual 120-hour baccalaureate. 

Bachelor of Science
Major in Biology, Minor in Chemistry
Physical Therapy Track

3 Digit to 4 Digit Crosswalk
SHSU Course NumberHoursRecommended Sequence
Core Curriculum
Component Area I (Communication) 6 Freshman
Component Area II (Mathematics) 3 Freshman
Component Area III (Natural Sciences) 8 Freshman
Component Area IV    
          (Visual & Performing Arts) 3 Freshman
          (Literature/Philosophy) 3 Sophomore
          (Cultural Studies) 3 Sophomore
Component Area V (Social/Behavioral Sciences) 15 Freshman, Sophomore, Junior
Component Area VI (Institutionally Designated Option) 1 Freshman
Degree Specific Requirements
Major Core2
BIO 161/111<BIOL 1311/1111>, BIO 162/1121 <BIOL 1313/1113> 8 Freshman
CHM 138/118<CHEM 1311/1111>, CHM 139/119 <CHEM 1312/1112> 8 Freshman
MTH 141 <MATH 1410>, MTH 142 <MATH 1420> 7 Freshman
BIO 244 <BIOL 2440>, BIO 345 <BIOL 3450> 8 Freshman
BIO 340 <BIOL 3409> 4 Sophomore
CHM 238/218 <CHEM 2323/2123>, CHM 239/CHM 219 <CHEM 2325/2125> 8 Junior, Senior
MTH 379 <MATH 3379> 3 Sophomore
PHY 138/118 <PHYS 1301/1101>, PHY 139/119 <PHYS 1302/1102> 8 Sophomore
BIO 347 <BIOL 3470> 4 Junior
BIO 342 <BIOL 3420>, BIO 344 <BIOL 3440> 8 Junior
BIO 410 <BIOL 4110>, BIO 411 <BIOL 4111> 2 Senior
Minor Core3
CHM 241 <CHEM 2401>, CHM 348 <CHEM 3438> 8 Junior
CHM 339 <CHEM 3339> 3 Senior
Major Electives
Choose any three (3) of the following courses:BIO 346 <BIOL 3460>, BIO 348 <BIOL 3480>, BIO 349 <3490>, BIO 435 <BIOL 4350>, BIO 436 <BIOL 4360>, BIO 438 <BIOL 4368>, BIO 446 <BIOL 4460>, BIO 449 <BIOL 4490>, BIO 493 <BIOL 4493> 10-12 Junior / Senior
Program Track Requirements
HED 272 <HLTH 2372> 3  
PSY 1313 <PSYC 1301>, PSY 374 <PSYC 3374> 6  
COM 282 <COMS 2382> 3  
ENG 330 <ENGL 3330> 3  
Total Hours:  120-3  

Notes:

1Meets the requirements of Component Area III, Natural Sciences

2PSY 131 <PSYC 1301> partially fulfills the requirements Component Area V, Social and Behavioral Sciences

3The same course(s) may not be used to satisfy both major & minor requirements (no double dipping of courses).

Academic Preparation for Admission into Texas Physician Assistant Programs

SHSU Physician Assistant ProgramsPhysician Assistants, frequently called PAs, have a broad scope of duties and responsibilities, largely governed by the medical setting in which they work.  Physician Assistants are regulated by the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners and work under the supervision of physicians. Texas requires that the PA's supervising physician register with the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners and that PAs be licensed.

Duties of PAs working under a primary care physician include: performing appropriate interviews and physical examinations; ordering and screening results of laboratory diagnostic studies; organizing and integrating information derived from the interview, examination, and laboratory; assisting with the performance of clinical procedures; instructing and counseling patients regarding preventative health care behaviors; monitoring responses to physician-directed programs of therapy; responding independently to life-threatening situations; facilitating patient access to appropriate health care services; making tentative assessments; making tentative diagnostic and therapeutic plans in such a way that the physician can perceive the medical problems and determine appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic steps; assisting the physician by performing diagnostic and therapeutic procedures; managing various common medical problems; treating minor cuts and wounds; removing casts; and changing dressings. In addition, PAs are employed as first and second assistants in surgery, particularly in cardiovascular and orthopedic surgery. 

Physician Assistants have been enabled to practice in 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico, and they are prominent health care providers in the uniformed services, National Health Service Corp, the Veterans Administration, and federal and state correctional facilities. Physician Assistants have delegated prescriptive authority in 41 states and in federal facilities. Physician Assistants are represented by the American Academy of Physician Assistants, and in Texas by the Texas Academy of Physician Assistants.

