Course Descriptions

ACCOUNTING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ACC 533 <ACCT 5333> Financial Statement Analysis.
An overview of the pertinent theoretics and various applications relevant to the analysis of financial statements by applying both finance and accounting principles. Readings and case studies applied to provide a contemporary prospective. Prerequisites: Admission to the MS in Accounting program.

ACC 535 <ACCT 5302> Financial Reporting and Business Decisions.
This course involves the study and examination of financial reporting from the point of view of management, creditors, and investors. The course specifically addresses how financing, investing, and operating decisions affect financial statements. The course also covers how creditors and investors use financial statements to assess the results of managers’ decisions and the effect of alternative accounting methods on the quality of financial reporting. The course emphasizes the effect of internal accounting decisions on external financing and business decision making. The course is designed for non-Accounting majors.

ACC 564 <ACCT 5304> Accounting for Management.
This course provides an examination and application of the concepts useful to management in the analysis of accounting data for the purposes of costing and income determination, decision making and control. The course typically includes readings, cases and discussion of planning and budgeting, activity based costing, target costing, performance measurement, quality and environmental cost management. This course is designed for non-accounting majors. Prerequisites: ACC 231 and 232 or ACC 530.

ACC 568 <ACCT 5336> Government and Not-For-Profit Accounting.
This course provides an overview of financial accounting and reporting for governmental and not-for-profit entities. Governmental accounting coverage comprises fund accounting, budgeting and control, revenue recognition in governmental funds, accounting for business-type and fiduciary activities, fund-level and government-wide financial reporting, and governmental auditing. Accounting for private not-for-profit organizations (including charitable organizations, colleges and universities, and health-care entities) covers special issues such as accounting for contributions, classifications of net assets, and industry specific reporting. Prerequisites:  Admission to the MS in Accounting program.

ACC 569 <ACCT 5347> Managerial Accounting Applications.
Study and examination of managerial accounting applications that address contemporary managerial issues and problems. Topics include activity based costing, target costing, quality costs, environmental costing, capacity costing, theory of constraints, costing for lean production, and other areas. Cases and exercises are used to provide professional practice and experience in the development and use of management accounting information for decision making and the role of the management accountant as part of the management decision making team. Prerequisites: Admission to the MS in Accounting Program.

ACC 575 <ACCT 5380> Readings in Accounting.
Directed study in special topics in accounting. Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair and Graduate Coordinator.

ACC 580 <ACCT 5311> Advanced Topics in Financial Reporting.
Financial accounting concepts, researching financial accounting standards, current pronouncements and application of principles to practical problems are studied. Emphasis is given to contemporary accounting literature related to current financial reporting problems. This course is designed to enhance research skills, analytical thinking skills, and written and oral communication skills. Prerequisite: Admission to the MS in Accounting Program.

ACCT 5315 Seminar in Accounting Theory.
This course is a study of accounting theory, as well as a critical analysis of the history of the development of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Students will research the accounting literature, with the objective of critically evaluating the present status and future course of accounting thought. The course examines theoretical approaches to the solution of current problems in financial reporting. Prerequisite: Admission to the MS in Accounting program. Credit: 3.

ACC 582 <ACCT 5324> Information Systems Audit and Assurance.
This course provides the linkage between auditing concepts and professional standards and their application to information system principles, processing, and control. Professional practice and experience in the use of the computer as an audit tool is introduced through the use of Generalized Audit Software. This course provides students with an understanding and hands on familiarity with skills necessary to assess controls over computerized information systems and to accomplish computer assisted auditing procedures to render an opinion regarding the integrity of financial information produced by those systems. Knowledge of these concepts will help prepare the student to practice in a technologically enhanced auditing environment. Prerequisites: Admission to the MS in Accounting Program.

ACC 584 <ACCT 5352> Corporate and Pass-Through Entity Taxation.
A study of the Internal Revenue Code and related tax literature associated with corporate and pass through entity taxation. Students will learn the concepts of forming, operating and liquidating C Corporations, S Corporations, LLCs and Partnerships. Federal tax returns are prepared for C Corporations, S Corporations and Partnerships. Tax research is emphasized and integrated into each of the above areas. Students will obtain proficiency in the use of various internet and paper based tax services and in the examination of related contemporary accounting literature. Prerequisites: Admission to the MS in Accounting program.

ACC 586 <ACCT 5379> Professional Ethics and Responsibility.
This course provides prospective accounting professionals an ability to apply philosophic moral theory to particular issues pertaining to the accounting profession. The course includes the examination of contemporary accounting literature related to ethical standards, ethical reasoning, integrity, objectivity, independence, and other core values. Emphasis is placed on dealing with controversial issues and examining the legal and professional responsibilities of public accountants. Topics also included are the examination of the state and AICPA Code of Professional Conduct and other governing authorities pronouncements, such as SEC, IRS, and similar such bodies. Case studies and exercises with professional responsibility and ethical considerations in “real life” situations are interspersed throughout the curriculum. Prerequisites: Admission to the MS in Accounting program and concurrent enrollment in ACC 599.

ACC 587 <ACCT 5355> Estate Planning, Trusts, and Nonprofits.
Concepts of estate planning to enable tax minimized transmittal of property from one generation to the next generation or beyond. Topics to include: lifetime gifts, successive life estates, use of trusts, estate tax technical issues, tax research, formation and use of family partnerships, corporations, LLCs, and other business forms in conjunction with estate planning. Understanding of charitable entities/devices and their opportunities in estate planning. Exposure to other not for profit tax entities and their return problems. Understanding and preparation of federal tax forms 709, 706, 1041, and other related forms, including Texas related forms as applicable. Understanding of community property concepts related to estate planning issues. Understanding of property issues as related to estate planning issues. Understanding and proper use of trust devices and potential tax impact (both estate and income taxation). Prerequisites: Admission to the MS in Accounting program.

ACC 595 <ACCT 5375> ERP Business Process Integration.
This course utilizes the SAP R/3 information system paradigm as a model for examination and development of integrated business process solutions. The course examines the conceptual background, rationale, methods, and procedures commonly employed by businesses in developing and configuring integrated business systems. Cases and hands-on experience using SAP R/3 require students to configure a business process solution through integration of financial, controlling, production, materials management, sales and distribution, manufacturing, and other ERP process modules. Prerequisites: Thirty-six hours of business related courses of which twelve must be at the graduate level, completion of the MBA core courses and ACC 564 <ACCT 5304> or ACC 569, or permission of the instructor.

ACC 599 <ACCT 5399> Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice.
This course examines the theoretical and application issues of contemporary auditing as identified in the literature and by recent professional pronouncements. Topics include internal control, control risk, legal liability of auditors, audit failure, audit risk, auditor responsibility for detection of fraud, and the evolving nature of the auditing profession in compliance with new audit standards. Case studies and exercises are used to address these and other topics of importance to professional auditing practice. Prerequisite: ACC 582, graduate standing, and admission to the MS in Accounting Program.

 


 

AGRICULTURE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

AGRI 5300 <AGR 530> Advanced Fusing and Joining Metallic and Non-Metallic Materials.
Principles and techniques of bonding and fusing metallic materials by the electric and oxyacetylene processes. Study of fluxes, chemicals, and oxidants used in joining metal. Joining of non-metallic materials by mechanical and chemical means.

AGRI 5310 <AGR 531> Mechanized Harvesting and Handling of Agricultural Products.
Fundamentals of selection, service, and operation of agricultural harvesting machines. Analysis and development of mechanical systems to feed and care for livestock. Storage and handling facilities for agricultural products.

AGRI 5330 <AGR 533> Advanced Rural Utilities.
Selection and use of electrical equipment as related to efficiency and economy in agricultural production, processing and storage of feeds, forage crops and grain in connection with livestock enterprises.

AGRI 5340 <AGR 540> Advanced Animal Growth and Performance.
This course is an advanced study of physiological and endocrine factors affecting growth and performance of domestic animals.  The course includes the study of meat animal growth and developmental processes as they affect body and carcass composition, carcass quality and retail value.  Prerequisite:  Graduate standing.  Credit 3.

AGRI 5350 <AGR 535> Advanced Principles of Livestock Management.
Survey of current knowledge and concepts of beef production with emphasis on the stocker/feedlot segment. Includes feeding, management, marketing and disease control of stocker and feedlot cattle.

AGRI 5360 <AGR 536> Contemporary Issues in Agricultural Business.
Analysis and discussion of current issues in agricultural business with appropriate principles and theories. Issues may include marketing, management, finance, policy, international, legal and ethical topics. Student participation is expected via reports throughout the semester or term reports.

AGRI 5360 <AGR 560> Agricultural Policy.
Advanced analysis of government policies and programs important to agriculture. Topics include: the policy making process and leaders, interest groups, organization and functions of federal and state agencies, policies relevant to production agriculture and natural resources, rural development, consumer and food safety, international marketing and food distribution.

AGRI 5362 <AGR 562> Principles of Crop Protection.
Diagnosis, epidemiology, and control of plant pests. Causative and limiting factors are stressed. Designed for prospective or practicing teachers and technicians in the agro-chemical industry or in federal or state plant pest control agencies.

AGRI 5364 <AGR 564> Agricultural Internship. A directed study utilizing industry to develop an understanding of agricultural production and management principles.

AGRI 5369 <AGR 569> Special Topics in Agricultural Science.
This course will examine advanced special topics/issues and (or) subject matter in the field of Agricultural Science.  The sub-divisional fields offered are: Agriculture, Animal Science, Agricultural Business, Horticulture and Crop Science, and Agricultural Mechanization.  This course may be repeated as topics and subject matter change.

AGRI 5370 <AGR 570> Food and Fiber Crops.
A study of traditional plant breeding techniques and an overview of contemporary crop improvement methods. The physiology, adaptation, classification, taxonomy, and utilization of major crop species used for production of food and fiber are covered. Genetic and environmental influences on crop quality are discussed.

AGRI 5375 <AGR 575> Statistical Methods in Agriculture.
Applications of statistical methods for making meaningful interpretations of qualitative and quantitative data from experiments in agriculture. Instruction includes sampling and randomization, correlation and regression, analysis of variance and testing of hypotheses of means and variances, and design of experiments in agriculture.

AGRI 5382 <AGR 582> Nutritional and Physiological Inter-Relationships.
Physiological functions of various body processes in domestic animals with emphasis on the metabolic relationships among minerals, vitamins, amino acids, fats, carbohydrates, enzymes, hormones and non-nutritive feed additives and the effect of nutritional antagonists.

AGRI 5386 <AGR 586> Capital Management in Agricultural Business.
This course provides an in-depth understanding of capital marketing, capital budgeting, financial planning, and appraisal principles important in the field of agribusiness.

AGRI 5398 <AGR 598> Economics of Agricultural Production.
Agricultural production principles applied to the use of resources; cost analyses of production enterprises; linear programming of enterprises for maximizing returns; elements of depreciation schedules; evaluation for income tax purposes.

AGRI 6140 <AGR 614> Graduate Seminar.
This course is designed to provide students a forum for presentation of their graduate project and to provide an opportunity for faculty to present seminars relative to contemporary issues in agriculture. The project is an agreement between student and his/her committee. Course cannot be repeated.

AGRI 6350 <AGR 635> Techniques and Interpretation of Research.
A course designed to develop the competencies needed to interpret and utilize agricultural research. Topics will include: the philosophy of the scientific method, formats for agricultural research data, interpretation of data, and application of information to specific situations.

AGRI 6398 <AGR 698> Thesis.
In addition to the preliminary study of the techniques of research, these courses involve completion of a bibliography, organization of material, selection of a suitable problem, a digest of related literature, selection of appropriate procedures, formulation of a plan of investigating and reporting, collection and organization of data, and the writing of the thesis. Grade is either Credit or No Credit once completed.

AGRI 6099 <AGR 699> Thesis.
In addition to the preliminary study of the techniques of research, these courses involve completion of a bibliography, organization of material, selection of a suitable problem, a digest of related literature, selection of appropriate procedures, formulation of a plan of investigating and reporting, collection and organization of data, and the writing of the thesis. Variable Credit: 3 hrs, first semester; 1 hour subsequent semesters. Grade is either Credit or No Credit on completed.


 

ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ASE 510 <EDAD 5110> School Administrator Workshop.
This course deals with current topics in school administration. One semester hour is earned and the course may be repeated for a maximum of three hours. NOTE: Maximum of three hours workshop coursework allowed in a student’s program.

ASE 532 <EDAD 5332> Administration and Organization of Public Schools.
This introductory course deals with the basic activities of educational management, theories and concepts, organization, and governance of the public schools.

ASE 560 <HIED 5360> Organization and Administration of Higher Education.

ASE 561 <HIED 5361> Contemporary Issues in Higher Education.

ASE 562 <HIED 5362> Resource Development and Allocation in Higher Education.

ASE 563 <HIED 5363> Information Technology in Higher Education.

ASE 564 <HIED 5364> Leadership in Higher Education.

ASE 572 <EDAD 5372> Federal, State, and Local School Law.
The course provides a study of the legal basis of school control; the relation of the federal government to public education, the state as the fundamental legal unit in organization and administration of a state system of schools; the district as the unit of local school control; and legal duties and responsibilities of the state and local boards of education.

ASE 578 <EDAD 5378> Curriculum Planning.
This course provides a study of the various factors which influence curriculum change; the role and responsibilities of different personnel and agencies in curriculum planning; procedures in implementing curriculum change; and current programs in public school curriculum K-12.

ASE 579 <EDAD 5379> Methods of Research.
Study is made of types and methods of educational research, the collecting, analyzing and sharing of data with the public. The student is expected to complete a research project or field study utilizing appropriate methods of educational research.

ASE 586 <EDAD 5386> Special Populations and Special Programs.
Study is made of special programs offered in public schools including special and compensatory education, bilingual and ESL education, adult and continuing education, and vocational and technical education.

ASE 587 <EDAD 5387> Workshop in Education.
The topic(s) included will vary with academic program and semester offered. Note: Maximum of six hours of coursework allowed in a student’s program.

ASE 610 <EDAD 6110> Workshop in Educational Leadership.
This course deals with current topics in educational leadership. The topics selected for the workshop will be based on needs identified through collaborative endeavors with schools, service centers, professional organizations and governmental agencies. The course may be repeated for a maximum of three hours. NOTE: Maximum of three hours workshop coursework allowed in a student’s program.

ASE 660 <EDAD 6360> Psychology of Learning.
Study is made of the principles of psychology as they apply to learning and teaching. Pertinent research is studied in an attempt to find ways to make instruction more effective.

ASE 662 <EDAD 6362> Campus Leadership (Internship).
This laboratory course is designed to provide intensive study and field experience in problems relating to a specific job at the elementary, middle or senior high school level. Last course to be taken in the sequence of courses. May be taken with one to two other courses.

ASE 668 <EDAD 6368> Instructional Leadership I.
The course focuses on leadership for the improvement of instruction and includes current research on school and teaching effectiveness.

ASE 670 <EDAD 6370> Campus Business Management.
This course provides candidates with the skills to understand basic campus accounting and budgetary functions as well as the management of the school facility/plant. This course deals with basic concepts of management of campus activity funds, personnel accounting, instructional budgetary functions, translating student academic needs into the budget, public finance; and problems in local, state, and federal support of education.

ASE 671 <EDAD 6371> Role of the Principal in School Administration.
This course is designed for school administrators and supervisors. Consideration is given to organization, program curriculum, plant supervision, and evaluation for the principal functioning at the elementary, middle or senior high school level. Prerequisite: ASE 532 <EDAD 5332> and ASE 668.

ASE 672 <HIED 6372> Practicum in Instructional Leadership.
This course provides a field practicum for students seeking a position as an instructional supervisor. It is designed to provide intensive study of the field of instructional leadership. Last course to be taken in the sequence of courses. May be taken with one to two other courses.

ASE 675 <EDAD 6375> Women in Educational Leadership.
This course addresses issues and challenges of particular interest to women in educational leadership positions. It is designed to encourage prospective women administrators by enhancing leadership, interpersonal and motivational skills.

ASE 678 <EDAD 6378> Building Capacities for Teaching and Learning.
This course addresses the development of effective leadership strategies to improve student achievement through curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development.

ASE 679 <EDAD 6379> Program Evaluation for School Improvement.
This course provides candidates with the skills to develop an understanding of the program evaluation process for overall school improvement and become critical consumers of research to guide decision-making; access resources, databases, and best practice models to inform effective leadership; and effectively use student assessment data to promote academic achievement and intervention programs.

ASE 680 <EDAD 6380> Executive Leadership for Superintendents.
This course provides candidates with the skills to assume the role of the contemporary superintendent or head of schools. This course consists of topics, content, and independent inquiry that address the specific and unique leadership needs of districts.

ASE 681 <EDAD 6381> District Business and Financial Management.
This course provides candidates with the skills to understand basic district accounting and budgetary functions as well as the management of district facilities. This course deals with basic concepts of management of campus activity funds, personnel accounting, instructional budgetary functions, translating student academic needs into the budget, public finance; problems in local, state, and federal support of education, state financial systems, with emphasis on Texas; local taxation; budgeting; financing capital items; and fiscal management.

ASE 682 <EDAD 6382> Human Resource Management.
Study is made of the administrator’s role in recruiting and retaining adequate staff. Such topics as recruitment, salary policy, tenure, leaves, contractual obligations, and academic freedom are considered. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Principalship core coursework.

ASE 683 <EDAD 6383> Practicum for Superintendents I.
The course provides a study of the duties and responsibilities of the school administrator as related to public relations, personnel administration, instructional leadership, financial management and school plant planning. Last course to be taken in the sequence of courses. May be taken with one to two other courses.

ASE 684 <EDAD 6384> Practicum for Superintendents II.
This course provides specific opportunities, independent inquiry, and experiences that are necessary for the dispositional and affective elements of the superintendency as candidates learn to manage organizational behavior and district performance.

ASE 685 <EDAD 6385> Culturally Proficient Leadership.
In this course leadership candidates will develop an understanding of how organizational culture and climate intersects with diverse subcultures in the school and school community. Candidates will reflect on their own cultural biases and collect data on school culture, climate, and community to develop action plans that address need areas. Candidates will explore the application of organizational, communication, multicultural, and cultural proficiency theories and models to day-to-day practice.

ASE 687 <EDAD 6387> Field Studies in Educational Administration.
This course provides candidates an opportunity to engage in a detailed field study under the direction of graduate faculty. The topic and area of study must be approved by the supervising faculty member.

ASE 690 <EDAD 6390> The School Plant.
The course is designed for school superintendents, business managers, and other school personnel whose responsibilities include school plant planning and management. Topics considered include how to use and maintain present school plants, keeping the school board and community informed as to building needs, selecting architects, and financing construction, and the developing educational specifications.

ASE 694 <EDAD 6394> Instructional Leadership II.
This course is designed to certify individuals as having completed Instructional Leadership Development. Emphasis is also placed on the improvement of instruction through research findings and demonstration of instructional improvement in various curricular offerings.

ASE 696 <EDAD 6396> Appraisal and Development of Educational Personnel.
This course is designed to prepare individuals to assess the effectiveness of instruction. Emphasis is also placed on evaluation techniques, conferencing with teachers and development of professional growth plans.

ASE 697 <EDAD 6397> Current Issues for School Administrators.
This course will provide practicing and prospective school administrators an opportunity to become current with state and national education issues. These issues will include school finance, school law, special programs, leadership and management, instructional issues, evaluation of programs and personnel, and changing policies at the state and national level.

 


 

BUSINESS ANALYSIS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

BAN 530 <BANA 5300> Quantitative Tools for Business.
An introduction to a variety of quantitative tools used in the business sector. Emphasis will be placed on statistical analyses and operations. Topics include descriptive statistics, normal distribution theory, central limit theorem, estimation, hypothesis testing, linear programming, forecasting, inventory management, JIT, productivity, competitiveness & strategy, aggregate planning, and facilities layout. This course does not apply to the 36-hour graduate credit hour requirement of the MBA degree program or the MS in Finance degree.

BAN 568 <BANA 5368> Techniques of Statistical Analysis.
An integration of the concepts and application of statistical and quantitative techniques currently used in business decision making. Readings in the current literature related to statistical inference, ANOVA, correlation, simple linear regression, multiple regression, questionnaire construction and analysis will be covered.

BAN 575 <BANA 5380> Readings in Business Analysis.
A directed study for individual students who wish intensive work in a special topic area of business analysis. Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair and Graduate Coordinator.


 

BIOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

BIOL 5200 <BIO 520> Professional Aspects of Science.
An essential course on scientific professionalism for the beginning M.S. student. This course provides students with an introduction to the professional and ethical responsibilities of scientists. Students will also discuss philosophical and controversial issues in academia and science, as well as political issues that may influence the process and practice of science. Most importantly, this course encourages and helps students to develop skills needed for presenting their research to fellow scientists through the processes of publishing, giving conference presentations, writing grant proposals, and becoming active in the scientific community. Required of all graduate students in Biology. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Credit 2.

BIOL 5305 BIO 530 Forensic Entomology.
The methods and materials necessary for use of insects as forensic evidence in legal investigation will be discussed. Laboratory included. Prerequisites: introductory entomology and graduate standing. Credit 3.

BIOL 5310 BIO 531 Classification and Natural History of Plants.
Classification and natural history of major groups of nonvascular and vascular plants are presented. Emphasis is on morphological recognition, ecological and physiological differences and economic importance of major taxa. Laboratory included. Prerequisites: Introductory Botany course and graduate standing. Credit 3.

BIOL5320 Statistical Design and Analyses in Biology

This course surveys various experimental designs and associated statistical analyses common in biology.   Using primarily the general linear model, we will explore in detail appropriate designs for the following statistical applications: independent t-test, Analysis of Variance, block, multivariate, paired t-test, repeated measures, correlation, regression, Analysis of Covariance, ordination, clustering, randomization, and goodness of fit.  The class will consist of lecture, practical exercises in analyzing data (using SAS, SPSS, or another comparable analytical program), and class discussion of experimental designs published in the primary literature.   This course is meant to be a follow up to Biostatistics (BIOL4374) in that the basic statistical theory will not be presented.  Rather, this course will focus on the practical use of experimental design for analyzing and interpretation data.   Grading in this class will be based on exams and individual practical exercises. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the Department of Biological Sciences and Biostatistics BIOL4374 (or equivalent), or special permission by instructor. Credit 3

BIOL 5340 <BIO 534> Electron Microscopy.
This course is designed to teach students the methods of preparing specimens for electron microscope analysis and to use the electron microscope as a tool to conduct research. Students will become competent in using the electron microscope for visual analysis or chemical elemental analysis. Prerequisites: 12 hours advanced biology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5350 <BIO 535> Plant Evolutionary Biology.
The developmental program of many plants is sufficiently plastic to allow a suite of evolutionary scenarios not encountered in other major lineages. Mechanisms such as hybridization, polyploidy, somaclonal variation, chromosomal rearrangement, and the evolution of diverse and unique breeding systems have allowed plants to thrive in every terrestrial biome.  Additionally, many of these mechanisms allow for rapid evolution that can be documented over the span of a few generations.  This course will cover the myriad ways in which plants have diversified from their endosymbiotic ancestors as well as the hallmarks of evolution that characterize major plant  lineages.  Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the Department of Biological Sciences and an introductory course in botany. Credit 3.

BIO 5360 <BIO 536> Principles of Systematics.
Systematics is the study of biological diversity, encompassing the evolutionary origins of this diversity and the construction of classification systems that recognize evolutionary lineages.  This course will cover the history and philosophy of classification as a whole, from the development of nomenclature to modern techniques of molecular phylogenetics.  Topics will include species concepts, nomenclature, interpreting and inferring phylogenies from many kinds of data, the use of DNA databases, DNA barcoding and alternatives to the Linnaean system of nomenclature.  Prerequisites: Graduate standing and an introductory course in statistics. Credit 3.

BIO 5362 <BIO 562> Advanced Plant Physiology.
Further studies of the life processes of plants at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels with focus on current research and recent advances in this field. A scholarly paper on a selected physiological topic is required. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: 12 hours advanced biology. Credit 3.

BIO 5480 <BIO 548> Comparative Animal Physiology.
A study of the physiological adaptive mechanisms and the comparison of adaptive strategies across vertebrate taxa. Emphasis will be directed toward homeostatic mechanisms of water, energy and electrolyte balance, and metabolism. A two-hour laboratory to emphasize investigative skills employing modern laboratory techniques is included. Independent original research project required. Prerequisites: organic chemistry, general physiology, or instructor's consent. Credit 4.

BIOL 5364 <BIO 564>Cell Structure and Physiology.
A study of signal transduction pathways in the cell. For the laboratory portion of the course, students will conduct independent investigations of cells defective in signal transduction and prepare a scientific paper of the results. Prerequisites: cell biology and organic chemistry. Credit 3.

BIOL 5368 <BIO 568> Advanced Invertebrate Zoology.
Invertebrates are the dominant form of life on earth, comprising greater than 75% of all described species. Students will be briefly introduced to the phylum/class level characteristics of the major groups of invertebrate animals. The majority of the course will deal with the evolutionary history and phylogeny of invertebrates, invertebrate ecology, and the myriad solutions invertebrates have evolved to deal with the common problems of reproduction, feeding, osmoregulation, respiration, locomotion and developmental patterns. Prerequisites: 12 hours advanced biology, invertebrate zoology recommended. Credit 3.

BIOL 5371 <BIO 571> Evolution.
This course is concerned with modern concepts of the evolution of organisms. Extended reading and classroom discussion supplement the lecture treatment. Three one-hour lectures a week are scheduled. Prerequisite: introductory genetics. Credit 3.

BIOL 5375 <BIO 575>Bacterial Physiology.
A study of bacterial metabolism that will include fermentation, anaerobic respiration, bacterial photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation. This course will also discuss how bacteria sense their environment and adjust their metabolism accordingly. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: microbiology, genetics, and organic chemistry II or general physiology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5378 <BIO 578> Virology.
A study of viruses that infect plants, animals, and bacteria. Areas considered include chemical and structural properties of viruses, virus-host relations, and infection and growth phenomena, including interference and regulation. Also included are the roles of viruses as agents of disease and malignancy, and as gene vectors in natural settings, but also as tools in biotechnology and gene therapy. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: microbiology, genetics, and organic chemistry. Credit 3.

BIOL 5380 <BIO 580> Advanced Ecology.
An advanced theoretical and practical study of biotic and abiotic ecosystem interactions encompassing the physiology of individuals, growth of populations including social and species interactions within populations, analysis of population composition and change, the distribution of communities, and the functioning of ecosystems. Independent study of a selected ecological topic required. Prerequisites: general chemistry I and II, general ecology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5381 <BIO 581>Ecological Computer Modeling.
An introduction to the development and application of computer models in ecology and population biology. Principles of modeling, programming concepts, specific model dynamics, and prepackaged computer models will be explored. Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: general ecology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5382 <BIO 582> Ichthyology.
Ichthyology will introduce general concepts in biology, taxonomy, systematics, evolution, zoogeography and ecology of fishes.   Students will learn the characteristics and identifying features for most of the dominant fish families on Earth.  Moreover, students will leave with a working knowledge on the taxonomy and nomenclature of the marine and freshwater fishes of Texas as well as the skills necessary to identify fishes from across the globe. This class includes a 2-hour weekly laboratory and field work.   Credit 3.

BIOL 5383 <BIO 583>Herpetology.
An introduction to the biology of amphibians and reptiles and one of the most important evolutionary events in natural history: the rise and diversification of terrestrial vertebrates. A comprehensive introduction will address the taxonomy, systematics, evolution, anatomy, physiology, ecology, distribution, and natural history of these unique vertebrates. Upon completion of this course, students will understand and appreciate why amphibians and reptiles serve as excellent biological models in research, and will become familiar with the major research questions and programs in herpetology. A laboratory and field component will introduce students to a variety of sampling and collecting techniques. Common museum practices for specimen preservation and documentation will also be addressed. Although regional species will receive the most emphasis, this course will address the biology of all amphibians and reptiles. Two-hour laboratory plus field work. Prerequisites: introductory biology plus 12 hours advanced biology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5384 <BIO 584> Ornithology.
The classification evolution, anatomy, physiology, ecology, behavior and conservation of birds are studied in this course. Laboratories include general anatomy, taxonomy, identification and field techniques used in the study of behavior and migration. Laboratories may include independent research projects related to topics discussed in this course. Two-hour laboratory plus field work. Prerequisites: introductory biology plus 12 hours advanced biology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5385 <BIO 585> Mammalogy.
The taxonomy, systematics, anatomy, ecology, distribution, and life history of mammals are studied in this course. Laboratories include general taxonomy, identification, and field techniques. Two-hour laboratory plus field work. Prerequisites: introductory biology plus 12 hours advanced biology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5390 <BIO 590> Limnology.
This class examines physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of freshwater stream and lake ecosystems.  Limnological techniques are stressed with special emphasis on physiochemical conditions of freshwater environments and their effects on aquatic life. Plankton analysis, a study of bottom fauna, lake and stream mapping and evaluation of aquatic productivity are included. Two-hour laboratory plus field work. Prerequisites: 8 hours college chemistry plus 12 hours advanced biology. Credit 3.

BIOL 5391 <BIO 591> Advanced Genetics.
This is an advanced study of the principles of heredity and the nature and function of the gene. Emphasis will be on molecular genetics with special attention to recent advances in DNA technologies. Laboratory studies include completion of a mini-research project and preparation of a scientific paper. Two-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: introductory genetics with grade of C or better and organic chemistry. Credit 3.

BIOL 5394 <BIO 594> Special Topics in Graduate Biology.
This course of Graduate Faculty-led study is designed to provide exposure of graduate students to new biological topics and concepts in a course setting, prior to that course's formal Department, College, and University course adoption. This course may be repeated for different Advanced Special Topics (different courses). Prerequisite: graduate standing in the Department of Biological Sciences or consent of the instructor.

BIOL 5095 <BIO 595> Special Graduate Topics in Biology.
This course is designed to provide an avenue for selected graduate students to engage in independent studies. Registration is on an individual basis but is limited to students in residence. A topic of study is selected and approved by the Biology faculty. Prerequisites: graduate standing in Biology and consent of department chair. Credit 3.

BIOL 5386 <BIO 596> Reproductive Physiology.
Physiological control of animal reproduction is the subject of this course. Current literature relating to this subject is critically examined and evaluated. An individual research problem is undertaken by the student. Two-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: introductory courses in physiology and organic chemistry. Credit 3.

BIOL 6398 <BIO 698> Thesis. Credit 3.

BIOL 6099 <BIO 698> Thesis. Variable Credit 1 to 3.

 


 

BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

BSL 565 <BESL 5301> Applied Linguistics for Classroom Teachers.
This course relates to the language sciences as they apply to formal and informal instruction. Language situations, descriptions, criteria, population, variations, and linguistic pressures are investigated. The nature of language, language teaching, language theory, and learning theory are examined in an attempt to provide a sound second language pedagogy.

BSL 571 <BESL 5302> Social, Cultural, and Language Influences on Learning.
This course is an integration of concepts fundamental to meeting the needs of students with diverse backgrounds. This course looks at language in its social and cultural contexts. It provides strategies to address the needs of second language learners from varied linguistic backgrounds. It examines sociocultural factors in the language classroom, interpersonal relations, concepts, models, and strategies for pluralistic teaching.

BSL 574 <BESL 5303> Teaching English as A Second Language: Oral Language Communication.
This course emphasizes the nature of language; the structure of language, the nature of first and second language acquisition; possible areas of interference; student motivation; trends in effective teaching materials and procedures; observation, testing and evaluation techniques; and the significance of culture.

BSL 575 <BESL 5380> Teaching the Language Arts and Reading in Spanish.
Emphasis is placed on the rationale, techniques, approaches, culture, activities, and methods of teaching reading in Spanish in the elementary bilingual classroom.

BSL 576 <BESL 6301> Bilingual Program Development in the Content Areas.
This course is designed to address basic teaching principles in the areas of science, mathematics, and social studies; the organization and structure of bilingual programs; guidelines for language usage; staffing, scheduling, and physical organization; and learning styles, teaching strategies and use of auxiliary personnel specific to the bilingual classroom.

BSL 577 <BESL 5304> Language Acquisition and Development for Bilingual and ESL Programs.
This course examines theories of second language acquisition as well as relationship between second language acquisition theory and language teaching. It compares and contrasts different theoretical perspectives of language, the learner, and the language learning process. It explores current research in the field of second language acquisition.

BSL 587 <BESL 6320> Workshop in Education: Bilingual Education.
The topic(s) included will vary with academic program and semester offered.

 


 

CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CI 533 <CIED 5333> Roles and Responsibilities of the Professional Educator.
This course is designed to assist teachers in understanding the structure, organization and management of public schools.  This will include school history, law, diversity, and special population. Prerequisites: CI 560 <CIED 5360> and CI 593 <CIED 5393> or SSED 383 and SED 464. Credit 3.

CI 560 <CIED 5360> Advanced Techniques and Methods of Instruction.
Study is made of current teaching techniques, strategies, and materials. Students will identify, research and develop approaches to problems pertaining to their teaching field. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CI 563 <CIED 5363> The Role of the Technology Liaison.

CI 565 <CIED 5365> Technology and Cognition.
The purpose of Technology and Cognition is to incorporate technology into teaching and learning in relation to the brain development in school-age children, emphasizing instructional techniques for enhancing learners' cognitive development through the use of technology. Students will design advanced technological applications for instruction, based upon best practices in technology and cognition. Prerequisite:  Graduate Standing.

CI 567 <CIED 5367> Readings and Trends in Instructional Technology.
This course acquaints students with the critical writings and ideas of prominent practitioners, researchers, and theorists in instructional technology with a focus on understanding the trends and issues pertaining to a scholarly study of integrating technology into instruction. Students will read and provide reflections regarding the best instructional technology strategies evident in the literature and in practice in PK-12 schools.

CI 569 <CIED 5369> Practicum for Technology Facilitation.
This course provides a field-based practicum in a school setting. Examination is made of the duties and responsibilities of the technology facilitator on a daily basis. Prerequisite: CI 567 <CIED 5367> , CS 583, CS 585, CS 587, and CS 589.

CI 570 <CIED 5370> Research in Teaching.
This course is designed for classroom teachers of all subject and grade levels. The focus of this course is to prepare teachers to read published research critically, to integrate those finding with personal experience in order to make reflective instructional decision and to participate in pedagogical research, theory-building, and elementary statistics. (Taught Fall Semester) Prerequisite: CI 583 <CIED 5383> and CI 584 <CIED 5384> .

CI 583 <CIED 5383> Integrating Current Technologies in Teaching.
Laboratory experiences are provided for graduate students in integrating technology into the curriculum. This course is recommended for both Education and non-Education majors.

CI 584 <CIED 5384> Curriculum Trends for Classroom Teachers.
Development of the public school curriculum and significant factors which help to determine the curriculum construction are studied. Opportunity to select and organize appropriate learning experiences for the different levels is offered.

CI 585 <CIED 5085> Current Issues in Education.
Analysis of opposing or varying viewpoints on educational issues of current concern is the main focus of the course. Examination of research literature, current data, experts in the various fields, and utilization of current technology in the examination of contemporary topics will be completed. Prerequisite: CI 570 <CIED 5370> (Taught Spring Semester).

CI 587 <CIED 5387> Workshop in Education.
This course is designed to explore the relation of brain development in school-age children and methods for enhancing this development through the use of technology. Students will have the opportunity to design instructional aides, which seamlessly implement developmentally appropriate technology in the classroom.

CI 590 <CIED 5390> Advanced Methods in Classroom Management and Discipline.
This course is designed for K-12 teachers of all subject areas. Increased proficiency in classroom management skills is the primary objective of the course. Teachers will be provided with an understanding of the factors influencing individual and group behavior in school settings; methods of diagnosing school and classroom factors that may be eliciting the problem; and the options available for influencing student behaviors. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CI 593 <CIED 5393> Assessment of Learning.
The focus of this course is research in current literature on strategies for the analysis of student work designed to improve instruction and student success. Students will develop skills in the use of a wide range of assessment strategies. Prerequisite: CI 560 <CIED 5360> and CI 597 <CIED 5397> or SED 374 and SED 494

CI 597 <CIED 5397> Human Growth and Development Across the Lifespan.
This course is designed to relate theory and research to present concerns and problems of teachers through the study of physiological psychological and social interrelationships. Advanced content in brain research as it effects learning and impacts instruction will be emphasized.

CI 598 <CIED 5398> Internship in Classroom Instruction.
This course is designed for the student who possesses a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university, has met all requirements for admission to the teacher education program, and is eligible for an internship as defined by the Texas Education Agency guidelines. Prerequisite: CI 593 <CIED 5393> or SED 383 and SED 464.

CI 599 <CIED 5399> Internship in Classroom Instruction.
This course is designed for the student who possesses a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university, has met all requirements for admission to the teacher education program, and is eligible for an internship as defined by the Texas Education Agency guidelines. Prerequisite: CI 593 <CIED 5393> or SED 383.

CIED 6394 Developing Curriculum for Adults.
This course provides knowledge and skills in curriculum development for adult learners. Candidates will analyze conceptual models of curriculum theory, curriculum development, and curriculum research. Topics in this course include: contextual factors affecting curricular design for adults, curriculum planning, implementation, and outcomes evaluation. Prerequisite: CIED 5397. Credit 3.

CI 731 <CIED 7331>Teaching Strategies for Developmental Mathematics.
This course explores research and practical application of mathematical concepts related to developmental mathematics education. Principals of learning, students' mathematical strategy development, assessment/evaluation of teaching/learning, and the use of instructional technology will be examined using research-based best practices in developmental mathematics education. Credit 3.


 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CJ 530 <CRIJ 5330> Critical Analysis of Justice Administration.
An analysis of the criminal justice system in the United States; role of justice agencies as part of societal response to crime; the knowledge base of criminal justice; issues, problems, trends.

CJ 531 Techniques for Crime Scene Investigation.
Course provides advanced study in the application of new techniques in crime scene investigation. The concept of physical evidence and quality assurance procedures in forensic analysis will be included.

CJ 532 <CRIJ 5332> Perspectives in Criminology.
Survey of the field of criminology emphasizing perspectives regarding the making of law, breaking of law and societal reactions to the breaking of law.

CJ 534 <CRIJ 5334> Courts As Organizations.
Critical evaluation of the dispensing of justice in America, using the systems theory approach, as well as current court policy.

CJ 535 <CRIJ 5335> Security and the Future.
Course will focus on meeting the changing demands of security in a global environment. Discussion emphasizing the understanding of how to design, implement, and integrate the security function in an every-changing world and the impact of major economic, demographic, and technological trends on developing strategies for security innovation and growth.

CJ 536 <CRIJ 5336> Legal Aspects and Private Security.
Focus will be on how the law impacts security in many diverse ways. Discussion will emphasize the concept of criminal intent; early criminal law and the emergence of law enforcement and private security; the legal difference between public policing and private security; and an overview of legal terms and issues with which the security manager must address.

CJ 537 Law and Forensic Sciences.
Focus will be on how the law impacts forensic science.

CJ 538 <CRIJ 5338> Security and Management.
Focus is on managing the security organization and its human resources; discussion and on results-oriented security management, the basic foundations of security, the importance of technology, and specialized security applications will be addressed.

CJ 539 <CRIJ 5339> Global Terrorism.
Course will focus on philosophies, tactics, and targets of terrorist groups; discussion of emerging terrorism trends and the roles of the private sector and U.S. Government in responding to and preventing terrorism. Students will also gain insight on how terrorism influences U.S. Foreign Policy.

CJ 560 Forensic Analysis of Pattern Evidence.
Course will introduce the concepts, theories and principles used in forensic analysis of material and pattern evidence. Recent developments in the techniques applied in forensic or material and pattern evidence will be discussed.

CJ 561 Principles of Quality Assurance in Forensic Science.
Course will introduce the concepts and procedures associated with quality assurance.

CJ 562 Seminar in Forensic Science.
Course will focus on the various subdisciplines in the forensic sciences. Recent developments and changes in these subdisciplines will be discussed.

CJ 563 <CRIJ 5363> The Juvenile Offender.
Theoretical perspectives regarding the creation of childhood as a social construct and the etiology of juvenile offending. Particular attention is paid to the role of family, peers and school.

CJ 572 <CRIJ 5372> Community Based Corrections.
Techniques and procedures utilized in the supervision of adult and juvenile probationers and parolees, and other residents of community-based corrections facilities. Preparation of social history, pre-hearing, and pre-sentence investigation reports. Emphasis on practical problems confronting the probation and parole and other community-based corrections officer.

CJ 592 <CRIJ 5392> Survey of Research Methods.
The theory and application of social science research techniques and designs, with a focus on the interpretation and use of research findings. Students who have not completed an introductory course in research methods within the past five years must take CJ 478 as a prerequisite.

CJ 593 <CRIJ 5393> Legal Aspects of the Criminal Justice System.
Aspects of law which are relevant to and essential for a better understanding of the criminal justice system and its related processes.

CJ 594 <CRIJ 5394> Legal Research.
Methods and techniques of research in the legal system. Designed to prepare students to locate, interpret and disseminate relevant statutory and case law as well as scholarly legal works.

CJ 615 Criminal Justice Statistics Lab.
One hour (one semester credit hour) computer lab which must be taken in conjunction with CJ 685 <CRIJ 6385> (Statistics for Criminal Justice Research).

CJ 632 <CRIJ 6332> Resource Development in the Organizational Context.
Critical issues and strategic questions regarding managing human resources in criminal justice agencies. Policy areas discussed are: (1) employee influence; (2) human resource flow; (3) reward systems; and (4) work systems. Human resource management as a coherent, proactive management model.

CJ 633 <CRIJ 6333> Seminar in Organization and Administration.
The study of bureaucracy and complex organizations with strong emphasis on the concepts and practices of the organization and management of public agencies in the United States. Special consideration is given to the various philosophies, typologies, and models of administrative systems in criminal justice.

CJ 634 <CRIJ 6334> Research Methods and Quantitative Analysis in Criminal Justice.
Methods and techniques of research and research design; conducting and assessing research in the criminal justice agency management environment; translation of research findings to policy; informational resources readily available to the agency manager. Designed to prepare students to gather decision-relevant information.

CJ 635 <CRIJ 6335> Seminar in Leadership and Management.
Problems and alternative solutions in criminal justice management. The case study method and current readings provide an admixture of practical and educational experiences intended to foster and disseminate new ideas for management strategies, especially as this is impacted by leadership styles, human resources, and the environment.

CJ 636 <CRIJ 6336> Computer/Technology Applications for Criminal Justice.
Techniques of data processing with emphasis upon utilization and application to criminal justice information management. Prerequisite: CJ 634 <CRIJ 6334>.

CJ 637 <CRIJ 6337> Directed Management and Development Projects.
This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to demonstrate under faculty supervision the ability to engage in a problem solving management project as a demonstration of skill in administration techniques.

CJ 639 <CRIJ 6339> Police in Society.
An examination of the evolution of police in modern society with a special emphasis given to the role of the police play in contemporary society. Current research examining the function of the police will be examined.

CJ 660 <CRIJ 6360> Seminar in Deviant Behavior.
Analysis of behavior which violates expectations that are shared and recognized as legitimate. Special attention is focused on societal reactions to such behavior.

CJ 661 <CRIJ 6361> Social Policy.
Evaluation of the legal, social, economic, philosophic, and controversial issues of governmental programs, administered by federal, state, local units of government, and the client systems served.

CJ 663 <CRIJ 6363> Leadership Psychology in Criminal Justice Management.
This course examines the important psychological processes that are involved in dealing with others. The manner in which an individual’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by others, especially in a criminal justice leadership environment, is the focal point.

CJ 665 <CRIJ 6365> Community Theory and the Administration of Justice.
This course examines the nature of criminal justice organizations as components of the political, social and economic inter-organizational networks that comprise communities. Topics such as the intersection of criminal justice, mental health, juvenile justice and educational systems are examined. The impact of criminal victimization and attributes of communities that foster crime are examined in detail. The processes that motivate and implement change in community based organizations are also addressed.

CJ 668 <CRIJ 6368> Seminar on Drugs, Society and Policy Issues.
This course will focus on issues and problems surrounding the problem of illicit drugs in society. Particular emphasis will be placed on policy related issues.

CJ 670 <CRIJ 6370> Internship in Criminal Justice.
A minimum of three months in an approved criminal justice setting. Designed to provide the graduate student with an opportunity to synthesize theory and practice. Prerequisite: consent of the Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs, College of Criminal Justice. Credit to be arranged.

CJ 672 <CRIJ 6372> Seminar in Criminology and Corrections.
Theory and problems in Criminology and Corrections. One or more term papers evidencing qualities of scholarship will be required.