A widespread misconception suggesting it is necessary to major in a science, especially biology, or that PA Programs prefer science majors is not accurate. The truth is that a majority of PA Program applicants are natural science majors, but any academic major is suitable and acceptable for PA as long as the prerequisite coursework is complete.

The Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant website, www.arc-pa.org, lists 8 accredited physician assistant programs in Texas; all offer the MS in Physician Assistant Studies upon completion of their program. To be licensed in Texas as a PA, you must graduate from an accredited PA program and pass the national certification examination administered by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants.

Serious students seeking career opportunities in the field of Medicine should seek advisement from the Office of Medical & Allied Health Programs. The specialized sequence of coursework that meets basic prerequisite needs of the Texas PA programs is within the scope of a generalized natural science major and minor. This approach provides the greatest flexibility for alternative strategies should they be necessary.

The pre-physician assistant curriculum listed here serves to as a guide for the biology major / chemistry minor. Other academic majors and minors can be used, but may require more coursework than the usual 120-hour baccalaureate. 

Bachelor of Science
Major in Biology, Minor in Chemistry
Physician Assistance Track

3 Digit to 4 Digit Crosswalk
SHSU Course NumberHoursRecommended Sequence
Core Curriculum
Component Area I (Communication) 6 Freshman
Component Area II (Mathematics) 3 Freshman
Component Area III (Natural Sciences) 8 Freshman
Component Area IV    
          (Visual & Performing Arts) 3 Freshman
          (Literature/Philosophy) 3 Sophomore
          (Cultural Studies) 3 Sophomore
Component Area V (Social/Behavioral Sciences) 15 Freshman, Sophomore, Junior
Component Area VI (Institutionally Designated Option) 1 Freshman
Degree Specific Requirements
Major Core2
BIO 161/111 <BIOL 1311/1111>, BIO 162/1121 <BIOL 1313/1113> 8 Freshman
CHM 138/118<CHEM 1311/1111>, CHM 139/119 <CHEM 1312/1112> 8 Freshman
MTH 141 <MATH 1410>, MTH 142 <MATH 1420> 7 Freshman
BIO 244 <BIOL 2440>, BIO 345 <BIOL 3450> 8 Freshman
BIO 340 <BIOL 3409> 4 Sophomore
CHM 238/218 <CHEM 2323/2123>, CHM 239/CHM 219 <CHEM 2325/2125> 8 Sophomore
MTH 379 <MATH 3379> 3 Sophomore
PHY 138/118 <PHYS 1301/1101>, PHY 139/119 <PHYS 1302/1102> 8 Sophomore
BIO 347 <BIOL 3470> 4 Junior
BIO 342 <BIOL 3420>, BIO 344 <BIOL 3440> 8 Junior
BIO 410 <BIOL 4110>, BIO 411 <BIOL 4111> 2 Senior
Minor Core2
CHM 241 <CHEM 2401>, CHM 348 <CHEM 3438> 8 Junior
CHM 339 <CHEM 3339> 3 Senior
Major Electives
Choose any three (3) of the following courses: 
BIO 346 <BIOL 3460>, BIO 348 <BIOL 3480>, BIO 349 <3490>, BIO 435 <BIOL 4350>, BIO 436 <BIOL 4360>, BIO 438 <BIOL 4368>, BIO 446 <BIOL 4460>, BIO 449 <BIOL 4490>, BIO 493 <BIOL 4493>
10-12 Junior / Senior
Program Track Requirements
CHM 241 <CHEM 2401>, CHM 348 <CHEM 3438>
Total Hours: 120-3  

Notes:

1Meets the requirements of Component Area III, Natural Sciences

2The same course(s) may not be used to satisfy both major & minor requirements (no double dipping of courses).

Academic Preparation for Admission into Doctor of Podiatric Medicine (D.P.M.) Programs

SHSU PodiatryA Doctor of Podiatric Medicine (D.P.M.) specializes in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, through both medical and surgical means, of diseases and disorders affecting the human foot. A D.P.M. makes independent judgments, administers treatment, prescribes medication, and when necessary, performs surgery. Currently, there are no colleges of podiatric medicine in Texas.

To prepare for admission to a college of podiatric medicine a student must have a minimum of 90 semester hours. However, over 95% of students who matriculate at podiatric medical schools have a baccalaureate degree, with a natural science major and minor. The Council on Podiatry Education of the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) is the accrediting agency. The APMA website, www.aacpm.org, identifies seven accredited colleges of podiatric medicine and one college that has achieved candidate status. 