CJ 675 Forensic Science Proseminar.
This course will be an introductory course and must be taken by all forensic science majors their first semester.

CJ 676 Seminar in Teaching.
This class prepares graduate criminal justice students for a career in academia. Course provides preparation in the classroom and participation in their own professional development. Mock student teaching exercises for critique are utilized

CJ 685 <CRIJ 6385> Statistics for Criminal Justice Research.
Review of descriptive and graphical techniques; probability and sampling theory; the normal curve and statistical inference; Central Limit Theo­rem; Chi-square, T and F distributions; analysis of variance and linear
regression.

CJ 687 <CRIJ 6387> The Ethics of Criminal Justice.
Ethics and moral philosophy in criminal justice including the role of natural law, constitutional law, code of ethics and philosophical principles. Strong emphasis will be put on examining the role of justice in a free society and the practical implications of justice to practitioners of police, courts and corrections.

CJ 688 <CRIJ 6388> Emergent Issues in Criminal Justice Leadership.
This serves as a capstone course for the Master of Science in Criminal Justice Leadership program, providing an opportunity for the integration of information offered in the program and its relationship to emergent issues. Addresses the effect of emergent perspectives in organization theory on public administration in general, and more specifically upon criminal justice management and leadership. Examines the impact of emergent technology upon criminal justice operations. Studies the integration of organization theory, principles of public administration, and community expectations of criminal justice leaders.

CJ 692 <CRIJ 6392> Program Evaluation for Criminal Justice Management.
Principles and techniques of program evaluation including models and case studies.

CJ 693 <CRIJ 6393> Special Readings in Criminal Justice.
Designed to give the graduate student academic flexibility. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: consent of the Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs of the College and of the instructor directing the readings.

CJ 694 <CRIJ 6394> Special Topics in Criminal Justice.
This course is needed to offer master’s level students the option of registering for a multi-topic course. The student can take the course under various special topics being offered.

CJ 696 <CRIJ 6396> Legal Aspects of Criminal Justice Management.
An overview of the legal issues commonly facing managers in criminal justice agencies. Particular emphasis is placed on public employment law including the hiring, promoting, disciplining and discharging of employees, fair employment practices, and agency and administrator civil liability. Both state and federal statutory and case law are examined.

CJ 698 <CRIJ 6398> Thesis Practicum.
Overview of research strategies; principles of research writing; and procedures for initiating, executing and completing a Thesis. Preparation and approval of a Prospectus. (Preliminary planning for the Thesis should begin during the first semester of graduate work; the student should enroll in CJ 698 <CRIJ 6398> after he/she has completed 12 semester hours of graduate work.)

CJ 699 <CRIJ 6099> Thesis.
The completion and defense of the Thesis. (The student must be registered in 699 the semester in which he/she receives his/her master’s degree.)

CJ 730 <CRIJ 7330> Seminar in Organization Theory.
An examination of organizational thought with application to criminal justice. Analysis of the developmental state of organizational theory, including historical derivations and the implications of various theoretical bases for organizational functioning.

CJ 733 <CRIJ 7333> Proseminar in Criminal Justice Issues.
The course is designed to give doctoral students a current, thorough, and comprehensive review of the criminal justice system — focusing on how the system functions in theory and practice, current future needs and trends. Students are required to submit extensive critiques and to participate in panel discussions.

CJ 734 <CRIJ 7334> Seminar in American Policing.
The course includes the philosophy and role of American policing, politics of policing, managing police organizations, police community relations, police operational and administrative practices, police research, police executive development, emergent issues and problems in policing.

CJ 736 <CRIJ 7336> Seminar in American Corrections.
In-depth examination of the various issues and problems in corrections as they relate to administration and management. A variety of problems is explored, including the philosophical justification for prisons, personnel management, sentencing and its implications, community-based corrections, rehabilitation, judicial intervention, and correctional reform.

CJ 737 <CRIJ 7337> Criminological Theory.
Overview of the major paradigms focusing on the causes of crime and deviant behavior with special attention given to the social, political and intellectual milieu within which each perspective arose. The course will include a discussion of criminological theories from a philosophy of science perspective focusing upon such issues as theory construction, theoretical integration and the formal evaluation of theory.

CJ 738 <CRIJ 7338> Seminar in American Courts.
Role and structure of prosecution, public defense, and the courts in the United States jurisprudence with emphasis upon criminal law, and problems in the administration of justice.

CJ 739 <CRIJ 7339> Distribution and Correlates of Crime.
Survey of research on the scope and nature of criminal activity and factors correlated with criminal behavior. Attention specifically on four general categories: race/ethnicity, gender, age and class. Examines the issues of etiology, victimology, differential police enforcement, sentencing and correctional practices.

CJ 742 <CRIJ 7434> Advanced Statistics I.
Introduction to multivariate statistical techniques including multiple regression, logistic regression, discriminate analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, canonical correlation, factor analysis, cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling. Four (4) credit hours. (Prerequisite: CJ 685 <CRIJ 6385> or equivalent in past years).

CJ 760 <CRIJ 7360> Advanced Seminar in Criminological Theory.
Extensive studies in areas of classical and/or current criminological theory. A basic knowledge of criminology is assumed. Emphasis is on analytical, critical evaluation, and the advancement of theory.

CJ 770 <CRIJ 7370> Specialized Readings.
Directed readings designed to give the student flexibility in developing an area of specialization. Prerequisites: Enrollment requires prior permission of the appropriate Dean and the supervising faculty which is given only when necessary to meet specific needs of the student and the College. A student can take only two CJ 770 <CRIJ 7370> courses.

CJ 771 <CRIJ 7371> Special Topics in Criminal Justice.
This course is needed to offer doctoral level students the option of registering for a multi-topic course. The student can take the course under various special topics being offered.

CJ 773 <CRIJ 7373> Research Practicum.
Supervised training including special applications in information acquisition, storage, retrieval, analysis, and display in criminal justice.

CJ 780 <CRIJ 7380> Seminar on the Legal Aspects of the Criminal Justice System.
This advanced seminar addresses the judicial process, legal liabilities and rights of public officers, prison law, and death penalty law, as relevant to understanding the criminal justice system and its related processes.  Credit 3.  Prerequisite:  CJ 775 <CRIJ 7375>.  

CJ 787 <CRIJ 7387> Research Design.
Advanced study of scientific inquiry with an emphasis on the practical aspects of research design and implementation. Topics include the philosophy of science; the relationship of sampling theory to statistical theory; studies in causation; non-experimental research; data systems and modern data processing techniques. Prerequisites: CJ 592 <CRIJ 5392> and consent of instructor.

CJ 789 <CRIJ 7389> Advanced Statistics II.
Survey of reliability analysis, loglinear, and logit loglinear analysis, nonlinear, weighted and two stage least-squares regression, probit analysis, survival analysis and Cox regression. (Prerequisite: CJ 742 <CRIJ 7434>).

CJ 793 <CRIJ 7393> Computer Based Data Analysis.
The course is intended to develop proficiency in data analysis using computerized statistical programs such as SPSS. Statistical theory and research design issues are combined with hands-on computer experience. The course emphasizes data management, multivariate statistics and diagnostics.

CJ 794 Focused Topics in Research.
Survey methods and techniques for achieving interpretable results in social research. Includes experimental, quasi-experimental and unobtrusive measures. Prerequisite: CJ 488 or equivalent.

CJ 896 <CRIJ 8396> Dissertation.

CJ 897 <CRIJ 8397> Dissertation.

CJ 898 <CRIJ 8398> Dissertation.

CJ 899 <CRIJ 8099> Dissertation.

 


 

COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CS 531 <COSC 5327> Operating Systems.
A comprehensive study of computer operating systems. Topics include: computer architecture, concurrent processes, multi-threaded systems, scheduling, memory management, I/O management, file systems, networking and the client/server model, distributed systems, and computer security. Prerequisites: CS 362 and 431. Credit 3.

CS 532 <COSC 5321> Parallel Computing.
This course is a study of large-scale parallel processing systems. The central themes are theoretical models, machine architecture, computer algorithms, and programming languages that model, support, describe and implement parallel processing. Prerequisite: CS 574 <COSC 5319>. Credit 3.

CS 533 <COSC 5322> Microcomputer Interfacing.
This course emphasizes real-time and fault-tolerant computing systems. Topics include interrupt processing, real-time programming and scheduling, fault-tolerant architectures and systems, and robotic programming. Extensive programming will be done. Prerequisite: CS 333. Credit 3.

CS 534 <COSC 5325> Operating System Security.
This course will provide the rationale and necessity for a full range of security concepts and techniques and how to apply them to multiple operating systems. The course will cover methodologies for the design of operating system security and forensic techniques for operating systems. Also covered will be the identification of best practices in the administration, testing and security for operating systems. Prerequisites: DF 531 <DFSC 5310> or CS 531 <COSC 5327>. Credit 3.

CS 536 <COSC 6319> Software Engineering.
This course emphasizes strategies, techniques, and methodologies that deal with the complexity in developing large-scale information systems. Methods for Software engineering methodologies, conventional as well as object-oriented, are discussed. Software measurement and management are discussed. Formal mechanisms for system specification, software development, and project management are introduced. Prerequisite: CS 437. Credit 3.

CS 537 <COSC 5335> Database Security.
Database security has an immense impact on the design of today’s electronic information systems. This course will provide an overview of database security concepts and techniques and discuss new directions of database security in the context of a connected commercial world. This course provides the information needed to develop, deploy and maintain a secure database solution. It exposes the pitfalls of database design, their means of identification and the methods of exploiting vulnerabilities. Prerequisites CS 334, DF 531 <DFSC 5310> or departmental approval. Credit 3.

CS 538 <COSC 5330> Computer Graphics.
A study of modern Computer Graphics programming techniques. Topics include: representations, transformations, and analysis of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional objects; techniques for hidden surface/edge removal, illumination and shading, volume rendering, animation, and image data compression; and practical experience in graphics software libraries and applications. Prerequisite: CS438. Credit 3.

CS 544 <COSC 6414> Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery.
 An introduction into Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery. Topics include discussion of variety of mining techniques. Mining of complex data such as multimedia database, text database, and world-wide-web will be introduced. The applications and trends in data mining will also be discussed. Prerequisite: CS566. Credit 3.

CS 560 <COSC 5340> Special Topics.
Topics and courses are selected to suit individual needs of students. The course may be repeated for additional credit. Prerequisite: Consent of graduate advisor. Credit 3.

CS 561 <COSC 6347> Programming Practicum.
The practicum provides the student an opportunity to develop their programming and analytical skills by applying concepts and techniques learned in organized classes to real world projects under the supervision of faculty and/or supervisory Computer professionals. Prerequisite: Eighteen hours of Computer and Information Science graduate level coursework. Student must register for this course every semester the practicum is in progress but only three hours of practicum will apply to the student’s degree plan. Credit 3.

CS 562 <COSC 5320> Computer Architecture and Organization.
An introduction into Computer Architecture and Organization. Topics include computer evolution and performance issues, the computer systems including system buses, internal and external memory, input/output, and operating system support, CPU issues including computer arithmetic, instruction sets, addressing modes, RISC and superscalar organization, control unit issues, microprogramming, and parallel organization. Prerequisites: CS 333 and CS 431. Credit 3.

CS 563 <COSC 5326> Networks and Data Communications.
An introduction to the basic techniques for interconnecting computers and peripherals for decentralized Computer. Network components, digital communications, interconnection architectures, communications protocols for geographic and local area networks and interprocess communications are covered. Prerequisite: CS 463. Credit 3.

CS 564 <COSC 6318> Programming Languages.
A comprehensive study of computer programming languages. Topics include: language design principles, formal grammars, procedural operating environment, language standardization, and language support for parallel and distributed programming. Language paradigms to be discussed will include procedural programming, logical programming, functional programming, and object-oriented programming. Prerequisite: CS 482. Credit 3.

CS 566 <COSC 5318> Database Systems.
A survey of contemporary topics in database systems. Topics include: relational database theory, database design issues, cryptography, security integrity issues, data recovery, concurrency problems, optimization, distributed database systems, the client/server model, object-oriented databases, stenography, data compression, data warehouse, data mining, logic/knowledge based systems, and other related topics. Prerequisite: CS 334. Credit 3.

CS 568 <COSC 5310> Cryptography and Steganography.
This course is designed to cover the theoretical and practical aspects of cryptography and steganography including specification, design, and programming. Topics include digital signatures, symmetric and asymmetric (public key) algorithms, hash functions, cryptographic algorithms, cost to break algorithms including key safety, Diffie-Hellmann, RSA, key stores, Secure Socket Layers, Virtual Private Networks (VPN), Certificate Authorities, and important cryptanalysis and stegananalysis strategies. Prerequisites DF 561 <DFSC 5319> or departmental approval. Credit 3.

CS 572 <COSC 5313> Artificial Intelligence.
A survey of topics in artificial intelligence. Topics include: history of AI, knowledge representation, knowledge acquisition, search techniques, control strategies, and AI languages. Applications include natural language processing, neural nets, and expert systems. Prerequisite: CS 362. Credit 3.

CS 573 <COSC 6313> Neural Networks.
An introduction into Neural Networks. Topics include discussion of variety of standard neural networks, with architecture, training algorithm, and applications; and development of neural network expert systems. Prerequisite: CS 362. Credit 3.

CS 574 <COSC 5319> Data Structures.
A number of important concepts and algorithms, with emphasis on correctness and efficiency, are reviewed. The advanced treatment of sorting, searching, hashing, and dynamic storage management is provided. Advanced data structures, such as advanced tree structures, graphs, and networks, are introduced. Applications to distributed file structures, database management systems, internet/intranetworks are covered. Prerequisite: CS 362. Credit 3.

CS 661 <DFSC 6311> Network Security II.
This course extends the practical skills and basic concepts provided in Network Security I to provide experience and skills in intrusion detection, management and prevention alongside the theoretical and conceptual basis for secure communication and perimeter defense in depth. The course explores the capabilities and limitations of ‘best practices’ approaches to network security together with significant case studies to provide the commercial and industrial context for the network security professional. Prerequisites: DF 561 <DFSC 5319>. Credit 3.

CS 694 <COSC 6321> Numerical Analysis.
Topics include solutions of equations, approximation and interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, the fast Fourier transform, and numerical simulation. Also listed as MTH 694. Prerequisite: MTH/CS 394. Credit 3.

CS 698 <COSC 6348> Thesis.
Credit 3.

CS 699 <COSC 6349> Thesis.
Credit 3.


 

COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CST 583 <CSTE 5336> Educational Multimedia.
This course explores the uses of multimedia in the classroom and extends the teachers skill base in the development of appropriate multimedia examples to support and enhance the middle school and high school curricula. Throughout the course students will gain experience in still and motion digital editing, audio and animation production. This course may not be counted toward the M.S. in Computer and Information Science, Information Assurance and Security or Digital Forensics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Credit 3.

CST 585 <CSTE 5319> Critical Analysis of Instructional Software.
This course examines the instructional and educational value of commercially available software for the pre-k through 12th grade. The course builds upon a foundation of instructional theory to identify appropriate characteristics of instructional software and explores the effectiveness of instructional software in the classroom. This course may not be counted toward the M.S. in Computer and Information Science, Information Assurance and Security or Digital Forensics. Prerequisites: CS 583. Credit 3.

CST 587 <CSTE 5337> Designing Instructional Materials for the Web.
This course examines the development of web sites for instructional purposes. The course looks at the systematic design of instruction, a process that examines the development of appropriate course goals, the identification of measurable objectives that meet those goals and intelligent approaches to assessing student performance. This design approach is then applied to the development of web-based materials, providing opportunities for skills acquisition in a variety of multimedia applications and their incorporation into a web site. The course culminates in the development of a geometry web site for use in schools. This course may not be counted toward the M.S. in Computer and Information Science, Information Assurance and Security or Digital Forensics. Prerequisites: CS 585. Credit 3.

CST 589 <CSTE 5338> Development of Technological Infrastructure.
This course examines the funding, design and implementation processes required to establish and realize a coherent technology acquisition and management strategy. This course may not be counted toward the M.S. in Computer and Information Science, Information Assurance and Security or Digital Forensics. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Credit 3.


 

CHEMISTRY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CHEM 5001 <CHM 503> Independent Study in Chemistry.
This course is intended to provide an avenue for selected graduate students to engage in independent studies. Registration is on an individual basis and is restricted to students in residence. Prerequisite: approval of department chair. Credit 1-3.

CHEM 5100 <CHM 510> Chemical Literature and Seminar.
Students will participate in the departmental seminar program. This participation will require the preparation and presentation of current research material in a format acceptable to the American Chemical Society. Credit 1.

CHEM 5361 <CHM 561> Physical Organic Chemistry.
This course consists of a study of the effect of structure upon reactivity of organic compounds. The qualitative and quantita tive relationship of structure to acidity and basicity in organic chemistry is developed. In addition, reactive intermediates (carbocations, carbanions and free radicals) are studied. Prerequisite: CHEM 2325/2125 <CHM 239/219>. Credit 3.

CHEM 5362 <CHM 562> Organic Reaction Mechanisms.
Current models for mechanisms of organic reactions are discussed and applied. The mechanisms and applications of synthetically important reactions are also surveyed. Literature searching for less often utilized but historically important transformations are integral to the course. The methods of determining reaction mechanisms are surveyed along with applications to individual reactions. Prerequisite: CHEM 2325/2125 <CHM 239/219>. Credit 3.

CHEM 5368 <CHM 568> Analytical Spectroscopy.
Theory and application of selected areas of spectroscopy commonly used in qualitative and quantitative analysis are covered. Topics include atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, laser analytical methods, fluorescence, phosphorescence, and chemiluminescence and their application to environmental, atmospheric, and bioanalytical problems. Prerequisite: CHEM 4440 <CHM 440>. Credit 3.

CHEM 5372 <CHM 572> Advanced Biochemistry I.
The chemical structure and the biological functions and controls of proteins are reviewed. Proteins to be considered include enzymes, transport proteins and structural proteins. Protein biosynthesis and recombinant DNA technology are also discussed. Credit 3.

CHEM 5374 <CHM 574> Chemistry of Coordination Compounds.
The chemistry of compounds containing metal ions is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the complex transition of metal compounds. The electronic configurations of these ions in various bonding environments are considered in interpreting their chemical and physical properties. Prerequisites: CHEM 4367 <CHM 467> and CHEM 4448 <CHM 448>. Credit 3.

CHEM 5381 <CHM 581> Advanced Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics.
Principles are stressed including the three laws of thermodynamics, thermochemistry and statistical thermodynamics. Applications of the principles to gases, solution, mixtures, solids and interfaces are given. Prerequisites: CHEM 4448 <CHM 448>. Credit 3.

CHEM 5385 <CHM 585> Selected Topics in Advanced Chemistry.
This course is adaptable to the needs and interests of the individual graduate student majoring in Chemistry. Modern developments in specific subdivisions of the field of chemistry are considered. It may be repeated for credit, provided the repetition is not in the same subdivisional field. The subdivisional fields offered are: analytical, biochemistry, environmental, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Chemistry. Credit 3.

CHEM 6398 <CHM 698> Graduate Research in Chemistry.
Credit 3.

CHEM 6099 <CHM 699> Thesis.
Credit 3.

 


 

COUNSELING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CNE 510 <COUN 5110> Workshop in Counseling.
This course deals with current topics in the field of counseling. The topics selected for the workshop will be based on needs identified through collaborative endeavors with schools, service centers, professional organizations and governmental agencies.

CNE 511 <COUN 5111> Counseling Program Orientation.
The context of this course includes the history of counseling, a review of the standards for licensure and certification, and a discussion of current issues and concerns in the field of counseling.

CNE 512 <COUN 5112> Ethics for Counselors.
This course examines the professional codes of ethics and their limitations, the value clashes in counseling, ethical decision making models and the major ethical issues in the counseling field.

CNE 513 <COUN 5113> Assessment in Marriage and Family Therapy.
This course is designed to introduce students to assessment instruments and techniques in the field of marriage and family therapy. Students will be introduced to current assessment instruments and inventories intended to measure marriage and family function, resilience, adjustment, and adaptation for use in practice and research.

CNE 533 <COUN 5333> Introduction to Counseling and Guidance.
This course introduces students to the field of school counseling. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of counseling professional identity, and professional ethics. The services provided in a comprehensive program of guidance and counseling are discussed.

CNE 534 <COUN 5334> Effective Human Behavior.
A study is made of the dynamics of human behavior with emphasis on understanding dysfunction as well as the basic nature of human beings who successfully cope with the problems that confront them in everyday life. Attention is given to development of emotional health in personal and social contexts such as home, school, work, and marriage. Prerequisite: CNE 597.

CNE 564 <COUN 5364> Theories of Counseling.
A comprehensive study is made of the major theories of counseling. Attention is given to systematic ways of viewing the counseling process. Divergences and convergences among theories are examined for practical application. Prerequisites: Admission to program and CNE 511 <COUN 5111> orientation taken concurrently.

CNE 570 <COUN 5370> Career Counseling Across the Lifespan.
This course is designed to assist the counselor in developing and initiating a comprehensive career education program. A study is made of the world of work as well as the dynamics and developmental aspects of vocational choice. Emphasis is also placed on the use of occupational information, test scores, personal data, grades, and other pertinent information in working with students individually and in groups. Prerequisites: CNE 597.

CNE 579 <COUN 5379> Methods of Research.
Study is made of types and methods of educational research, the collecting, analyzing and sharing of data with the pubic. The student is expected to complete a research project or field study utilizing appropriate methods of educational research. Prerequisite: CNE 663.

CNE 585 <COUN 5385> Pre-Practicum Techniques of Counseling.
This course is designed to provide experiences in the exploration and application of individual counseling techniques. Role-playing, self-exploration, and structuring of the counseling relationship are emphasized. Prerequisites: CNE 564 <COUN 5364> or concurrent enrollment.

CNE 587 <COUN 5387> Workshop in Counseling.
This course is designed to serve the needs of in-service counselors in schools and those in private practice. Topics will vary as needs demand. May be repeated as scheduled topics vary.

CNE 591 <COUN 5391> Child and Adolescent Counseling.
This course is designed to help students develop approaches for putting counseling theories into practice in helping children and adolescents who are experiencing difficulties in their developmental, personal and social growth. Prerequisites: CNE 534 <COUN 5334> .