Applicants are evaluated based on their overall GPA and their science GPA, performance on the MCAT (or in some cases the GRE or DAT), extracurricular and community activities, and a personal interview. An overall GPA and a science GPA of 3.25 is considered minimum, however the admission criterion does vary between the various colleges. Applicants should obtain the D.P.M. college catalog for specific requirements of each of the eight programs of interest.

All eight of the colleges of podiatric medicine participate in a centralized application service through the American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine Application Service (AACPMAS). Students may apply to one, some, or all eight by submitting only one application. The AACPMAS collects and collates application data, computes GPA, and forwards standardized applications to all of the colleges. The AACPMAS begins processing applications approximately September 1st. The deadline for priority consideration is April 1, and the final application deadline is July 31st of each year for Fall admission of the same year. Application packets can be downloaded at www.e-aacpmas.org.

The minimum course requirements for colleges of podiatric medicine are essentially the same as for most doctoral medical programs. This curriculum includes science–major laboratory coursework in biology (12 hours), general or inorganic chemistry (8 hours), organic chemistry (8 hours), biochemistry (4 hours), physics (8 hours) and English (6-12 hours).  Additional coursework in comparative vertebrate anatomy, genetics, cell and molecular biology, physiology, microbiology, embryology, advanced mathematics, and psychology are highly recommended.

In addition to the majors in the Physical and Biological Sciences, other disciplines, such as anthropology, community studies, sociology, and psychology may offer a variety of interesting courses appropriate for students interested in podiatry school. However, if you choose a major outside of the Physical and Biological Science area you must include the basic science requirements for medical school along with satisfying requirements appropriate for your major.  A widespread misconception suggesting it is necessary to major in a science, especially biology, or that podiatry schools prefer science majors is not accurate. The truth is that a majority of podiatry school applicants are natural science majors, but any academic major is suitable and acceptable for medical school as long as the prerequisite coursework is complete.

Serious students seeking career opportunities in the field of Podiatric Medicine should seek advisement from the Office of Medical & Allied Health Programs. The specialized sequence of coursework meets basic prerequisite needs of the D.P.M. programs within the scope of a generalized natural science major and minor. This approach provides the greatest flexibility for alternative strategies should they be necessary.

The pre-podiatry curriculum listed here serves to as a guide for the biology major / chemistry minor. Other academic majors and minors can be used, but may require more coursework than the usual 120-hour baccalaureate.

Bachelor of Science
Major in Biology, Minor in Chemistry
Podiatry Track

3 Digit to 4 Digit Crosswalk
SHSU Course NumberHoursRecommended Sequence
Core Curriculum
Component Area I (Communication) 6 Freshman
Component Area II (Mathematics) 3 Freshman
Component Area III (Natural Sciences) 8 Freshman
Component Area IV    
          (Visual & Performing Arts) 3 Freshman
          (Literature/Philosophy) 3 Sophomore
          (Cultural Studies) 3 Sophomore
Component Area V (Social/Behavioral Sciences) 15 Freshman, Sophomore, Junior
Component Area VI (Institutionally Designated Option) 1 Freshman
Degree Specific Requirements
Major Core3
BIO 161/111 <BIOL 1311/1111>, BIO 162/1121 <BIOL 1313/1113> 8 Freshman
CHM 138/118<CHEM 1311/1111>, CHM 139/119 <CHEM 1312/1112> 8 Freshman
MTH 1641<MATH 1410>, MTH 142 <MATH 1420> 7 Freshman
BIO 244 <BIOL 2440>, BIO 345 <BIOL 3450> 8 Freshman
BIO 340 <BIOL 3409> 4 Junior, Senior
CHM 238/218 <CHEM 2323/2123>, CHM 239/CHM 219 <CHEM 2325/2125> 8 Sophomore
MTH 379 <MATH 3379> 3 Sophomore
PHY 138/118 <PHYS 1301/1101>, PHY 139/119 <PHYS 1302/1102> 8 Sophomore
BIO 347 <BIOL 3470> 4 Junior
BIO 342 <BIOL 3420>, BIO 344 <BIOL 3440> 8 Junior
BIO 410 <BIOL 4110>, BIO 411 <BIOL 4111> 2 Senior
Minor Core3
CHM 241 <CHEM 2401>, CHM 348 <CHEM 3438> 8 Junior
CHM 339 <CHEM 3339> 3 Senior
Major Electives
Choose any three (3) of the following courses: 
BIO 346 <BIOL 3460>, BIO 348 <BIOL 3480>, BIO 349 <3490>, BIO 435 <BIOL 4350>, BIO 436 <BIOL 4360>, BIO 438 <BIOL 4368>, BIO 446 <BIOL 4460>, BIO 449 <BIOL 4490>, BIO 493 <BIOL 4493>
10-12 Junior / Senior
Total Hours: 120-3

Notes: 

1Meets the requirements of Component Area III, Natural Sciences

3The same course(s) may not be used to satisfy both major & minor requirements (no double dipping of courses).