CNE 592 <COUN 5392> Cross Cultural Issues in Counseling.
This course will examine the sociocultural characteristics and counseling issues related to the varied cultures in today’s society. Hispanic, African-American, Native American, and Asian American cultures will be examined along with issues related to gender and Gay/Lesbian concerns.

CNE 593 <COUN 5393> Community Counseling.
This course provides theoretical and applied information regarding community counseling services. A variety of delivery systems, staffing procedures, emergency services, and treatment paradigms are presented. Prerequisite: CNE 534, CNE 564.

CNE 597 <COUN 5397> Human Growth and Development Across the Lifespan.
A review of theory and research concerning the growth and development of the individual through the lifespan with emphasis placed on childhood and adolescence. The course attempts to relate theory and research to present concerns and problems of teachers through the study of physiological, psychological and social interrelationships. Experience in the procedures of child study are provided.

CNE 599 <COUN 5399> Play Therapy Basics.
This course is designed to enhance/increase the counselor’s understanding of the child’s world as perceived by the child, the relationship between the child’s world and behavior. The major theories of play therapy, and the utilization of play media to facilitate the child’s self-exploration, self-expression, self-understanding, and personal growth will be explored. Prerequisite: CNE 564 <COUN 5364> and CNE 597.

CNE 631 <COUN 6331> Advanced Play Therapy.
This course is designed to provide play therapists with extensive practical research experience in regard to issues relative to the play therapy relationship. Case analysis, theoretical application, and current research issues and trends will be investigated. Prerequisite: CNE 599.

CNE 632 <COUN 6332> Theories of Marriage and Family Therapy.
This course focuses on basic concepts in marriage and family therapy, theories of therapeutic change in families, marriage and family development and foundations of family systems therapy. Prerequisite: CNE 564.

CNE 633 <COUN 6333> Techniques of Marriage and Family Therapy.
Application of the main approaches in family therapy to clinical work. This includes skill development in working with couples and families in a variety of contexts. Prerequisite: CNE 632.

CNE 634 <COUN 6334> Professional and Ethical Issues in Counseling.
This course studies the current ethical issues and the professional roles of marriage and family therapists, mental health counselors and school counselors. This includes study of the Texas Family Code, the licensing acts for Marriage and Family Therapists and Professional Counselors, and regulations for school counselors. Prerequisite: CNE 585.

CNE 635 <COUN 6335> Methods of Consultation, Coordination and Counseling.
A comprehensive study is made of contemporary practices of consultation and coordination in the school counseling profession. The course includes study of community service agencies, referral sources, legal and ethical practices and the acquisition of practical school counseling skills. Prerequisites: CNE 533.

CNE 637 <COUN 6337> Counseling for Sexual Concerns.
Students will develop an understanding of sexual anatomy, the physiology of sexual function, and therapeutic applicants for assessing, counseling, and referral procedures for clients who present with sexual concerns. Students will investigate various therapeutic approaches when dealing with sexual concerns. Students will explore how life experiences, sexual values, and beliefs about sexual behavior affect the therapeutic interaction and outcome. Prerequisites: CNE 534, CNE 632, and CNE 674.

CNE 660 <HIED 6360> Student Services in Higher Education.
This course provides in-depth content regarding the practice of student services/student affairs in Higher Education. Theoretical foundations, competencies needed for successful student personnel work, and current issues and problems in student services will be addressed. The course provides a structural framework for the student services organization as it complements academics in institutions of higher education.

CNE 663 <COUN 6363> Assessment in Guidance and Counseling.
Study will include the principles of assessment and evaluation in counseling, assessment instruments used in counseling services, elementary statistical concepts, methods of evaluating assessment instruments, the process of synthesizing and interpreting assessment data, and the ethics of assessment. Prerequisites: CNE 564 <COUN 5364> or taken concurrently.

CNE 664 <COUN 6364> Counseling for Additions.
This course covers the theory, research, and practice of substance abuse prevention and chemical dependency counseling with special application to the functions of counselors. Prerequisite: CNE 564 <COUN 5364> or equivalent course.

CNE 674 <COUN 6374> Practicum in Group Counseling.
Participation in small group activities is a significant part of this course which has been designed to meet the needs of counselors in a variety of settings. The didactic portion of the course will focus on the knowledge, practice, skills, and person of the effective group counselor. Prerequisites: CNE 564 <COUN 5364> and CNE 585.

CNE 676 <COUN 6376> Supervised Practice in Counseling.
This laboratory course is designed to prepare the student in the practical application and integration of the principles and methods of counseling. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy and CNE 674.

CNE 686 <COUN 6386> Field Practicum.
The course provides supervised experiences in a counseling setting. Study is made of the duties and responsibilities of the counselor at work. Prerequisites: CNE 676 <COUN 6376> and subject to individual placement.

CNE 698 <COUN 6398> Thesis I.
This first phase of the Thesis includes a review of the literature, research design, collection of pilot data, and related steps. Students are required to present and defend a research proposal. Prerequisite: Admission as a Degree Candidate.

CNE 699 <COUN 6399> Thesis II.
The second phase of the Thesis includes data collection, manuscript preparation and defense of the Thesis. Prerequisite: CNE 698.


 

COUNSELING DOCTORAL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CNE 710 <COUN 7110> Doctoral Seminar.
This course is designed to provide an orientation to doctoral studies in counseling, topics of current interest to doctoral students, and the faculty and information regarding areas of study and research related to the doctoral program. This course may be repeated five times, for a maximum of six credits. Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral program in Counseling. Credit 1.

CNE 731 <COUN 7331> Advanced Counseling Theories.
In depth study of major counseling theories, with special emphasis on comparative analysis. Prerequisite: Admission into counseling doctoral program. Credit 3.

CNE 732 <COUN 7332> Advanced Appraisal Techniques.
This is an advanced course in assessment procedures used by counselor educators and directors of counseling and guidance in the schools. A case study approach will be utilized to guide students through the application of assessment, diagnosis and treatment planning for childhood, adolescent, and adult mental disorders and behavior problems. Credit 3.

CNE 734 <COUN 7334> Theories of Counselor Supervision.
This course is designed to introduce students to models of counselor supervision. The course is conducted in a seminar-discussion format and, as part of the course students will provide one or more counselor trainees with supervision. Prerequisite: CNE 731. Credit 3.

CNE 735 <COUN 7335> Practice of Counselor Supervision.
Supervised experience in supervision of counseling. Students meet for individual supervision of supervision and in a seminar group to assess their effectiveness in their supervisory relationships, to obtain feedback on tapes and observation, and to integrate these learnings into their supervisory process. Prerequisite: CNE 734. Credit 3.

CNE 736 <COUN 7336> College Teaching in Counseling.
Application of planning, instructional, and evaluation skills. Doctoral students lead skill training groups, lecture to a masters level class, and guide group discussion with faculty supervision. Prerequisite: CNE 731. Credit 3.

CNE 737 <COUN 7337> Advanced Counseling Practicum and Techniques.
Supervised experience in counseling. Students meet for individual supervision and in a seminar group to assess their effectiveness in their helping relationships, to obtain feedback on tapes and observation, and to integrate these learnings into their counseling behavior. Prerequisite: CNE 636 field Practicum or equivalent, CNE 731 <COUN 7331> and CNE 732. Controlled registration. Special fee: $30 per semester. Credit 3.

CNE 738 <COUN 7338> Human Dynamics and Consultation Skills.
Developing effective human relations and communications skills are crucial to prepare for interactions with parents, students, staff, and school boards. Conferencing skills, active, emphatic listening skills, and knowledge of personality and family dynamics will be developed. Students will learn to network with the community and systems in broader contexts. Doctoral students only.

CNE 739 <COUN 7339> Doctoral Internship in Counseling.
Professional service in field setting appropriate for counseling, consultation, and personnel work, under supervision. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit-hours. Credit/No Credit grading. Prerequisites: CNE 737 <COUN 7337> and permission of doctoral director. Credit 3.

CNE 762 <COUN 7362> Methods of Counseling Research.
Study of both quantitative and qualitative research with emphasis upon an understanding of statistical concepts and procedures necessary to create and implement effective educational research. Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral program in counseling. Credit 3.

CNE 763 <COUN 7363> Application of Counseling Research.
Fundamental concepts and tools of research applied to educational problems. Each student will prepare a proposal for the dissertation. Prerequisites: CNE 762, CNE 772, and STA 765 <STAT 7365> or equivalents. Credit 3.

CNE 772 <COUN 7372> Qualitative Methodology.
This course is designed to teach qualitative research methodology within a counseling problems-based contextual framework. The course will emphasize qualitative techniques through lecture, discussion, readings, and field-based research projects using the methods learned. Prerequisite: CNE 762. Credit 3.

CNE 773 <COUN 7373> Statistical Methods for Counselor Education Research.
This course is designed to teach students how to manage, analyze, and interpret data related to counselor education themes at the doctoral level. The course will address quantitative methods (e.g., descriptive statistics, t-test, one-way and factorial ANOVA) via lectures, exams, small and large group discussions, and computer work both in and outside of class. Credit 3.

CNE 774 <COUN 7374> Multivariate Methods for Counselor Education Research.
This course is designed to teach students how to manage, analyze, and interpret multivariate data related to counselor education themes at the doctoral level. The course will emphasize multivariate methods via lectures, exams, small and large group discussions, and computer work both in and outside of class. Credit 3.

CNE 787 <COUN 7387> Workshop in Counselor Education.
This course will provide the doctoral student an opportunity to engage in detailed and in-depth study of a program or problem in counselor supervision. The student will work under the supervision of a doctoral faculty member and will be expected to produce a written product or presentation. Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral program in counseling and approval of doctoral director. Credit 3.

CNE 833 <COUN 8333> Dissertation.
The completion of an approved dissertation which will contribute to counseling. Field-based projects will be emphasized. Must be repeated for a minimum of 9 semester hours. Prerequisites: Admission to the doctoral program in counseling, completion of counseling Core, Research component and Research Tools courses, successful completion of comprehensive exam and approval of doctoral advisor. Credit 3.


 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COM 531 <COMS 5331> Speech Communication Methods and Research.
An introduction to graduate level research methods, including quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection, analysis, and interpretation. Students will learn to develop individual research proposals.

COM 532 <COMS 5332> Statistical Methods for Communication.
This course focuses upon various statistical techniques used in communication research, including univariate and bivariate techniques, hypothesis testing for single and multiple samples, as well as methods used to investigate relationships between two or more variables such as ANOVA, ANCOVA, and multiple regression analysis. Lectures, assigned readings and projects are used to describe and illustrate advanced literature on the logic, interpretation, and assumptions of each statistical model. Emphasis is placed upon understanding of the techniques and their assumptions as well as applications. Research activities based on the use of statistical techniques are included in the course.

COM 560 <COMS 5360> Advanced Interpersonal Communication.
A study of methodological and theoretical issues in relational communication with special attention to building ongoing research projects in support of theory.

COM 570 <COMS 5370> Health Communication and the Family.
A study of a variety of health communication topics that relate to and influence the family and other relationships. Perspective and theories in public health, adolescent alcohol and drug abuse, parentchild-physician communication, telemedicine, and rural health concerns.

COM 571 <COMS 5371> Sex & Gender in Communication.
A study of sex and gender differences and similarities in communication behavior. Students will examine the sex and gender scholarship and assess Its Implications for understanding communication in interpersonal and family relationships.

COM 580 <COMS 5380> Advanced Family Communication.
Methodological and theoretical issues in family communication.

COM 590 <COMS 5390> Seminar in Interpersonal Communication.
Advanced topics in interpersonal communication theory and research. Topics rotate from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change.

COM 591 <COMS 5391> Seminar in Family Communication.
Advanced topics in family com munication theory and research. Topics rotate from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change.

COM 698 <COMS 6398> Thesis I: Practicum.
Initial phase of the thesis investigation, including review of the literature, establishment of the research design, collection of pilot data, and plan for completion. Prerequisite: Permission of thesis director.

COM 699 <COMS 6399> Thesis II: Completion.
Final phase of the thesis investigation, including data collection and analysis, writing, and defense. The student must be registered in COM 699 during the semester in which the thesis is completed and defended. Prerequisite: COM 698.

 


 

DIGITAL FORENSICS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

DF 531 <DFSC 5310> Principle and Policy In Information Assurance.
An investigation into the development of security planning and policy formation, risk management, security education, training and awareness programs. This course examines physical and electronic approaches to data protection and derives appropriate assessment strategies for determining the assurance quality of target systems. Credit 3.

DF 534 <DFSC 5317> Digital Security.
This course introduces the student to basic security needs. The course will include, but not be limited to examination of individual vs. government privacy issues, federal encryption standards, the different layers of security currently available, cryptography, and strategies for evaluation and selection of security methods. Credit 3.

DF 535 Malware.
This course will study the motivations of malicious code (such as computer viruses, Trojan horses, spyware and adware) developers and the common weaknesses exploited by such code. Forensic techniques for protection and recovery from such malicious code will be examined in detail. Prerequisites CS 534 <COSC 5325>. Credit 3.

DF 560 <DFSC 5340> Special Topics.
Topics and courses are selected to suit individual needs of students. The course may be repeated for additional credit. Prerequisite: Consent of graduate advisor. Credit 3.

DF 561 <DFSC 5319> Network Security I.
The rationale and necessity for securing computer systems and data networks, as well as methodologies for the design of security system, establishing security protocols and the identification of best practices in the administration, testing and response protocols for secure communications systems. Credit 3.

DF 564 <DFSC 5325> Organizational System Security.
This course provides advanced study of system security concepts as applied to the protection of organizational systems including 1) principles of security modeling, accountability and access control, 2) the ISO model for network infrastructure design and protection, 3) communication security and control management, 4) auditing and monitoring, 5) incident management, and 5)  law, investigations and ethics. Credit 3.

DF 566 <DFSC 5335> Risk Assessment and Financial System Security.
This course will provide the rationale and necessity for a full range of security concepts and techniques to manage and mitigate information, and particularly financial information, security risks.  Information technology auditing techniques, issues, and current topics, including risk assessment, creating threat profiles, developing protection strategies and internal control management will be examined.  Best practices in risk management will be explored through current readings. Credit 3.

DF 583 <DFSC 5327> Digital Forensics Investigation.
This course explores tools for the recovery of information on hardware or hidden within other formats. Topics also include cryptographic analysis, password recovery, the bypassing of specific target operating systems, and obtaining data from a digital device that has been destroyed. Credit 3.

DF 584 <DFSC 5328> Software Forensic Evidence Management.
Analysis of investigative techniques and tools in the detection, investigation and analysis of digital crimes. This course examines the nature of cyberevidence and the tracking and identification of cybercriminals. Credit 3.

DF 587 File Systems Forensics.
This course is an advanced treatment of computer file system analysis in the field of Digital Forensics. Topics covered include foundations of computer disk technology, storage volume analysis and storage file system analysis.  Detailed analysis of DOS and Apple partitions, server based partitions including Sun slices, and multiple disk volume analysis such as RAID and disk spanning will be covered.  Detailed analysis FAT, NTFS and EXT3 file systems will also be covered.  An emphasis will be placed on manual analysis with minimal supporting tools and utilities in order to give the student a mastery of the various file systems from a low-level perspective.  Credit 3.

DF 589 <DFSC 6335> Disaster Recovery.
This course will focus on the discipline of Information Security and its associated areas of Contingency operations. It will provide the student with skills and knowledge concerning managerial issues associated with planning for and reacting to events, incidents, disasters, and crises. Prerequisites: DF 531 <DFSC 5310>. Credit 3.

DF 630 <DFSC 5318> Cyber Law.
Focus will be on how the law impacts digital security in diverse ways. Discussion will emphasize the concept of criminal intent, the digital victim and address jurisdictional issues and provide an overview of legal terms and issues with which the security manager must address. Prerequisites: CJ 593 <CRIJ 5393>, DF 583 <DFSC 5327>. Credit 3.

DF 637 <DFSC 6347> Directed Management and Development Project.
This course will provide the rationale and necessity for a full range of security concepts and techniques and how to apply them to multiple operating systems. The course will cover methodologies for the design of operating system security and forensic techniques for operating systems. Also covered will be the identification of best practices in the administration, testing and security for operating systems. Prerequisites 24 hours graduate coursework. Continuous enrollment in DF 637 <DFSC 6347> is required until graduation. Credit 3.

DF 661 <DFSC 6310> Cyber Warfare and Terrorism.
This course will focus on philosophies, tactics, and targets of cyber terrorist organizations. The course includes discussion of emerging cyber war trends and the roles of the private sector and U.S. Government in responding to, mitigating and preventing electronic offensive actions. Prerequisite: DF 561 <DFSC 5319>. Credit 3.

DF 670 Internship.
A minimum of three months in an approved digital forensics or information assurance and security environment.  Designed to provide the graduate student with an opportunity to synthesize theory and practice.   Prerequisite:  consent of the Graduate Advisor, Department of Computer Science


 

DANCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

DANC 5332 <DNC 533> The Development of Advanced Skills in Dance.
This course includes theoretical concepts and laboratory experiences in modern dance and ballet technique. Course may be repeated for credit with approval of the Chair of the Dance Department. Prerequisite:  Graduate Standing or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

DANC 5360 <DNC 560> Seminar in Dance Production.
This course provides experience and information regarding all aspects the presentation of a of a dance performance.  Fundamental design skills such as costume, lighting and sound design as well as practical skills such as light board operation, sound recording and board operation, development and distribution of publicity materials, fund raising, box office operations, house management and video operation, are experienced in actual production settings. Prerequisite:  graduate standing or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

DANC 5371 <DNC 571> Theory of Dance.
An examination is made of the philosophical context within which of dance as an art form functions.  Two vastly contrasting aesthetic theories are presented and explored as a means to developing in the student a well-considered and grounded personal aesthetic. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

DANC 5373 <DNC 573> Advanced Laban Movement Analysis.
This course provides an overview of Laban Movement Analysis at the graduate level. It emphasizes the areas of Body, Effort, Shape, and Space as means of describing and understanding non-verbal communication. Focus is on the psychophysical connections that facilitate efficiency and expressivity in movement. Course concepts are introduced through observation, improvisation, exploration, composition, readings, group discussions, and movement assignments.  The methodologies of observation and description are explored as means of identifying and analyzing the meaningful and qualitative aspects of human movement. A brief history/application of LMA is included in the curriculum. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

DANC 5374 <DNC 574> Advanced Laban Movement Analysis II.
This course builds on the exploration of the Laban system categories of Body, Effort, Shape and Space, established in DANC 5373 <DNC 573>.  Focus is on refining the student's understanding of these descriptive terms and their interrelationship.  In addition, deeper concepts, such as the coalescence of these factors as they are observed in the physical relationships between people, are addressed.  Throughout, the course emphasizes the context and implications of movement as a meaningful mode of human communication  . Prerequisite: DANC 5373 <573>. Credit 3.

DANC 5376 <DNC 576> Contemporary Dance Composition I. This course includes the analysis of various components of design and development of basic dance studies into more extended dance works. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.  Credit 3.

DANC 5377 <DNC 577> Independent Studies.
This course is adaptable to the needs and interests of the individual student. Students with specific interests are provided the opportunity to investigate and make application in theoretical, creative or field experience approaches to their area of concentration. May be repeated provided the repetition is in a different area of study. Prerequisites: Permission of the Chair of the Dance Department. Credit 3.

DANC 5378 <DNC 578> Dance Composition II.
The purpose of this course is to extend understanding of dance as an art and a craft, and to improve ability to choreograph an extended dance work. Prerequisite: DANC 5376 <DNC 576> or permission of instructor. Credit 3.

DANC 5380 <DNC 580> Dance Composition III.
This graduate level choreography course builds upon earlier classes and examines various approaches to the creative process. Emphasis will be placed on preparing students for the graduate thesis concert.  Exercises and assignments will test the student's ability to adapt to a variety of situations and hone problem-solving skills. Prerequisites: DANC 5376 <DNC 576>, DANC 5378 <DNC 578> or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

DANC 5385 <DNC 585> Research Methods in Dance.
Research methods specific to dance theory, choreography, and performance are introduced. Standard and electronic information resources, methods of investigation, and various means of organizing a review of literature are examined. Written and organizational skills are evaluated. Competencies and deficiencies in oral presentations are reviewed, recorded, and assessed. The course culminates with the development, refinement, and oral presentation of a written thesis proposal in dance. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

DANC 5388 <DNC 588> Dance and Integrated Technologies.
This course introduces methods of integrating media technologies into the dancer’s experience in the areas of dance graphics, sound design for dance, and dance video. Graduate students learn camera, computer and software skills that will facilitate their ability to expand creative expression, as well as enhance their ability to package and promote themselves as artists in a variety of media. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

DANC 5389 <DNC 589>Professional Issues in Dance.
This course is designed for the graduate level student who is preparing to enter the dance profession. Major emphasis will be placed on identifying professional issues in the field of dance and preparing the student for career advancement.  By the end of this course, each student will create and package a portfolio in the areas of performance, choreography and academia.  Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of the instructor. Credit 3

DANC 6398 <DNC 698> Thesis.
This phase of the thesis development involves the selection and design of a suitable performance and/or creative project with the completion of the review of related literature and research work necessary. The thesis committee must approve a pilot showing of the work-in-progress. Prerequisite: Completion of the Graduate Core for the Master of Fine Arts in Dance. Credit 3.

DANC 6399 <DNC  699> Thesis.
The exhibition of the thesis will consist of a formal thesis concert of the student’s performance and/or creative work accompanied by a supporting paper. The written paper must comply with the specifications of the written thesis, which are available in the Office of the Dean of the College of Fine Arts and Mass Communication. The student must also pass an oral examination, testing general knowledge of dance concepts and traditions that relate to his/her thesis work. (The student must be registered in DANC 6399 <DNC  699> the semester in which he/she completes requirements for the Master of Fine Arts degree.) Prerequisite: DANC 6398 <DNC 698>.   Credit 3.


 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ECE 538 <ECHE 5363> Building Relationships with Diverse Families and Children.
This course is an in-depth study of the relationship between families and schools in diverse communities. Topics addressed include discussions of major theories that support partnerships with parents; models for parent, school, and community partnerships; home, school, and community influences on children’s lives; parenting styles; family dynamics; parent education strategies; communicating with parents; and the rights and responsibilities of parents, children, and teachers. Experiences with young children and their families will be required.

ECE 539 <ECHE 5349> Language and Literacy Development in the Young Child.
A study is made of the current theories, research, and myths surrounding the development of language in the young child. Students will examine language programs and prepare appropriate language materials for preschool/primary children.

ECE 566 <ECHE 5375> Growth and Development of the Young Child.
An examination of theory and current research concerning the growth and development of the individual through the eighth year of life is made. The course relates theory and research to present concerns of individuals in the helping profession through the study of intellectual, psychological, and social interrelationships. Experiences in the procedures of child study is provided.

ECE 580 <ECHE 5373> Theoretical Perspectives in Early Childhood Education.
Study is made of the historical and philosophical roots of early childhood education from the middle ages to contemporary practice. An in-depth study of theorists, programs, and methods will be an integral part of the course.

ECE 581 <ECHE 5343> Curriculum Development in Early Childhood Education.
Study is made of the scope and sequence of learning experiences for young children. Current research on early childhood curriculum development and model programs is examined. The professional standards and Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for Pre-kindergarten and Kindergarten are presented.

ECE 582 <ECHE 5355> Current Practices in Early Childhood Settings.
The course includes planning and developing research-based materials and thematic units for use with young children. An in-depth study of the project approach is presented.

ECE 587 <ECHE 5388> Workshop in Education: Early Childhood Education.


 

ECONOMICS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ECO 530 <ECON 5300> Economics Principles and Policy.
An intensive study of microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts; the price system and how it functions under various market structures including perfect competition, pure monopoly, and imperfect market structures including monopolistic competition and oligopoly; resource markets; national income measurement and determination; inflation and unemployment; money and banking; economic stabilization including monetary and fiscal policy; international policy. This course does not apply to the 36-hour graduate credit hour requirement of the MBA degree program or the Master of Science in Finance degree.

ECO 560 <ECON 5360> Economic Analysis of Strategy.
A study of game theoretical tools and their application of important real-world economic phenomena. Topics include: the organization of industry, labor and work-place economics, international trade policies, government and voting strategies, the role of legal institutions in the economy, and bargaining and bidding strategies.

ECO 570 <ECON 5370> Economic Theory.
An integration of micro and macro economic theory with special emphasis on how various economic policy choices may impact the operation of business firms and the national economy. The course requires students to find micro and macroeconomic issues of current interest, gather related quantitative data, and review recent research that apply/test the theories covered in this course.

ECO 571 <ECON 5357> Seminar in Managerial Economics.
Application of the techniques of optimization theory to problems in business and economics, with special emphasis on decision-making under conditions of risk and uncertainty. Participants apply recent developments in economic analysis to current business problems such as demand and cost estimation, modeling, and forecasting.

ECO 575 <ECON 5380> Directed Readings and Research in Economics.
A directed individual study is made of a selected problem in the field of economics. Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair and Graduate Coordinator.

ECO 579 <ECON 5351> Seminar in Labor Economics.
Labor economics focuses on short-run and long-run aspects of supply and demand of labor, including theory and empirical analysis of the behavior of participants in the labor force. Readings in current labor economics literature and appropriate research topics will be covered, including the history of labor organizations. Frequent topics include the microeconomic effects of marriage, fertility, and mobility on labor supply, as well as the macroeconomic effects of unemployment on inflation.


 

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

EDL 710 <EDLD 7110> Doctoral Studies in Educational Leadership.
This course is designed to provide an orientation to doctoral studies in educational leadership, topics of current interest to doctoral students, and information regarding areas of study and research related to the doctoral program. Students in the Ed.D. program in educational leadership are required to take the course each semester of residence. May be repeated for a total of three credits. Prerequisites: Admission to Ed.D. Program in Educational Leadership. Credit 1.

EDL 731 <EDLD 7331> Leadership Theory and Applications.
Examination of many leadership theories, models, and processes with emphasis on the results of the applications of various theories, models, and processes to educational leadership. This course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing student engagement In research. Prerequisites: Admission to Ed.D. Program in Educational Leadership. Credit 3.

EDL 732 <EDLD 7332> Instructional Theory and Applications.
Systematic study is made of existing research on key factors influencing instructional effectiveness and on models for school restructuring. The relationship of instruction and school effectiveness is explored in depth. This course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing student engagement In research. Prerequisites: Admission to Ed.D. Program in Educational Leadership. Credit 3.

EDL 733 <EDLD 7333> Societal Factors Affecting Education.
Through this course, graduate students will have the opportunity to examine the political, economic, and cultural factors affecting public school education and instructional leadership today. This course is designed to provide instructional leaders with insight and background into the life styles, values and aspirations of various cultural groups as related to the leadership process. Prerequisites: Admission to the Ed.D. Program in Educational Leadership. Credit 3.

EDL 734 <EDLD 7334> Issues in Contemporary Education.
Analysis of the research literature and field-based data relative to current issues facing instructional leaders in contemporary schools will be completed. Assessment of enrollment trends, curriculum changes, personal problems, and financial patterns are issues that will be addressed. This course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing student engagement In research. Prerequisites: Admission to the Ed.D. Program in Educational Leadership. Credit 3.

EDL 735 <EDLD 7335> Conflict Management for Contemporary Education.
Examination of conflict management processes and skills with emphasis on interaction patterns, interpersonal relationships, and communication skills. Prerequisites: Admission to the Ed.D. Program in Educational Leadership. Credit 3.

EDL 736 <EDLD 7336> Educational Leadership Internship.
Students participate and are evaluated in an intensive study and field experience relating to positions in educational leadership. Designed to provide insight into problems in the leadership process in an operational setting distinct from prior or concurrent work experience. Prerequisites: Completion of 12 hours of leadership area core. Credit 3.

EDL 737 <EDLD 7337> Academic Writing and Research.
In this course, students will develop the skills and strategies for academic literacy, including critical reading and clear writing. Students will utilize scientific writing styles and will complete a written review of research literature.

EDL 738 <EDLD 7338> Organizational Behavior and Theory.
This study of organizational theory and behavior is an integration and application of behavioral science knowledge and is built upon contributions from a number of behavioral disciplines. The prominent areas are psychology, sociology, social psychology, anthropology, and political science. Contributions of the psychologists have been mainly at the individual or micro level, while the latter disciplines have contributed to our understanding of macro concepts – group processes and organization. All leaders who work in organizations will find this course helpful in understanding and guiding the behavior of others in the work place.

EDL 760 <EDLD 7360> Developmental Education and Postsecondary Students.
This course focuses on the populations served by developmental education programs, defines developmental education, and explores the historical perspective of the need for developmental education and student development theories. Students needs, model programs, and best-practices for student learning, development, and retention will be explored through collaboration, research and independent inquiry. Credit 3.

EDL 761 <EDLD 7361> Accountability and Measurement for Contemporary Education.
This course is designed for the study of educational problem solving and accountability and their relationship to needs assessment techniques, evaluation methodologies, and decision-making processes. Prerequisites: Admission to the Ed.D. Program in Educational Leadership and EDL 772. Credit 3.

EDL 762 <EDLD 7362> Methods of Educational Research.
Study of qualitative research with emphasis upon an understanding of statistical concepts and procedures necessary to create and implement effective educational research. This course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing student engagement In research. Prerequisites: Admission to the Ed.D. Program in Educational Leadership. Credit 3.

EDL 763 <EDLD 7363> Application of Educational Research.
Fundamental concepts and tools of research applied to educational problems. Each student will prepare a proposal for the dissertation. This course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing student engagement In research. Prerequisites: Admission to the Ed.D. Program in Educational Leadership and EDL 761. Credit 3.

EDL 764 <EDLD 7364>Outcomes Assessment in Developmental Education.
This course focuses on evaluation criteria and formative and summative evaluation of developmental students. A general model for evaluation of developmental programs, preparation of evaluation reports, and relevant research findings on student and program evaluation will be explored and examined. Prerequisite: Credit 3.

EDL 770 <EDLD 7370> Education Policy and Ethics.
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with opportunities to study how educational policy is developed through micro and macro political elements, to examine ethical and value issues confronting educational leaders, and to demonstrate how individual values drive ethical behavior and ethical decisions. This course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing student engagement In research. Prerequisites: Admission to Ed.D. Program in Educational Leadership. Credit 3.

EDL 771 <EDLD 7371>Contemporary Issues in Higher Education Leadership and Administration.
Students will develop leadership skills in higher education through the integration of knowledge, skills and practice in finding effective solutions for student success strategies, cultural proficiencies, and enrollment management initiatives. Through research, collaboration, and independent inquiry, this course addresses academic advisement, developmental education, and other higher education initiatives in preparation for higher education leadership. Credit 3.

EDL 772 <EDLD 7372> Qualitative Methodology.
This course is designed to teach qualitative research methodology within an educational leadership problems-based contextual framework. The course will emphasize qualitative research techniques through lecture, discussion, readings, and field-based research projects using the methods learned. This course requires knowledge of the literature and ongoing student engagement In research. Prerequisites: Admission to the Ed.D. Program in Educational Leadership and EDL 762. Credit 3.

EDL 773 <EDLD 7373> The American Higher Education System.
This course is designed to teach doctoral students the historical and contemporary role of the American college and university system. The course covers the establishment of the community college as a unique American idea that has become a major component in the postsecondary milieu. The course also focuses on historical, current and emerging issues in the American college setting and the university system. Credit 3.

EDL 774 <EDLD 7374> The College Student.
This course is designed to provide the learner with a foundation in student development. This will include information concerning the current generations of college students and how they develop while they are in college. Learners will also develop an understanding of the theoretical bases for student development and be able to identify the role of student development/services/affairs in developing college students. Credit 3.

EDL 775 <EDLD 7375> Higher Education Finance.
This course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of higher education funding and financing. Specific details of how a budget is built, sources of revenue, objects of expenditures, planning, etc. are covered in the course. Students will learn relevant terms, how to plan, build and implement an institution-wide budget. It is intended to prepare students for leadership positions in higher education by providing a better understanding of financial, budgetary, and planning issues in public post-secondary education. Prerequisite: EDL 773 <EDLD 7373> and EDL 774. Credit 3.

EDL 776 <EDLD 7376> Higher Education Curriculum.
This course examines contemporary issues in higher education curriculum, including transfer, workforce, tech prep, and dual credit. This course can also be taken as elective by doctoral students in other fields of study. Development and assessment processes are explored. Credit 3.

EDL 777 <EDLD 7377> Theory and Practice of Higher Education Leadership.
This course is designed to introduce students to an array of theoretical and practical orientations to leadership in higher education. The course content addresses current and emerging issues of leadership, administration, and management in higher education. Students will become familiar with leadership theories and how to apply to them to a dynamic, multicultural, multi-ethnic educational environment. This course can be taken as an elective by doctoral students in other fields of study. Credit 3.

EDL 778 <EDLD 7378> Higher Education Law and Governance.
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the organization, governance, and administration of higher education. This course is based on analyzing the elements that define colleges, describing models to explain how colleges are organized and managed; and integrating these models with administrative views to influence organizational processes, to include the communication of current issues to other personnel. The course will also focus on legal issues that affect the governance of higher education. This course can be taken as an elective by students in other doctoral programs. Credit 3.

EDL 787 <EDLD 7387> Doctoral Field Studies in Educational Leadership.
This course will provide the doctoral student an opportunity to engage in a detailed and in-depth field study of a program or problem in educational leadership. The student will work under the supervision of a doctoral faculty member and will be expected to produce a written product or presentation. Prerequisites: Admission to the Ed.D. Program in Educational Leadership and permission of Supervising Professor. Credit 3.

EDL 833 <EDLD 8333> Dissertation.
The completion of an approved dissertation which will contribute to Instructional Leadership. Minimum of 9 hours total required. Field-based projects will be emphasized. May be repeated. Prerequisites: Admission to the Ed.D. Program in Educational Leadership; completion of required Leadership Core and Research Component coursework and successful completion of comprehensive exam. Credit 3.

 


 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

EED 510 Workshop in Elementary Education.
This course is designed to explore current topics which affect elementary teachers. One semester hour is offered and the course may be repeated for a maximum of three times.

EED 591 <CIED 5391> Problems in Teaching Elementary Mathematics.
Study is made of recent trends in elementary mathematics programs and instructional approaches. Application of research findings to improving the teaching and learning of mathematics is emphasized.

EED 592 <CIED 5392> Problems in Teaching Elementary Science.
Study is made of recent trends in elementary science programs and instructional approaches. Application of research findings to improving the teaching and learning of science is emphasized.

EED 596 <CIED 5396> Problems in Teaching Social Studies.
Study is made of recent trends in elementary social studies programs and instructional approaches. Application of research findings to improving the teaching and learning of social studies is emphasized.

EED 790 <CIED 7390> Assessment of Mathematics Learning.
This course will be one of four education classes used in the doctoral program in mathematics education. Topics will include classroom assessment, standardized tests, and assessment instruments for research in mathematics education.

EED 793 <CIED 7393> Research in Mathematics Education.
This course will be one of four education classes used in the doctoral program in mathematics education. Topics will include selecting a research topic, research instruments, research statistics, and writing the paper.

EED 795 <CIED 7395> Current Issues in Math Education.
This course will be one of four education classes used in the doctoral program in mathematics education. Topics will include curriculum, textbooks, standards, accountability, parental involvement, legal issues, ethics, and testing.

EED 796 <CIED 7396> Theories of Learning Mathematics.
This course will be one of four education classes used in the doctoral program in mathematics education. Topics will include theories of learning mathematics, information processing, cognitive theories, and constructivist theories.


 

ENGLISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ENGL 5331 <ENG 531> Creative Writing: Fiction.
A graduate writing workshop, this course emphasizes the writing and revision of fiction and creative nonfiction.

ENGL 5332 <ENG 532> Creative Writing: Poetry.
A graduate writing workshop that emphasizes the writing and revision of poetry.

ENGL 5333 <ENG 533> Practicum: Editing and Publishing.
In this course, students study and apply current scholarship in editing and publishing. They have the opportunity to work both on and off campus as writers and editors in various professions.

ENGL 5335 Workshop in Teaching Writing.
This course is a workshop in teaching writing in the secondary schools. It emphasizes applications of current writing theory and research. 

ENGL 5336 <ENG 536> Narrative Theory.
This course focuses on primary texts in narrative theory, in addition to the secondary texts that analyze concepts and research in the field. Considerable attention will be paid to ideological contributions to narrative theory, past and present. 

ENGL 5337 <ENG 537> Poetic Theory and Prosody.
This course focuses on primary texts and readings along with secondary texts that provide analyses of the concepts and research in poetic theory and English prosody. Considerable attention will be paid to ideological contributions to poetic theory from a historical perspective. 

ENGL 5339 <ENG 539> Directed Study of Selected Topics in Literature and Language.
This course, which may be taken only with the written consent of the Department Chair, allows a student to engage a specialized topic in literature or language under the direct supervision of a faculty member. A student may take no more than six credit hours of directed study during his or her graduate career.

ENGL 5367 <ENG 567> Practicum in Teaching College Composition.
This course studies modern rhetorical principles and methodologies used in teaching college-level writing.

ENGL 5368 <ENG 568> Literary Criticism and Theory.
This course studies various theories and theorists of literary interpretation, with application and practice in writing criticism.

ENGL 5369 <ENG 569> Studies in the Novel.
This course studies the emergence and development of the novel as a distinct literary genre. It is designed to allow for reading of the novel in various contexts, from various nations and historical ages, and according to various theoretical emphases.

ENGL 5370 <ENG 570> Studies in Multicultural Literature.
In this course, students apply current theory and research to an analysis of the literatures of underrepresented groups, including but not limited to African Americans, Latinos/as, Chicanos/as, Caribbeans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans. The class, which will explore multicultural literatures within their historical and cultural contexts, may feature various critical approaches and pursue various thematic and aesthetic emphases.

ENGL 5371 <ENG 571> Studies in Modern World Literature.
In this course, students apply current theory and research to an analysis of the works, writers, movements, and genres of world literature from the 19th and 20th centuries. The course is designed to allow for reading both works in translation and Anglophone literatures.

ENGL 5372 <ENG 572> Early American Literature.
In this course, students apply current theory and research to an analysis of the literature, writers, movements, and genres of early America.

ENGL 5374 <ENG 574> Studies in Women's Literature.
In this course, students apply current theory and research to an analysis of selected women writers from various historical ages, genres, and nationalities. Emphases may vary each semester.

ENGL 5375 <ENG 575> Restoration-18th Century British Literature.
In this course, students apply current theory and research to an analysis of the literature, writers, movements, and genres of Restoration and 18th-century Britain.

ENGL 5376 <ENG 576> The Classical Tradition.
This course studies the Greek and Roman literary heritage and its influence upon subsequent literature. Students read ancient and classical works in translation and study the current literature in the field.

ENGL 5377 <ENG 577> Studies in Early and Middle English Literature.
In this course, students apply current theory and research to an analysis of selected works in Old and Middle English literatures.

ENGL 5378 <ENG 578> Studies in Literature of the Renaissance.
In this course, students apply current theory and research to an analysis of the literature, writers, movements, and genres of 16th- and 17th-century Britain. Topics may include studies in Shakespeare, studies in Spenser, and studies in Milton.

ENGL 5379 <ENG 579> Studies in Romantic Literature.
In this course, students apply current theory and research to an analysis of the literature, writers, movements, and genres of the British Romantic age.

ENGL 5380 <ENG 580> Studies in Victorian Literature.
In this course, students apply current theory and research to an analysis of the literature, writers, movements, and genres of the Victorian age.

ENGL 5381 <ENG 581> Studies in British Literature, 1900-the Present.
In this course, students apply current theory and research to an analysis of the literature, writers, movements, and genres of British literature from 1900 to the present.

ENGL 5383 <ENG 583> Studies in English Linguistics.
A thoroughgoing graduate introduction to English linguistics, this course features study in sociolinguistics, dialectology, lexicography, stylistics through linguistic analysis, principles of semantics, and linguistics in relation to the teaching of English.

ENGL 5384 <ENG 584> Studies in Rhetoric and Composition Theory.
This course studies selected topics in historical and contemporary rhetoric, rhetorical criticism, and composition theory. Students will apply current theory and research in rhetoric and composition.

ENGL 5385 <ENG 585> Studies in American Literature, 1800-1860.
In this course, students apply current theory and research to an analysis of the works, writers, movements, and genres of American literature from 1800 to 1860.

ENGL 5386 <ENG 586> Studies in American Literature, 1860-1920.
In this course, students apply current theory and research to an analysis of the works, writers, movements, and genres of American literature from 1860-1920.

ENGL 5387 <ENG 587> Studies in American Literature, 1920-the Present.
In this course, students apply current theory and research to an analysis of the works, writers, movements, and genres of American literature from 1920 to the present.

ENGL 5388 <ENG 588> The Study of Major Figures in American Poetry.
In this course, students apply current theory and research to an analysis of the writers and movements contributing to the development of American poetry.

ENGL 5389 <ENG 589> History and Development of the English Language.
This course is a cultural, historical, and philological study of the development of the English language from its Indo-European prototype through Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-French, and Early Modern English to its present form.

ENGL 5390 <ENG 590> Studies in Technical and Professional Writing.
This course engages students in in-depth study of current issues in technical and professional communication. Students examine the field and conduct primary research.

ENGL 5391 The Study of Major Figures in British Poetry
In this course, students apply current theory and research to a focused and sustained analysis of the careers of major poets who made a substantial contribution to the development of British poetry. The contents and approaches to the class materials will vary from term to term.**

ENGL 6330 Special Topics in English
In this course, students apply current research to an analysis and understanding of a special topic in English language, literature, theory, and/or a writing discipline. The contents and approaches to the materials will vary from term to term.

ENGL 5330 <ENG 697> Graduate Research: Methods and Theories.
Required of all English majors, this course introduces students to graduate-level research methods in literature and to the study of the book.

ENGL 6398 <ENG 698> Thesis I.
In this first semester of graduate thesis, the student works under close faculty supervision to produce a thesis prospectus approved by all members of the reading committee and submits a draft of the introduction.

ENGL 6399 <ENG 699> Thesis II.
In this second semester of graduate thesis, the student works under close faculty supervision to complete the thesis. The student must enroll in this class from term to term until the thesis is completed.

 


 

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

FACS 5323 Interiors and Aging Population
This course provides an in-depth study of how interior environments affect the aging population, primarily focusing on housing issues and options. Emphasis is on policy, needs assessment, finances and physical design.

FACS 5330 <FCS 530> Seminar in Family and Consumer Sciences Research.
A course designed to acquaint graduate students with the need for and contribution of research. Criteria are developed for designing and completing research.

FACS 5341 Family Resource Management
This course focuses on factors impacting family decisions, such as finances, time, energy, and education. Individual and family resources are analyzed for efficient management throughout the life cycle.

FACS 5367 <FCS 567> The Consumer and Food Technology.
Investigations of recent developments in food production and marketing; consideration of physical and chemical factors influencing the quality of food; implications and guidelines for the consumer.

FACS 5375 <FCS 575> Seminar in Recent Developments in Family and Consumer Sciences.
A critical analysis of current trends, issues and problems in Family and Consumer Sciences. Course may be repeated for credit.

FACS 5377 <FCS 577> Workshop in Family and Consumer Sciences Education.
Principles and procedures in planning, organizing, and developing occupational programs using knowledge and skills within the discipline of Family and Consumer Sciences are stressed. Emphasis is on curriculum, space, equipment, methods, and teaching materials particular to these programs.

FACS 5379 <FCS 579> Laboratory and Field Experience in Family and Consumer Sciences.
This course is composed of a supervised internship in an area of specialization. Course may be repeated for credit.

FACS 5380 The Needs of the Aging Population and Their Families.
This courses is focused on the broad principles of family and the effects of the environments, nutrition, physical activities, apparel and textiles, and family transitions related to an aging population. Credit 3.

FACS 5381 Evaluation Techniques in Family and Consumer Sciences.
The focus of this course is on individual and program evaluation theories, designs, and processes applicable to those seeking the MS degree in FACS. Selection and development of instruments as well as interpretation and reporting of data are integrated throughout the course. Credit 3.

FACS 5383 <FCS 583> Research Problems.
This course is tailored to the needs of students in the Dietetic Internship (DI) Program in regard to research, project development, and problem solving. Each student will conduct an individual project. As a team, students will develop a case study based on a nutrition problem with a culturally diverse target population group. Students will develop and market a brochure based on solutions to the developed study.

FACS 6398 <FCS 698> Thesis.
The selection of a suitable problem, a review of related literature, the formulation of a plan of investigation and report. Preparation and approval of a prospectus.

FACS 6399 <FCS 699> Thesis.
The completion and defense of the thesis.