Academic Preparation for Admission into Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.) Programs

The Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges website, www.aavmc.org, lists 28 accredited schools and colleges of veterinary medicine in the United States. Nearly 25% of the nation’s veterinarians work in areas other than private practice, such as government and corporate veterinary medicine. The profession of veterinary medicine has never been more important, more exciting, or more promising as a satisfying professional career. The only program in Texas is at Texas is Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine in College Station. Admission requirements typically follow those of most any medical program consisting of natural science coursework.Texas A & M does not require a bachelor’s degree for admission, but because of the competition, a bachelor’s degree is highly recommended. Most of the Veterinary Medical programs in the United States accept approximately 50–130 students each year who typically have an overall GPA of 3.5, a science GPA of 3.5 and competitive composite scores on the GRE. Any grade less than ‘C’ in a prerequisite course is considered unacceptable. 

Serious students seeking career opportunities in the field of Veterinary Medicine should seek advisement from the Office of Medical & Allied Health Programs. The specialized sequence of coursework meets basic prerequisite needs of the D.P.M. programs within the scope of a generalized natural science major and minor. This approach provides the greatest flexibility for alternative strategies should they be necessary.

The pre-veterinary medical curriculum listed here serves to as a guide for the biology major / chemistry minor. Other academic majors and minors can be used, but may require more coursework than the usual 120-hour baccalaureate.

Bachelor of Science
Major in Biology, Minor in Chemistry
Veterinary Medical Track

3 Digit to 4 Digit Crosswalk
SHSU Course NumberHoursRecommended Sequence
Core Curriculum
Component Area I (Communication) 6 Freshman
Component Area II (Mathematics) 3 Freshman
Component Area III (Natural Sciences) 8 Freshman
Component Area IV    
          (Visual & Performing Arts) 3 Freshman
          (Literature/Philosophy) 3 Sophomore
          (Cultural Studies) 3 Sophomore
Component Area V (Social/Behavioral Sciences) 15 Freshman, Sophomore, Junior
Component Area VI (Institutionally Designated Option) 1 Freshman
Degree Specific Requirements
Major Core2
BIO 161/111 <BIOL 1311/1111>, BIO 162/1121 <BIOL 1312/1113> 8 Freshman
CHM 138/118<CHEM 1311/1111>, CHM 139/119 <CHEM 312/1112> 8 Freshman
MTH 141 <MATH 1410>, MTH 142 <MATH 1420> 7 Freshman
BIO 244 <BIOL 2440>, BIO 345 <BIOL 3450> 8 Freshman
BIO 340 <BIOL 3409> 4 Sophomore
CHM 238/218 <CHEM 2323/2123>, CHM 239/CHM 219 <CHEM 2325/2125> 8 Sophomore
MTH 379 MTH 379 <MATH 3379> 3 Sophomore
PHY 138/118 <PHYS 1301/1101>, PHY 139/119 <PHYS 1302/1102> 8 Sophomore
BIO 347 <BIOL 3470> 4 Junior
BIO 342 <BIOL 3420>, BIO 344 <BIOL 3440> 8 Junior
BIO 410 <BIOL 4110>, BIO 411 <BIOL 4111> 2 Senior
Minor Core2
CHM 241 <CHEM 2401>, CHM 348 <CHEM 3438> 8 Junior
CHM 339 <CHEM 3339> 3 Senior
Major Electives
Choose any three (3) of the following courses: 
BIO 346 <BIOL 3460>, BIO 348 <BIOL 3480>, BIO 349 <3490>, BIO 435 <BIOL 4350>, BIO 436 <BIOL 4360>, BIO 438 <BIOL 4368>, BIO 446 <BIOL 4460>, BIO 449 <BIOL 4490>, BIO 493 <BIOL 4493>
10-12 Junior / Senior
Program Track Requirements
AGR 169 <ARGI 1319>, COM 282 <COMS 2382>, ENG 330 <ENGL 3330>, AGR 373 <AGRI 3373>
Total Hours: 120-3  

Notes: 

1Meets the requirements of Component Area III, Natural Sciences

2MTH 163 <MATH 1316> fulfills the requirement of Component Area II, Mathematics

3The same course(s) may not be used to satisfy both major & minor requirements (no double dipping of courses).


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