 

FINANCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

FIN 530 <FINC 5300> Business Finance Environment.
An examination of the socioeconomic role the financial sector plays in the business environment. In addition to an introduction to the three financial sector components, students are introduced to financial principles and techniques. This course does not apply to the required MBA curriculum. This course does not apply to the 36-hour graduate credit hour requirement of the MBA degree program or the MS in Finance degree.

FIN 531 <FINC 5310> Introduction to Institutions, Investments, and Managerial Finance.
An examination of financial management in today’s interdependent and integrated global environment. The framework, tools, and concepts of financial institutions, investments, and managerial finance will be emphasized. Topics include managerial and cost accounting applications as well as the use of current techniques for financial analysis, capital allocation, and capital structure. The course uses research writing, case analysis, and presentations to apply the literature to managerial situations. Prerequisites:
Graduate standing, FIN 367 or equivalent.

FIN 532 <FINC 5320> Seminar in Commercial Banking.
A seminar in the current developments within commercial banking and an examination of the specific aspects of the banking industry. The course will utilize both student research and case studies that emphasize managerial application of the literature reviewed.

FIN 533 <FINC 5333> Financial Statement Analysis.
An overview of the pertinent theoretics and various applications relevant to the analysis of financial statements by applying both finance and accounting principles. Emphasis is placed on readings in current literature in the finance and accounting fields. Case studies are used to provide practice and experience in a contemporary business environment. Prerequisites: ACC 366 or ACC 535.

FIN 534 <FINC 5395> Seminar in Commercial Lending.
This is a seminar course with an in-depth coverage of the current lending and regulatory issues and techniques appropriate for management of commercial lending activities in modern financial institutions. Research, readings, and case studies are employed to provide students the opportunity to apply the literature in the dynamic financial institutions industry.

FIN 536 <FINC 5390> Seminar in Business Finance.
Theory and practice of assembling, investing, and managing capital. Major topics include estimating a firm’s cost of funds, basic and advanced capital budgeting techniques including payback period, NPV, IRR, and MIRR, capital structure analysis, dividend policy and practice, risk management and portfolio diversification. Cases, current developments and readings in business finance will be used as appropriate. Prerequisite: FIN 537, FIN 539, and FIN 569

FIN 537 <FINC 5370> Problems in Administrative Finance.
Extensive coverage of financial concepts and techniques. Major topics include time value of money, risk, asset valuation including fixed income securities and stock, financial markets, term structure of interest rates, evaluation of financial performance through financial statement analysis, and asset management. Cases and readings in business finance will be used as appropriate.

FIN 538 <FINC 5338> Selected Topics in Money, Capital, and Security Markets.
An in-depth topical exploration of various aspects of money, capital, and security markets. Topics are explored via analysis of current events and case studies, through examination of the intricacies of financial innovation and adaptation, and via individual research projects.

FIN 539 <FINC 5340> International Finance.
Applies theories of managerial and international finance to the problems of financial management in a global business environment. Topics include investment analysis, financing choices, identification, measurement and management of foreign exchange risks, trade financing, and financial control of international operations.

FIN 569 <FINC 5345> Seminar in Investments.
A study of financial securities, their valuation techniques and the markets in which they are traded. Provides an overview of portfolio theory and the analytical tools of portfolio management, as well as the relationship between risk and return. Includes a survey of current research in investments.

FIN 575 <FINC 5380> Readings in Finance.
This course is designed for the directed study of individual students who wish intensive supervision in some vital aspect of Finance. Prerequisites: GBA 587, FIN 530 <FINC 5300> <FINC 5300> and approval of Department Chair and Graduate Coordinator.

 


FORENSIC SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

FS 514 <FORS 5114> Firearms and Toolmarks.

This course will provide a broad overview of firearm and toolmark identification for forensic purposes. Terminology, function testing and ammunition will be discussed, together with class and individual characteristics, identification criteria and instrumentation. Determination of caliber/gauge, trajectory and distance determination will also be covered. Basic toolmark nomenclature, class and individual characteristics, fracture matching and serial number restoration will also be addressed. Credit 1.

<FORS 5118> Questioned Documents.

This course is designed to provide the students with an understanding of techniques and procedures used for forensic document examination. The course will cover handwriting comparisons, printed documents, document alterations and ink analysis. Credit 1.

FS 515 <FORS 5215> Statistical Genetics for Forensic Science.

This course will focus on the application of statistical methods and theory to forensic genetics. Students must have an introductory knowledge of probability theory and statistics. Fundamental topics like ideal populations, random mating, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, linkage disequilibrium, disturbing forces, inbreeding, four-allele descent measurements, product rule, independence testing and genetic distance will also be covered. Students will analyze and interpret the results from microsatellite population databases using population genetics software. Prerequisite: FORS 5440. Credit 2.

FS 516 <FORS 5116> Seminar in Forensic Science.

This graduate seminar series will focus on research, research methods and the communication of scientific information orally and in writing. Credit 1.

FS 517 <FORS 5117> Controlled Substance Analysis.

This course will introduce the concepts, theories, and principles used in the forensic analysis of controlled substances. Methods of forensic analysis of drugs, including pill identification, microscopic examination, color tests, microcrystalline tests, thin layer chromatography (TLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) will be explored. The source, origin, chemical properties and clandestine manufacture of controlled substances will also be discussed. Students will gain a fundamental understanding of controlled substance analysis in accordance with the standard of practice in an accredited crime laboratory. Credit 1.

FS 526 <FORS 5226> Law and Forensic Sciences.

This course will provide an overview of the law-forensic science interface. This includes legal concepts of admissibility of evidence and proof, rules of evidence, structure and hierarchy of criminal courts, and expert testimony. The course also includes direct and cross examination of students in a moot court setting. Credit 2.

FS 531 <FORS 5231> Techniques for Crime Scene Investigation.

This course will provide an advanced comprehensive review of contemporary techniques for the identification, collection, preservation, and evaluation of evidence found at the crime scene. The assistance of different items of physical evidence in the reconstruction of a crime will be studied. The course includes the application of CSI theory in various applied scenarios. Concepts of physical evidence, evidence collection, quality assurance, and chain custody procedures in forensic analysis will also be covered. Four-hour laboratory. Credit 2.

FS 533 <FORS 5333> Forensic Anthropology.

This course will address theories, methodologies and applications of forensic anthropology. It covers advanced human osteology and includes hands-on training with skeletal remains. Students learn and apply the methods used to construct a human biological profile, which includes the determination of sex, age, and race based on skeletal features. The processes of human decomposition, and the identification of skeletal pathologies and trauma will also be introduced. Three-hour laboratory. Credit 3.

FS 535 <FORS 5335> Trace Evidence and Microscopic Analysis.

This course will review the classifications and characteristics of trace evidence and provide hands-on experience in microscopic examination of physical evidence. A wide variety of chromatographic, spectroscopic, and microscopic techniques, such as stereo microscope, polarized light microscope, digital microscope, comparison microscope, scanning electron microscopy – energy dispersive spectroscopy, micro Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, will be used in this course.  The forensic examination of fiber, hair, glass, paint, gun shot residue (GSR), ink, and explosives will be covered. Four-hour laboratory. Credit 3.

FS 540 <FORS 5440> Forensic Biology.

This course will cover the practical DNA analysis of biological evidence. Different extraction methods will be discussed as well as techniques for the quantification of  DNA. Students will be introduced to emerging forensic DNA methods such as identifying the tissue of origin, and assessing the level of DNA degradation and PCR inhibitors in a biological sample.  Strategies for the analysis of PCR products (autosomal and Y chromosome STRs), interpretation of results, biostatistics and quality assurance procedures will be covered. Basic statistical genetics theory will be approached to generate a final DNA report. Four-hour laboratory. Credit 4.

FS 545 <FORS 5445> Forensic Instrumental Analysis.

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the analytical methodology, approaches and instrumentation used for forensic analysis. Fundamental qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis using advanced instrumentation will be reviewed.  A wide variety of techniques that are used in a number of forensic disciplines will be covered. Well established methods and novel approaches will be discussed. Four-hour laboratory. Credit 4.

FS 546 <FORS 5446> Forensic Toxicology.

This course will explore the physico-chemical characteristics of drugs and poisons of forensic interest. The course will focus on human performance and postmortem forensic toxicology applications. The course will address pharmacological and analytical challenges associated with biological evidence. It will address qualitative and quantitative analysis of compounds from biological and non-biological matrices and provide hands-on experience with chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques that are widely used in forensic laboratories. Four-hour laboratory. Credit 4.

FS 560 <FORS 5360> Pattern and Physical Evidence Concepts. 

This course will introduce the interpretation of pattern evidence and the forensic analysis of physical evidence.  Scientific experiments and analysis of pattern in support of crime scene reconstruction will be discussed.  Pattern recognition of physical evidence, such as bloodstains, gunshot residues, tire prints, shoeprints, fire debris, explosive, glass fracture, body gesture, and wound patterns, will be covered.  Physical and chemical techniques for the visualization or enhancement of varies types of patterns will also be introduced. Expert interpretation of observed pattern of physical evidence will be discussed. Four-hour laboratory. Credit 3.

FS 561 <FORS 5361> Advanced Forensic DNA.

This course will cover the practical DNA analysis of extremely degraded biological evidence including hair shafts, nails, teeth and bones. Different extraction methods will be discussed and practically applied. Techniques for quantification of minimal amounts of DNA, RNA profiling, alternative strategies for DNA analysis (low copy number, SNPs, X-STRs) and DNA sequencing (mtDNA), interpretation of results, biostatistics, and standard operation procedures will also be covered. Prerequisite: FORS 5440. Four-hour laboratory. Credit 3.

<FORS 6014> Forensic Science Research.

This capstone experience allows students to formally apply their acquired knowledge and skills in forensic science. This course consists of an independent research project which culminates in a formal written report or manuscript. Additionally, students are required to present and defend their scientific research orally in a public forum. Credit 1.

<FORS 6094> Special Topics in Forensic Science.

This course is adaptable to the needs and interests of the individual graduate students majoring in Forensic Science. Variable credit 1 to 4.

FS 624 <FORS 6224> Quality Assurance and Ethical Conduct in Forensic Science.

This course will introduce the concepts and procedures associated with quality assurance and ethical conduct in forensic science. Credit 2.

<FORS 6333> Behavioral Genetics

This course provides students with an understanding of behavior genetics and the influence of genes and the environment on emotion, personality and behavior in humans and animals. Credit 3.

<FORS 6346> Advanced Forensic Chemistry

This course will address novel scientific techniques in crime scene chemistry and crime lab chemistry. Non-destructive optical methods developed for sensing or identifying physical evidence are particularly emphasized in this course. New developments in chromatographic, spectroscopic and microscopic techniques for the analysis of fibers, hair, gunshot residue, ink, paints, glass, explosives and narcotics will also be explored. Prerequisite: FORS 5335, FORS 5445. Credit 3.

FS 646 <FORS 6346> Advanced Forensic Toxicology.

This course will focus on advanced principles and practices in forensic toxicology, in particular advanced analytical, methodological and interpretive issues. Students will apply their knowledge of basic forensic toxicology principles to a variety of analytical and interpretive topics relevant to behavioral and postmortem toxicology including but not limited to impaired driving, sexual assault and death investigation. Prerequisite: FORS 5446. Credit 3

FS 671 <FORS 6371> Internship in Forensic Science.

This is a ten week full-time internship in an approved forensic science laboratory. This opportunity allows graduate students to apply their theoretical knowledge, practical skills and abilities in a forensic science setting. Credit 3.

<FORS 7331> Research Methods

This course focuses on the scientific method, research methods and design. The course provides students the opportunity to discover, structure, and formulate research questions. Through this process students come to understand the many ways in which researchers can acquire knowledge.

<FORS 7332> Scientific Communications

This course develops oral and written communication skills necessary for forensic science researchers and practitioners. Students must develop mastery of the following: technical report writing with regard to standard operating procedures, scientific publications and grant proposals; oral presentations, depositions and courtroom testimony of scientific evidence. Prerequisite: FORS 5226. Credit 3.

<FORS 7334> Social Science of Forensics

This course addresses the nexus between social and behavioral principles and the conduct of forensic science. Topics addressed include the organization of the forensic enterprise including the structure and functioning of forensic crime labs; performance assessment of forensic systems, organizations and practitioners; sociological, social-psychological, and psychological factors.

<FORS 7381> Explosive Analysis and Detection

This course surveys the broad field of explosive engineering and detection to include the safety and transportation classifications. Chemical and physical properties, explosive reagents and byproducts and detection techniques are addressed. It includes military and improvised devices, post-blast evidence and constitutional aspects of interdiction. Prerequisite: CHEM 4440 or FORS 5445. Credit 3.

<FORS 7385> Warfare Agents

This course evaluates chemical, biological and radiological warfare agents. These agents are discussed from a chemical and biochemical standpoint including structure, function, mechanism of action, injury, clinical therapy, and recovery. Three credit hours of biochemistry or toxicology at the undergraduate or graduate level are recommended for students taking this course. Credit 3.

<FORS 7389> Practicum

The practicum affords the doctoral student the opportunity to apply research in a practical setting, adapt technologies for maximal use, appreciate the steps necessary for the implementation of new technology within an accredited environment, and observe the technical and non-technical processes involved. During the practicum students must complete the equivalent of a ten-week, full-time placement (400 hours) in an approved forensic science laboratory or facility. Prerequisite FORS 6371. Credit 3.

<FORS 7390> Forensic Laboratory Management

This course addresses key areas of forensic laboratory management and leadership. It prepares students for administrative and leadership roles in public or private sector forensic science laboratories. It focuses on the integration of technical and discipline specific policies and procedures into the administrative framework of the crime laboratory. Issues include the quality management system, organizational efficiency, fiscal, personnel and resource management, regulation, certification and accreditation. Credit 3.

<FORS 8099> Dissertation

Variable credit 1 to 3.


 

GENERAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

GBA 562 <BUAD 5355> Managerial Law.
This course prepares managers to be cognizant of the legal implications of their decisions regardless of their specific area of responsibility. The course focuses on researching legal issues and developing strategies from the standpoint of management - from supervisory level to Board of Directors. Emphasis is placed on research strategies that executives can use to generate pragmatic legal strategies to minimize legal expenses and legal liabilities. The research strategies are oriented toward sources that can quickly be analyzed and implemented rather than traditional legal research for law firms. Assignments result in real world business research memos.

GBA 564 <BUAD 5348> Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice.
An intensive examination of the theories of entrepreneurship, innovation, and intellectual entrepreneurship. Students will research the major steps of starting a business including developing their own Personal Entrepreneurship Plan. Course emphasizes converting intellectual capital into financial capital. Topics for extensive research include self-assessment, opportunity screening, developing a marketing system, growth strategies, and financial strategies.

GBA 575 <BUAD 5380> Readings In Business Administration.
This course is designed for the directed study of individual students who wish intensive supervision in some vital aspect of Business Administration. Prerequisite: GBA 587 <BUAD 5310> <BUAD 5310> and Approval of Department Chair and Graduate Coordinator.

GBA 587 <BUAD 5310> Research Writing In Business.
This course is designed to expand students’ understanding of management and corporate communications and enhance managerial writing and speaking skills. Research projects and case studies prepare students to conduct business research and to report results.


 

GEOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

GEOL 5395 <GEL 595> Special Graduate Topics in Geology.
Individual study in special areas of geology. Topic content to be selected and agreed upon by the students and member of the geology faculty. Credit 1-3.


GEOGRAPHY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

GEOG 5361 <GEO 531> Geographic Information.
This course examines how geospatial data are obtained, created, edited and utilized. This includes examination of the availability and accuracy of geospatial date, geospatial portals, and the digitizing and scanning of geographic data. The creation and structure of attribute databases, and relational and object-oriented date structures also will be discussed. Credit 3.

GEOG 5362 <GEO 532> GIS Principles and Application.

GEOG 5363 <GEO 533> Internet GIS.

This course introduces the principles and practices of interactive mapping and GIS data distribution across the Internet. Students will learn to develop Internet GIS applications using Arc Internet Map Server (ArcIMS). Credit 3.

GEOG 5364 <GEO 534> Spatial Analysis.

This course introduces the fundamental knowledge and techniques of spatial analysis. It teaches students how to effectively use various spatial date to solve real-world problems. Topics covered include spatial data structure, multiple layer operations, point pattern analysis and network analysis. Prerequisite GEOG 5361. Credit 3.

GEOG 5365 <GEO 535> Digital Image Processing.

Students will develop theoretical understanding and technical proficiency in remote sensing image analysis. Students will perform image processing functions and will be exposed to all critical phases of project implementation expected of an image analyst. Extensive lab exercises are required. Prerequisite GEO 5361. Credit 3.

GEOG 5366 <GEO 536> Cartography and Visualization.

GEOG 5367 <GEO 537> GIS Programming.

This course teaches students to use Visual Basic for Application (VBA) to develop customized GIS applications. Students will become familiar with the fundamental concepts in object-oriented programming and develop programming skills. Prerequisite GEOG 5361. Credit 3.

GEOG 5368 <GEO 538> GIS Program Use and Applications.

GEOG 5369 <GEO 539> Internship in GIS.

Students will work for either a business or government agency to obtain applied experience in the use of GIS. Students must be supervised by a member of the graduate faculty, who will determine whether the nature and amount of the work performed satisfies the requirements for graduate credit. In addition, students must be evaluated by their employer, and this information must be submitted to the Department Chair to be used in assignment of a grade for the course. Students are encouraged to maintain a journal and to present a paper recounting their internship experiences. Prerequisites: GEOG 5361, GEOG 5362. Credit 3.

GEOG 5765 <GEO 575> Selected Problems in Geography.
This course is designed for individual students who wish intensive supervision in their research or study of special topics in the field of Geography. Credit 1-3.

GEOG 6161 <GEO 611> Graduate Seminar in GIS.

GEOG 6261 <GEO 621> Seminar in Applied GIS Research Methods.

GEOG 6398 <GEO 698> Thesis I.
The student will begin work on a thesis involving research and study of the applications of geographic information systems and related technologies. Prerequisites: GEOG 5361, GEOG 5362, GEOG 5363, GEOG 5364, GEOG 5367. Credit 3.

GEOG 6099 <GEO 699> Thesis II.

Credit 3.


 

HEALTH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

HED 531 <HLTH 5331> Foundations of Community Health.
The epidemiological, biostatistical methods of investigation are applied to international, national, state, and local health issues. Additionally, the historical and philosophical foundations of community health are presented with an orientation to current health programs, medical care trends, and health problems experienced by diverse populations.

HED 532 <HLTH 5332> Human Ecology.
A study of the major factors which determine health or illness, including how populations respond to various determinants of health including lifestyle, heredity, environment, and health care resources.

HED 533 <HLTH 5333> Colloquium in Human Sexuality.
A study of all the factors influencing growth and development. Consideration of the special problems including developing family life, sexuality issues, intimate relationships, and the cultural impact they have on society.

HED 534 <HLTH 5334> Colloquium in the Use and Abuse of Drugs.
A value education approach to the prevention of drug use and abuse is presented along with personal, family, community and school factors influencing drug use. The origins and derivations of drugs are explored. The mental, emotional, physical, social and physiological effects from the use of drugs will be analyzed.

HED 538 <HLTH 5338> Colloquium in Consumer Health Education.
The study of consumer goods and services as related to the health of individuals, their family and their community. Marketing principles for health promotion and current health care bioethical issues are addressed.

HED 560 <HLTH 5360> Communication Theory and Practice for Community Educators.

A laboratory experience built around research on motivational concepts as they influence changes, perception, attitudes, values and behavior. Diffusion patterns, group discussion and decision making, and interviewing techniques will be covered. Attention will be given to the selection, use, and evaluation of media, materials, visual aids, press, radio, mass media, etc.

HED 561 Theoretical Foundations of Health Education and Health Promotion.

A study of the history, philosophy, and practices of Health Education. Exploration and application of behavioral science concepts and methodologies to community health education and in-service training of health professionals. Case studies and other practice models will be used.

HED 563 <HLTH 5363> Leadership in Health Promotion and Sport Management.
This course is designed for the individual who will assume some type of supervisory position in health promotion or sport management. The course’s focal point involves exposure to administrative skills required of those who serve in a leadership capacity.

HED 565 <HLTH 5365> Aging and Health Promotion.
A discussion of health promotion issues for the elderly including physical assessment, chronic care, health care maintenance, psychological adaptation, nutrition, and other current topics.

HED 574 <HLTH 5374> Research Seminar.
A study is made of research techniques, identification of problems, research designs and data gathering procedures. Students will develop a proposal for a research project.

HED 575 <HLTH 5375> Statistical Design in Health And Kinesiology.
Principles of advanced statistical techniques and measurement theory with emphasis upon their application to Health, Kinesiology, and related areas will be presented.

HED 577 <HLTH 5377> Independent Studies.
The student with specific interest and background experience in a specialized area will have the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts in a laboratory situation. The student may have practical experiences in a clinic, agency, special school or other types of institutions. Prerequisite: Permission of the Graduate Coordinator.

HED 696 <HLTH 6396> Health Program Planning: Pre-Internship.
A comprehensive review of the components of health program planning with emphasis on the socio-economical, cultural, and political factors that influence the health status of a community. Emphasis is focused on a comprehensive approach to health program planning and behavior change models.

HED 697 <HLTH 6397> Internship in Health Education.
Professional field experience conducted in an approved setting for health education within the medical community, workplace or school setting. The 300 hour practicum is facilitated under the supervision of a qualified health educator or approved preceptor.

HED 698 <HLTH 6398> Thesis.
This phase of the thesis investigation includes the completion of the review of the related literature, formulation of the research design and procedures and related pilot studies. Some data collection may also occur, and the thesis symposium must be completed to the satisfaction of the advisor and members of the thesis committee.

HED 699 <HLTH 6399> Thesis.
This phase of the thesis work includes the completion of the data collection, as well as the actual writing and defense of the thesis.


 

HISTORY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

HIST 5333 Topics in the History of the Pre-Modern World. The topic will vary by semester and pertain to a major historical development in the world prior to the sixteenth century. Topics include War in the Ancient World, Comparative World Religions, and Studies in Islamic Civilization. Readings will include important primary sources as well as secondary sources works. Credit 3.

HIST 5336 Topics in the History of Pre-Modern Europe.
The topic will vary by semester and pertain to a major historical development in Europe prior to the sixteenth century. Topics include Early Medieval Europe 300-1000, the Roman Empire, and Europe in the Era of Crusades 1000-1500. Readings will include important primary sources as well as secondary works. Credit 3.

HIST 5340 <HIS 540> Recent African-American History.
This course will familiarize graduate students with the African-American experience in United States history since the end of the Civil War.  Topics include Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, national political leadership and intellectual thought, the Great Migrations, World War I, the "New Negro" and Harlem Renaissance, the labor movement, the Great Depression and World War II, and the modern Civil Rights Movement. Credit 3.

HIST 5362 <HIS 562> Seminar in Environmental History
This course is an examination of the complex relationship between nature and society in American history. Students will study economics, land-use patterns and natural ecosystems along with the corresponding dramatic changes in natural and human communities that engender strong social and political responses. Credit 3.

HIST 5363 <HIS 563> Seminar in Military History.
Selected topics in Military History. Credit 3.

HIST 5370 <HIS 570> Colonial America.
This course examines the issues, peoples, and perspectives that shaped Colonial America. Topics will vary by term but may include exploration, settlement, and maturation of the North American colonies. Credit 3.

HIST 5371 <HIS 571> Revolutionary America.
This is essentially a readings oriented course. Broad themes from the colonial-revolutionary period will be singled out. Readings will be assigned to familiarize students with the general themes. More specific readings will be assigned and individual reports will be discussed at length in class. Credit 3.

HIST 5372 <HIS 572> Early National America.
Studies tracing the development of the United States from 1783 to 1840; the failure of the Confederation; organization of government under the Constitution; the Federalist Period; Jeffersonian democracy; the War of 1812; national growth in the post-war period; political and economic change; the party structure; the rise of Jackson; and social reform. Credit 3.

HIST 5373 <HIS 573> The American Civil War and Reconstruction.
Studies intended to cover selected topics in the political, military, economic, and social institutions of the United States during the Civil War Era. Students will explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources. Credit 3.

HIST 5374  Seminar in the History of the American South
This course examines the diverse history, peoples, and cultures that have occupied the American South. The topic will vary by semester, among those topics are economic and political history, religion, race, literature, the Civil Rights movement, and women's experience. The course constitutes the core of a Southern history concentration.  Credit 3.

HIST 5375 <HIS 575> Recent America, 1876-1933. Studies designed to cover social, economic, cultural, diplomatic and political developments of late-nineteenth and 20th century America. Students will explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources. Credit 3.

HIST 5376 <HIS 576> Contemporary America, 1933-Present.
This course will offer a careful survey of United States history since 1933, including such topics as the Great Depression, the New Deal, the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Feminist Movement, the Watergate Crisis, the Iranian Hostage Crisis, the Reagan Era, the End of the Cold War, and the Roots of 9/11. Students will explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources. Credit 3.

HIST 5377 <HIS 577> The American West.
This course covers the American West as a region with a strong emphasis on the 19th century. It will explore the interpretive development of the field as it has progressed from a traditional focus on Anglo expansion to a more balanced view that embraces race, gender, and the workaday West. Students will explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources.

HIST 5378 American Cultural and Religious History
A study of selected topics int he cultural and religious history of the people of North American; the course focuses on the patterns of belief and values held by American men and women which have shaped each major period from colonial times to the present. Credit 3.

HIST 5380 <HIS 580> American Historiography.
This course is an intensive readings course for graduate students in major topics of interest among American historians.  Students will understand the complex nature of historical practice and the development of past and current fields within the discipline. Students will explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources. Credit 3.

HIST 5382 <HIS 582> Topics in the History of Women.
A study of selected topics in the history of women; the course focuses on the experiences of women of diverse cultural, racial, and ethnic backgrounds. The course examines women’s responses to social forces during critical periods in their history. Students will explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources. Credit 3.

HIST 5383 <HIS 583> United States Diplomatic History.
This course is a study of selected topics tracing the development of United States foreign policy from 1775 to the present. Topics may include diplomacy of the Revolutionary Era; the Early Republic; Manifest Destiny; the Civil War Era; Imperialism and Expansion; the Great Crusade and after; World War II; and the Cold War. The emphasis is on the forces that have influenced diplomacy and on the changing interpretations of United States foreign policy. Students will explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources. Credit 3.

HIST 5384 <HIS 584> Texas History.
An in-depth examination of Texas history, including study of indigenous peoples, Spanish colonization, the Mexican era, Anglo- and African- American settlement, the Revolution and Republic period, statehood, Civil War and Reconstruction, the cattle kingdom, the oil industry, and political and economic modernization. The course may be conducted as either a research or reading seminar. Students will explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources. Credit 3.

HIST 5385 <HIS 585> Latin American History.

The topics for this course will vary from semester to semester among such subjects as the diplomatic, political, social, and intellectual history of specific geographical areas in Latin America; i.e., Mexico, the Caribbean, the Anglo-Spanish border lands, or South America. Students will explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources. Credit 3.

HIST 5388 <HIS 588> Public History.
This course will introduce students to aspects of public history including historic preservation, museum studies, living history interpretation, archival arrangement and description, grant writing, and news media.  Student projects vary by semester.  Credit 3.

HIST 5389 <HIS 589> Great Britain and British Empire.
The topics for this course will vary from semester to semester among various chronological periods and will deal specifically with British religious, political, social, cultural, economic and imperial history. Students will explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources. Credit 3.

HIST 5391 <HIS 591> Asian History.
The topics for this course will vary from semester to semester among such subjects as the diplomatic, political, social, economic and intellectual history of specific geographical areas in Asia, i.e. East Asia, the Subcontinent, and South East Asia. Students will explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources. Credit 3.

HIST 5393 <HIS 593> European Diplomatic History.
Studies covering selected topics in the history of European international politics from the 18th through the 20th century. Alternate emphasis will be placed on Eastern and Western Europe as well as on different eras of diplomacy, at the discretion of the instructor. Students will explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources. Credit 3.

HIST 5394 <HIS 594> Early Modern Europe The course covers the 15th-18th centuries and considers how the foundations for Modern Europe were established amid the dynamic if not wrenching transformation from a medieval way of life characterized by religious concerns, kingdoms, a predominately agrarian economy, and a rigid social order, to a modern one marked by science and secularism, sovereign states, a commercialized and industrializing capitalist economy, and a more socially diverse and mobile world. Students will explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources. Credit 3.

HIST 5395 <HIS 595 > Later Modern Europe.
A study of selected topics in Later Modern European History. Students will explore major recent historical interpretations and/or conduct research in primary sources. Credit 3.

HIST 5097 <HIS 597> Independent Study.
This is a course designed for studies of individually selected topics not specifically provided in any of the formal courses. Prerequisite: Consent of History Department Chair. Credit 3.

HIST 6394 <HIS 694> Seminar in History.
This course is a research seminar in which students will develop skills in locating, extracting, evaluating, and synthesizing historical information and writing an article-length paper based on primary sources. Students may also be expected to supplement their research with other readings under the direction of the professor.

HIST 6098 <HIS 698> Thesis I.
Credit 3.

HIST 6099 <HIS 699> Thesis II.
Credit 3.

 


 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

INED 5310 <IE 531> GRADUATE HUMAN RELATIONS FOR VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL INDUSTRIAL TEACHERS.
This course is designed to meet the needs of the competent tradesman in understanding and working with students. Parallel course to INED 4310 <IE 431>.

INED 5365 <IE 565> METHODS AND MEDIA IN VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION.
Success in most professional areas is dependent in part on the ability of an individual to communicate effectively with others. An inventory of media used in communications will be made. Various means and equipment for aiding the communication of ideas will be studied and evaluated.

INED 5379 <IE 579> INSTRUCTIONAL/PRODUCTION ANALYSIS.
This course is a study of the inventory and analysis procedure by which the essential elements of an occupation or production scheduling activity are identified and listed for instruction or production purposes. The analysis determines the instructional or production format necessary for a smooth and orderly process from the simple to the complex order of tasks, operation and jobs required in the industrial environment.

INED 5382 <IE 582> VOCATIONAL STUDENT IDENTIFICATION AND FOLLOW-UP.
Techniques for identifying students for vocational training; sources and means of job placement for co-operative part-time students and graduates of vocational programs; and methods of making student follow-up studies are included. 

INED 5386 <IE 586> TEACHING AIDS IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION.
This course is designed to aid teachers of industrial subjects in the design and construction of teaching aids. The study of multi-media is an integral and important phase of this course.

INED 5391 <IE 591> LABORATORY ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT.
This course is designed for graduates who are going to teach Industrial Education or manage equipment and supplies in industry. It is to prepare students to successfully manage laboratory activities, organize laboratories in accordance with contemporary concepts, and to control materials/supplies within their laboratories. Parallel course to INED 4391 <IE 491>.


 

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ITEC 5398 <IT 568> History And Philosophy Of Industrial Education.
This course is designed to provide the opportunities for in-depth study of the historical background of the industrial education movement.

ITEC 5369 <IT 569> Special Topics in Industrial Science.
This course will examine advanced special topics/issues and (or) subject matter in the field of Industrial Technology.  The sub-divisional fields offered are: Industrial Technology, Industrial Management, Design and Development, and Construction. This course may be repeated as topics and subject matter change.

ITEC 5390 <IT 590> Directed Studies.
This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to gain specialized experience in one or more of the following areas: Internship, Laboratory Procedures, Individualized Study, Innovative Curriculum, Workshops, Specialized Training Schools, Seminar. In the internship and laboratory procedures segment, the student will gain organization and management techniques through observation and participation in conducting classroom activities and associated laboratory experience. The student may gain experience in a maximum of two areas of competency. In the individualized studies segment, the student will select a problem and work under the direction of a major professor. 1-6 hours, may be repeated or taken concurrently for a maximum of six hours. (Area of study to be indicated on transcript.)

ITEC 6331 <IT 631> Plant Layout And Materials Handling.
A study of the methods in planning and control of production; operation analysis; routing; scheduling and dispatching; production charts and boards; inventory control; accumulation of material requirements; and use of critical path techniques used in industry.

ITEC 6334 <IT 634> Materials Test Technology.
A study of internal stresses and deformation of bodies resulting from the action of external forces; concepts and techniques of testing tensile, compression, shear, transverse, hardness and the elasticity on various materials and fasteners.

ITEC 6335 <IT 635> Principles And Techniques Of Research In Industrial Education.
A study of the basic principles of research and the techniques of application as related to Industrial Education.

IT 6098 <ITEC 698> Thesis.
In addition to the preliminary study of the techniques of research, these course involve completion of a bibliography, organization of material, selection of a suitable problem, a digest of related literature, selection of appropriate procedures, formulation of a plan of investigating and reporting, collection and organization of data, and the writing of the thesis.

IT 699 <ITEC 6399> Thesis.
In addition to the preliminary study of the techniques of research, these course involve completion of a bibliography, organization of material, selection of a suitable problem, a digest of related literature, selection of appropriate procedures, formulation of a plan of investigating and reporting, collection and organization of data, and the writing of the thesis.

 


 

KINESIOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

KIN 534 <KINE 5334> Practicum.
An internship experience in a personal working environment, organizational setting. Supervisory assistance by project staff occurs at frequent intervals.

KIN 562 <KINE 5362> Legal Issues in Sport.
An examination of legal factors affecting Physical Education, amateur athletics and professional sport. Analysis will involve teachers, coaches, officials, spectators, medical personnel, owners of sports teams, and commercial suppliers of equipment and products used within an activity setting.

KIN 563 <KINE 5363> Leadership in Health Promotion and Sport Management.
This course is designed for the individual who will assume some type of supervisory position in health promotion or sport management. The course’s focal point involves exposure to administrative skills required of those who serve in a leadership capacity.

KIN 567 <KINE 5367> Advanced Physiology of Exercise.

Advanced content reflecting the scientific principles underlying exercise is coupled with an emphasis on laboratory experiences. Students will be required to conduct an applied research project on a topic of their choice. Prerequisite: KIN 373 or permission of instructor.

KIN 570 <KINE 5370> Sport Marketing: Theory and Practice.
This course covers the essentials of sport marketing which includes planning, promotions, operations, and market analysis. The fundamental principles used in the marketing of sport, products, events, and the importance of service quality will also be examined. Students will be exposed to the latest research in the field and will interact with industry professionals.

KIN 571 <KINE 5371> Sport Finance and Sales.
Students will learn financial concepts associated with franchise operations, stadium funding proposals, budgets, and bond referendums. In addition, franchise revenue streams will be discussed in detail. Students will be exposed to a variety of different sales strategies and tactics that can be applied to the sport industry and will also be exposed to the latest research and professional trends in the field.

KIN 572 <KINE 5372> Youth Fitness.
This course is designed to provide participants with specific background and knowledge in how to appropriately plan programs geared to improving the fitness of youth. Central to this course is the development of an attitude that perceives youth fitness as a significant part of the school curriculum. This course will prepare individuals to promote youth fitness in an effective and scientific manner.

KIN 573 <KINE 5373> Event and Facility Management.
Practical application of the principles and theory related to planning, organization, and execution of sport and entertainment events will be addressed. Fund raising and charity management will be considered, as will the management of small and large scale facilities and event venues. Site visits and interactions with local sport organizations will also take place.

KIN 574 <KINE 5374> Research Seminar.
A study is made of research techniques, identification of problems, research designs and data gathering procedures. Students will develop a proposal for a research project.

KIN 575 <KINE 5375> Statistical Design in Health and Kinesiology.
Principles of advanced statistical techniques and measurement theory, with emphasis upon their application to Health, Kinesiology, and related areas, will be presented.

KIN 577 <KINE 5377> Independent Studies.
This course is adaptable to the needs and interests of the individual student. Students with specific interests are provided the opportunity to investigate and make application in theoretical, laboratory, or field experience approaches to their area of concentration. Prerequisites: KIN 574. A proposal is submitted to the faculty sponsor and the Chair of the Health and Kinesiology Graduate Committee the semester before the student plans to register for this course.

KIN 579 <KINE 5379> Management of Adult Fitness Programs.
An analysis of factors associated with the management of commercial, corporate and hospital-based wellness programs. Special attention will be given to the purpose, development and maintenance of such programs.

KIN 580 <KINE 5380> Ethics in Sport Management.
This course is an examination of ethical theory and moral decision making as related to the management of sport. Graduate students will review research findings and current literature relevant to issues affecting concepts of ethics and morality in the management of sport. Through introspection, students will develop and express their philosophy toward ethics and morality.

KIN 589 <KINE 5389> Sports in American Culture.
The course explores North American sport from a viewpoint that sport is a microcosm of society. Social structures, sub-cultures, and ethics are explored.

KIN 592 <KINE 5392> Program Development in Kinesiology.
This course is designed to examine movement patterns and the developmental progression of motor actions in children and adolescents. The focus will be on how to create challenging curricula, while improving instructional skills.

KIN 593 <KINE 5393> Advanced Studies in the Psychology of Sport.

An advanced study of the psychological factors that affect, and are influenced by, sports participation. Both the coach and the athlete are considered in this analysis.

KIN 595 <KINE 5395> Advanced Biomechanics.
The mechanical analysis of motion as it applies to the human musculoskeletal system. The course stresses advanced concepts of functional anatomy, linear and angular kinetics and kinematics, and application of those concepts in a laboratory/research setting. Emphasis is placed on data collection and evaluation in a semester research project. Prerequisite: KIN 362 or permission of instructor.

KIN 597 <KINE 5397> Current Issues in Kinesiology.
This course will include topics and specific issues germane to current concerns in the areas of Physical Education, health-related wellness, sport on the professional level, and interscholastic and intercollegiate athletics. Students will be required to complete a research project requiring data collection and analysis.

KIN 598 <KINE 5398> Significance of Motor Learning.
This course will present the theoretical and experimental bases for the understanding of human behavior in movement. Areas of study include feedback manipulation, motor programming, dynamic systems theory, generalizability of schema, forgetting, and compatibility analysis. Students are required to plan and conduct a research study testing a motor learning postulate of their own choosing. Prerequisite: KIN 322 or permission of instructor.

KIN 599 <KINE 5399> Workshop in Kinesiology, Recreation, and Sport.
An intensive laboratory-oriented experience for practitioners seeking to upgrade teaching, coaching, or leadership competencies in areas related to Kinesiology, Coaching, and Athletics. May be repeated for credit with approval of the Chair of the Health and Kinesiology Graduate Committee.

KIN 698 <KINE 6398> Thesis.
This phase of the thesis investigation includes the completion of the review of the related literature, formulation of the research design and procedures and related pilot studies. Some data collection may also occur, and the thesis symposium must be completed to the satisfaction of the advisor and members of the thesis committee.

KIN 699 <KINE 6399> Thesis.
This phase of the thesis includes the completion of the data collection, as well as the actual writing and defense of the thesis.


 

LIBRARY SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

LS 530 <LSSL 5330> Collection Development.
Introduces principles of selection of library materials and procedures involved in building collections for all types of libraries, archives, and information centers. Includes latest technological developments, research theories and site-based applications. Required for certification and MLS.

LS 532 <LSSL 5332> Organization of Collections I.
Introduces the principles of descriptive cataloging, classification, and subject analysis using the latest editions of the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, the Dewey Decimal Classification, and Library of Congress subject headings. Focuses on broad-based use of the MARC format. Provides an overview of various types of bibliographic control, technical services in libraries and processing centers, and commercial and shared cataloging utilities. Required for certification and MLS.

LS 534 <LSSL 5334> Information Services and Resources I.
Introduces skills, techniques, and philosophy of the reference process, with emphasis on the interview and strategies. Examines and discusses basic reference tools using specific evaluative criteria. Analyzes library systems, networks, automated databases, latest trends and research in the field of reference. Covers online commercial databases, the Internet, and laser optical disc searching techniques. Required for certification and MLS.

LS 537 <LSSL 5337> School Library Administration.
Discusses planning, organizing, policymaking, staffing, budgeting, facilities planning, decision-making, and services. Emphasizes the study of standards, trends, services, research, and evaluation of the library. Prerequisites: LS 530 <LSSL 5330> , 532 <5332>, 534 <5334>. Required for certification and MLS.`

LS 560 <LSSL 5360> Literature for Children.
Acquaints students with the selection, critical analysis, and historical development of literature for children. Emphasis is placed on selecting recreational and informational materials for children reflecting our multicultural society; identifying techniques, activities, and strategies that motivate children to read and respond to literature; and developing critical abilities for evaluating literature for children. Required for certification and MLS.

LS 561 <LSSL 5361> Current Trends in Materials for Children and Young Adults.
Introduces recent trends in materials for children and young adults, with emphasis on multicultural understanding. Elective. Prerequisites: LS 560 <LSSL 5360> , 570 <5370>, and 585 <5385>.

LS 564 <LSSL 5364> Information Services and Resources II.
Introduces the study of reference materials and services on a specialized level and modes of searching, including online and laser optical techniques. Develops expertise in solving reference problems through role playing, case studies, etc. Analyzes the latest trends and research in reference methods and technology, e.g., the Internet and networking. Covers grantsmanship and proposal writing as instruments in securing funding for information resources. Elective. Prerequisites: LS 530 <LSSL 5330> , 534 <5334>, 560 <5360>, 570 <5370>.

LS 566 <LSSL 5366> Library Internship.
Provides supervised practice in a school library; incorporates seminars, conferences, journal, and evaluation. Required for certification and MLS. Prerequisites: LS 530 <LSSL 5330> , 532 <5332>, 534 <5334>, 537 <5337>, 560 <5360>, 570 <5368>, and 585 <5385>.

LS 567 <LSSL 5367> Research Design and Methodology.
Introduces the study of research methods, project designs, and data-gathering instruments pertinent to libraries. Applies research techniques to issues related to school libraries. Emphasizes the production of a research or grant proposal. Required for MLS. Prerequisite: LS 570 <LSSL 5370> .

LS 568 <LSSL 5368> Library Services and Programs for Children and Young Adults.
Presents programming of children and young adult services, including promotional activities, storytelling, book talks, reading guidance, library skills and instruction, innovative projects, and informal library use. Studies trends and evaluation of research in the area. Elective. Prerequisite: LS 560 <LSSL 5360> , 570 <,5370>, and 585 <5385>.

LS 570 <LSSL 5370> Instructional Design and Library Media Production.
Introduces the philosophy of school librarianship and the professional role of the librarian in a school environment. This course emphasizes using the latest instructional technology and serves as an introduction to the Library Science program. Required for certification and MLS.

LS 575 <LSSL 5375> Directed Individual Study in Library Science.
Features independent research based on a submitted research proposal. Elective. Prerequisite: Requires approval of Department Chair,

LS 580 <LSSL 5380> Master's Seminar.
Features the in-depth study of specialized subjects; may be repeated as topics vary.  Examples of topics: Study Abroad, and Art Seminar. Prerequisites: Appropriate required courses and approval of the Department Chair.

LS 585 <LSSL 5385> Literature for Young Adults.
Acquaints students with the selection, critical analysis and historical developments of literature for young adults. Emphasis is placed on selecting recreational and informational materials for young adults that reflect our multicultural society; identifying techniques, activities and strategies that motivate young adults to read and respond to literature; and developing critical abilities for evaluating literature for young adults. Required for certification and MLS.

LS 591 <LSSL 5391> Internet for School Librarians.
Introduces the Internet and telecommunications for school librarians. Some of the topics covered include evaluation of Internet resources, various search tools, and a variety of communication tools. Explores ethical issues related to the responsible use information technology, and a wide variety of curriculum connections. Required for certification and MLS. Prerequisite: LS 570 <LSSL 5370> .

LS 593 <LSSL 5393> The Historical Development of Literature for Children.
Examines the historical development of a separate literature for children. Traces the history from the earliest books for children to current trends and issues in the field. Elective. Prerequisite: LS 560 <LSSL 5360> and 570 <5370>.

LS 596 <LSSL 5396> Computer Science Applications to Librarianship.
Examines the history and status of automated library services, including the international standards, hardware, and commercial software available to support cataloging, circulation, online catalogs, reference services, and administrative tasks. Required for MLS. Prerequisite: LS 570 <LSSL 5370>.


 

MANAGEMENT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MGT 530 <MGMT 5300> Foundations of Strategic Management This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of both Management and Strategic Management. Topics include the management functions of planning, organizing, leading, motivating, and controlling as well as SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis, strategy assessment and implementation, and strategy evaluation and control. This course does not apply to the 36-hour graduate credit hour requirement of the MBA degree program or the MS in Finance degree.

MGT 560 <MGMT 5315> Seminar in Operations Management The operations management function in a business enterprise has always been central to the activities of the organization. Achieving world-class competitiveness in either the manufacturing or service sectors demands that modern managers understand how to apply the fundamentals of operations management. Knowledge of these fundamentals will be developed through a combination of literature research and application in either case studies or actual consulting with local organizations.

< MGMT 5318> Quality Management.
This course provides students with the skills and knowledge needed to advance quality in their projects and organizations. This course covers current topics in quality management such as, total quality control, statistical quality control, statistical process control, quality circles, continuous improvement, definition and measurement of outcomes, and techniques to achieve increased quality of organizational activities. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Credit: 3.

MGT 561 <MGMT 5320> Management of Innovation and Technology.
A study of current topics in the management of creativity, innovation, technology, and quality assurance. Guest speakers and experiential exercises will be utilized in addition to lectures, student presentations, and class discussion of topics. The major project in the course will be the development of a technology forecast in a particular technology area through the use of the literature and contact with researchers and leaders in the selected field.

<MGMT 5323> Tools of Project Management.
This course provides students with the knowledge of and practice with project management tools. Included are tools and techniques for project planning and selection, project initiation and portfolio management, risk management, and implementation and closure. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Credit: 3.

MGT 562 <MGMT 5325> Project Management.
This course focuses on the planning, implementation, and control of projects.  Coverage will include project scope and definition, time and cost management, conflict resolution and team processes, resource allocation, scheduling and lifecycle management. Credit 3 hours.

MGT 563 <MGMT 5330> Operations Planning and Control.
This course covers operations planning and control systems in project, manufacturing and service environments.  Topics include resource control, resource planning, scheduling, capacity planning, operations planning and control software. Credit 3 hours.

<MGMT 5338> Project Management Capstone.
This course will allow students to evaluate the knowledge areas of project management as they apply to real world situations. This course takes a hands-on approach using a number of methodologies such as case studies, project audits, and class projects. Emphasis is placed on applying the concepts of project management to a variety of business disciplines. Prerequisites: MGT 562 <MGMT 5325>, MGT 563 <MGMT 5330>, <MGMT 5323>, and completion of 24 graduate credits. Credit: 3.

MGT 566 <MGMT 5345> Seminar in Team Leadership.
A systematic review, critique and application of findings of the behavioral sciences to the understanding, prediction and management of individual and group behavior in business organizations.

MGT 567 <MGMT 5390> Seminar in Strategic Management and Policy.
This capstone course is concerned with advanced principles and methods used in the strategic management of organizations. Thus, the primary focus is the evaluation of external environmental factors and internal organizational strengths and weaknesses for formulating strategies for organizations. Readings, simulation, and the case method are used to further develop the student’s executive knowledge, skills and abilities for future independent learning and success. Prerequisites: ACC 564 <Acct 5364>, BAN 568 <BANA 5368>, FIN 531 <FINC 5310>, GBA 587 <BUAD 5310>, and MKT 570 <MKGT 5330>.

MGT 568 <MGMT 5335> Services Management and Marketing.
This course examines the unique challenges of managing and marketing services. A review of the literature covering service theory and practical experience in designing and maintaining quality services are the foci of the course. Prerequisite: MKT 570.

MGT 571 <MGMT 5350> Leading Organizational Change and Development.
This course focuses on advanced theoretical concepts and applications in the areas of leadership, organizational development, and change management. Of particular importance are the concepts of organizational culture and leading organizational change initiatives. The application of specific tools for conducting organizational change initiatives will be explored.

MGT 573 <MGMT 5370> Social Responsibility of Business.
An in-depth study of the many dimensions of social responsibility in business which include the intellectual foundations supporting the economic, moral, and sociopolitical institutions of democratic capitalism. Case studies will be used to familiarize students with the literature in social responsibility, and students will be required to perform independent analyses of current events to understand the reasoning behind decisions on social responsibility in the workplace. A basic background in business disciplines is required Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

MGT 574 <MGMT 5355> Seminar in Human Resource Management.
This cornerstone human resource management seminar presents relevant background literature, fundamental principles, technical tools, and case studies to develop the student’s proficiency for future independent learning and research in the following areas of personnel: employee recruitment and selection, human resource development, labor relations, wage and salary administration, and employee services.

MGT 575 <MGMT 5380> Readings in Management.
This course is designed for directed study of individual students who wish intensive study in some specific area of Management. Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair and Graduate Coordinator.

MGT 576 <MGMT 5360> Staffing Organizations.
This course focuses on exploring advanced practices and processes involved in selecting and evaluating human resources in an organizational setting, as well as examining internal and external factors that influence the strategic nature and effectiveness of these practices.  In particular, human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment and selection methods, measurement, performance management, retention management, and the employment contract will be assessed as they pertain to staffing organizations.  Prerequisite: MGT 574.

MGT 578 <MGMT 5365> Seminar in Compensation Management.
This course focuses on advanced processes and methods for exploring compensation practices, developing compensation strategies, and managing compensation systems, in general.  In particular, job evaluation methods, pay structures, pay-for-performance plans, employee benefits, legal and global issues, and managing labor costs will be discussed and assessed.  Prerequisite: MGT 574.

MGT 595 <MGMT 5375> ERP Business Process Integration.
This course utilizes the SAP R/3 information system paradigm as a model for examination and development of integrated business process solutions. The course examines the conceptual background, rationale, methods, and procedures commonly employed by businesses in developing and configuring integrated business systems. The course provides practice and training through cases and hands-on experience using SAP R/3 by requiring students to configure business process solutions through integration of financial, controlling, production, materials management, sales and distribution, manufacturing, and other ERP process modules. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Thirty-six hours of business related courses of which twelve must be at the graduate level, completion of the MBA core courses and ACC 564 <ACCT 5304> or ACC 569, or permission of the instructor.


 

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MIS 575 <MGIS 5380> Readings in Management Information Systems.
This course is designed for directed study of individual students who wish intensive study in some specific area of Management Information Systems. Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair and Graduate Coordinator.

MIS 579 <MGIS 5360> Managing Business Systems Projects.
The courses examines the management of business system development and modification projects. It emphasizes the factors for effective communication and integration with users and user systems. It encourages interpersonal skill development with clients, users, team members, and others associated with development, operation and maintenance of the system. Adherence to methodological life cycle analysis and construction techniques are taught in the context of the creation of business-oriented systems. Students work individually and in teams to solve business problems.

MIS 588 <MGIS 5310> Seminar in Management Information Systems.
An in-depth study of business information systems. This course covers computer hardware, software, procedures, systems, and human resources and explores their integration and application in business. Topics include: end-user, computing and development, networking, and data collection and communication. The course content will be adaptive to stay current. The course content will be adaptive to stay current with individual research agendas.

MIS 590 <MGIS 5330> Business Applications of DBMS.
Business Applications of DBMS. Database management systems are at the heart of modern business information systems. They facilitate the sharing of data across the organization, and therefore support the notion that data is a corporate resource. Data management, which focuses on data collection, storage, and retrieval, thus constitutes a core activity for any organization. Students with appropriate backgrounds can work individually in specific areas of interest.

MIS 595 <MGIS 5375> ERP Business Process Integration.
This course utilizes the SAP R/3 information system paradigm as a model for examination and development of integrated business process solutions. The course examines the conceptual background, rationale, methods, and procedures commonly employed by businesses in developing and configuring integrated business systems. The course provides practice and training through cases and hands-on experience using SAP R/3 by requiring students to configure business process solutions through integration of financial, controlling, production, materials management, sales and distribution, manufacturing, and other ERP process modules. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Thirty-six hours of business related courses of which twelve must be at the graduate level, completion of the MBA core courses and ACC 564 <ACCT 5304> or ACC 569, or permission of the instructor.


 

MARKETING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MKT 568 <MKTG 5335> Services Management and Marketing.
This course examines the unique challenges of managing and marketing services. A review of the literature covering service theory and practical experience in designing and maintaining quality services are the foci of the course. Prerequisite: MKT 570

MKT 570 <MKTG 5330> Marketing Seminar.
This course focuses on formulating and implementing marketing management strategies and policies with special emphasis on the influence of marketing institutions, market structures, target market, segmentation, and the ability to manage marketing mix variables in a dynamic global environment. The course includes marketing decision making tools and the management of the elements of the marketing plan.

MKT 572 <MKTG 5350> Marketing Problems.
The course requires analysis of marketing problems related to marketing strategy and programs. Students engage in independent research into the business context and develop familiarity with leading edge marketing theory and practice to creatively solve problems.

MKT 575 <MKTG 5380> Reading In Marketing.
This course is designed for directed study of individual students who wish intensive study in some specific area of Marketing. Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair and Graduate Coordinator.


MASS COMMUNICATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MCOM 5300 Digital Media History and Theory.
This course outlines the history and theory of new media from aesthetic, reception, production, media effects, cultural, and political perspectives. Students will explore cross-disciplinary theoretical approaches and apply them to new media and their impact on cultural production. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program. Credit 3.

MCOM 5310 Critical Approaches to Media.
This course explores the growing body of critical and theoretical discourse defining the field of digital media studies. Students examine the major historical, cultural, sociopolitical, economic, structural, and philosophical trends in this field. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program. Credit 3.

MCOM 5320 Digital Media Law and Ethics.
This course examines ethical and legal concepts as they apply to various forms of electronic media expression, with special focus on digital media and Internet-based expression. Free speech, open records, privacy, libel, copyright and obscenity laws are reviewed in the context of the digital environment. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program. Credit 3.

MCOM 5330 Advanced Digital Writing.
This course enables students to develop competency in narrative techniques and information delivery for different genres, distribution platforms, and audiences. Emphasis is placed on digital media technologies and the demands of writing for video, social media, multimedia production, digital sound and live performance. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program. Credit 3.

MCOM 5340 Social Media.
This course is both theoretical and practical, drawing from the literature of social networks and community to explore online social media. Students learn how to develop strategies to effectively communicate and collaborate with their audience through current social media platforms. Emphasis is placed on the media professional's use and understanding of social media. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program. Credit 3.

MCOM 5350 Topics in Digital Media.
This research course offers special topics based upon new concepts developing in digital media. The specific research topic title appears in the Class Schedule and on student transcripts. Prerequisite: Department approval. Credit 3.

MCOM 5360 Mass Communication Theory.
This course addresses the history and development of mass communication theory. Theoretical approaches, models and application of theories are examined. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program. Credit 3.

MCOM 6300 Advanced Preproduction.
This course introduces students to advanced sound production, lighting, and other preproduction techniques combined with narrative storytelling using digital videography. Each student produces and formats high-quality videos for digital distribution, including high definition output and online streaming. Prerequisite: MCOM 5320. Credit 3.

MCOM 6310 Advanced Multimedia Production.
This course focuses on interactive multimedia production and narrative development for the web and other interactive media, using current authoring software. Students learn to create narratives using interactive design, content creation, authoring, scripting and publishing for the web. Special emphasis is placed on the development of long-form interactive stories Prerequisite: MCOM 5330 or department approval. Credit 3.

MCOM 6320 Documentary Scriptwriting.
This course takes a creative and systematic approach to transforming ideas into effective scripts for corporate, medical, religious, educational and governmental videos. Students learn and apply techniques for communicating visually, writing for the ear, using drama and humor, and applying documentary genre structures in various disciplines and for media platforms. Prerequisite: MCOM 5330. Credit 3.

MCOM 6330 Digital Editing.
Students study the creative and aesthetic qualities of editing film and video. Students learn to edit for both narrative and documentary styles including computer-generated imagery, sound design, color correction, mood and rhythm. Prerequisite: Department approval. Credit 3.

MCOM 6340 Digital Entrepreneurship.
This course examines how new media tools are used to create commercial opportunities and assist in the dissemination of information in both digital and traditional media outlets. Students will explore and apply entrepreneurial principles to create new media business ventures. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program. Credit 3.

MCOM 6350 Narrative Scriptwriting.
This course addresses the art and craft of narrative scriptwriting for digital media. Students develop narratives through the creation and building of characters and using dramatic principles such as scene setting, plotting, sequencing Prerequisite: MCOM 5330. Credit 3.

MCOM 6360 Mass Communication Research Methods.
This course integrates an understanding and application of research methods to develop the ability to produce research in an academic environment and in the profession associated with mass communication fields. Students use and understand the processes and interpret the statistics that bring rigorous data to the research process. Students design, administer and critically evaluate a personal behavioral research project. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Credit 3.

MCOM 6373 Digital Video Production.
This course emphasizes advanced applications of digital editing and visual storytelling. Through the creation and production of programming for Cable Channel 7, experienced student digital filmmakers increase aesthetic and technical proficiency in advanced video camera operation, lighting, and video editing methods. Prerequisite: Department approval. Credit 3.

MCOM 6098 Thesis.
Students work under faculty supervision to produce a scholarly thesis of original work about digital media approved by all members of the student's thesis committee Prerequisite: Approval of committee chair. Credit 3.

MCOM 6099 Thesis Project.
Students work under faculty supervision to produce a thesis project of original work in digital media approved by all members of the student's thesis committee. Prerequisite: Approval of committee chair. Credit 3.


 

MATHEMATICS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MTH 560 <MATH 5360> Special Topics.
Topics and courses are selected to suit individual needs of students. Methods of independent study and research are stressed. The course may be repeated for additional credit. Prerequisite: Consent of program coordinator. Credit 3.

MTH 561 <MATH 5361> Theory and Applications of Probability.
Topics include probability axioms and properties, conditional probability, random variables, probability distributions, moment generating functions, laws of large numbers, and the Central Limit Theorem. Also listed as STA 561. Prerequisite: STA 472 (or equivalent) or consent of the instructor. Credit 3.

MTH 570 <MATH 5370> Fourier Analysis and Applications.
This course is a study of applied harmonic analysis. Topics include Fourier analysis, wavelet analysis, and applications of these topics. Prerequisite: MTH 466 or MTH 588 <MATH 5388> or the consent of the instructor. Credit 3.

MTH 580 <MATH 5380> Research Project in Mathematics Education.
In this course, the student will develop a project based on one of the core areas (Algebra, Geometry, Analysis, or Probability and Statistics) appropriate for use in teaching.  This course is a capstone for candidates pursuing the degree of MA of Mathematics.  Prerequisites: MTH 586, MTH 587, MTH 588, MTH 589. Credit 3.

MTH 581 <MATH 5381> Algebra: Structure and Applications.
This course includes the study of algebraic structures (such as groups, rings, integral domains, and fields) and their properties, and activities and concepts related to the algebra of real numbers that are applicable to middle school teachers.  The course is designed for in-service middle school mathematics teachers. Credit 3.

MTH 583 <MATH 5383> Seminar in Geometry and Measurement for Elementary Teachers.
This course will include a study of congruency, similarity, transformations, coordinate geometry, and measurement. It is specifically designed for elementary school teachers with a mathematics specialization who wish to obtain the master’s degree in elementary education with a minor in mathematics. Prerequisites: Elementary school mathematics certification and MTH 383 or equivalent. Credit 3.

MTH 584 <MATH 5384> Seminar in Mathematical Systems for Elementary Teachers.
This course will include a study of the development of the natural number system, the development of the integers, the development of the rational number system, and the development of the real number system. It is specifically designed for elementary school teachers with a mathematics specialization who wish to obtain the master’s degree in elementary education with a minor in mathematics. Prerequisites: Elementary school mathematics certification and MTH 384 or equivalent. Credit 3.

MTH 585 <MATH 5385> Mathematics seminar for Junior High School Teachers.
This course includes topics from arithmetic, algebra, geometry, number theory and other mathematical areas at a level appropriate for junior high school teachers. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Credit 3.

MTH 586 <MATH 5386> Seminar in Algebra For Teachers.
This course consists of a survey of several abstract algebraic systems including groups, rings, integral domains, and fields. Prerequisite: Certification in secondary school mathematics and MTH 377 or equivalent. Credit 3.

MTH 587 <MATH 5387> Seminar in Geometry For Teachers.
This course is a study of topics in geometry including constructions and transformations. Prerequisite: Certification in secondary school mathematics and MTH 363 or equivalent. Credit 3.

MTH 588 <MATH 5388> Seminar in Analysis For Teachers.
This course includes topics from set theory, number systems, functions, real sequences, limits, continuity, differentiation and integration. Prerequisite: Certification in secondary school mathematics and MTH 143 or equivalent. Credit 3.

MTH 589 <MATH 5389> Seminar in Probability and Statistics For Teachers.
This course includes topics from probability theory, distribution functions, descriptive statistics, and inferential statistics. Prerequisite: Certification in secondary school mathematics and MTH 379 or equivalent. Credit 3.

MTH 595 <MATH 5395> Digital Image Processing.
The emphasis of this course is on the analysis of digital image processing algorithms used for solving problems in areas such as image enhancement and restoration, image registration, pattern recognition, and image segmentation. Prerequisite: MTH 377 and programming experience. Credit: 3 hours

MTH 596 <MATH 5396> Optimization.
The emphasis of this course is on modern algorithms and computational methods needed for solving optimization problems. Applications to current industrial problems will be given, and the theory of operations research will be developed. Prerequisite: MTH 377 and MTH 244, or consent of instructor. Credit: 3 hours

MTH 597 <MATH 5397> Discrete Mathematics.
Discrete structures are emphasized in this course, which includes a study of combinatorics, graph theory, and number theory. The applications of these structures in computers and communications will be highlighted. Prerequisites: MTH 477 or MTH 586 <MATH 5386> or equivalent. Credit: 3 hours

MTH 632 <MATH 6332> Introduction To Topology.
This course is a rigorous introduction to point set topology. Topics include continuity, connectedness, compactness, metrization theorems, separation theorems, and the Tychonoff theorem. Prerequisites: MTH 364 or equivalent. Credit: 3 hours

MTH 633 <MATH 6333> Foundations of Analysis I.
This course is the first half of the analysis sequence.  The analysis sequence includes topics from advanced multivariate calculus, normed linear spaces, measure theory, including Lebesgue and Borel measures, measurable functions, Lebesgue integration, and spaces of integrable functions.  Prerequisites:  MTH 461 and MTH 466, equivalent, or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

MTH 634 <MATH 6334> Foundations of Analysis II.
This course is the second half of the analysis sequence.  The analysis sequence includes topics from advanced multivariate calculus, normed linear spaces, measure theory, including Lebesgue and Borel measures, measurable functions, Lebesgue integration, and spaces of integrable functions.  Prerequisites: MTH 633 <MATH 6333> or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

*MTH 635 <MATH 6335> Algebra I.
This course is in the first half of the algebra sequence.  The algebra sequence will include Group and Ring theory.  Special topics include groups, group actions, the Sylow Theorems, rings, modules, fields, field extensions, and an introduction to Galois Theory.  Prerequisites: MTH 477 or equivalent. Credit 3.

*MTH 636 <MATH 6336> Algebra II.
This course is the second half of the algebra sequence.  The algebra sequence will include Group and Ring theory.  Specific topics include groups, group actions, the Sylow Theorems, rings, modules, fields, field extensions, and an introduction to Galois Theory.  Prerequisites: MTH 631 (Algebra I) or equivalent. Credit 3.

MTH 668 <MATH 6368> Numerical Linear Algebra.
This course is a study of vector spaces and matrices. Topics include solving linear systems, least square methods, eigenvalue and eigenvector theory, and applications of these topics. Prerequisite: MTH 377 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

MTH 673 <MATH 6373> Applied Analysis.
This course studies properties of normed spaces and functions defined on normed spaces. Special emphasis is placed on Euclidean n-space. Topics include limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration. Prerequisite: MTH 466 or MTH 588 <MATH 5388> or consent of the instructor. Credit 3.

MTH 677 <MATH 6377> Abstract Algebra.
Algebraic structure is emphasized in this course, which includes a study of groups, rings, fields, and their applications in coding theory and cryptography. Prerequisite: MTH 477 or MTH 586 <MATH 5386> or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

MTH 679 <MATH 6379> Functions of a Complex Variable.
Included in this course are studies of the complex number system, analytic functions, integration theory and the calculus of residues. Additional topics of special interest to the class may be included. Prerequisite: MTH 244 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

MTH 694 <MATH 6394> Scientific Computation.
Topics include solutions of equations, approximation and interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, the fast Fourier transform, and numerical simulation. Also listed as CS 694 <COSC 6321>. Prerequisites: MTH 244 and some programming experience, or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

MTH 698 <MATH 6398> Research and Thesis. Credit 3.

MTH 699 <MATH 6399> Research and Thesis. Credit 3.


 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

PADM 5381 <PA 581> Dynamics of Public Administration.
Examines the history and theoretical basis of public administration and the basic issues that confront it, including administrative responsibility and ethics, and the formulation and implementation of public policy. Students not enrolled in the Master of Public Administration program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

PADM 5383 <PA 583> Program Evaluation.
Examines techniques for the collection, manipulation, interpretation, and presentation of data and information in public policy/management processes, and demonstrates application of the techniques using computer technology. The course covers the relevant literature and engages students in appropriate research and/or professional practice. Students not enrolled in the Master of Public Administration program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course.  Credit 3.

PADM 5384 <PA 584> Organizational Theory and Behavior.
This course covers the major topics, issues, and contributions in the literature on organizations, their structures and functions, and the behavior of people in them, with emphasis on applications to government and nonprofit organizations. Examples and exercises refer to organizations at federal, state, and local levels of government and to a variety of nonprofit organizations, such as hospitals, social service agencies, and faith-based/non-governmental organizations. Students not enrolled in the Master of Public Administration program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

PADM 5386 <PA 586> Leadership and Human Resource Management.
This course provides an understanding of the evolution and context of the public service. The reasons for merit and its unique political and management problems are addressed. Specific topics include: human resources planning, recruitment and selection, performance evaluation, compensation, promotion and benefits, staff development, labor relations, discipline, and control structures. Students not enrolled in the Master of Public Administration program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

PADM 5387 <PA 587> Budgeting and Finance
Examination of the public budgetary process and related financial management techniques. Students not enrolled in the Master of Public Administration program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

PADM 5388 <PA 588> Ethics in Government.
This course provides a review of classical and contemporary literature on the role and practice of ethics in public administration. Contemporary empirical research, case studies, and ethical problem solving are also addressed. A primary theme of the course will be fostering and applying “right action” and “good conduct” in public organizations and public policy making. Students not enrolled in the Master of Public Administration program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

PADM 5389 Public Management
This course examines current public management techniques and theories with a specific focus on organizations in the public and nonprofit sectors. The course prepares students to evaluate current management approaches in the public and nonprofit sectors with a specific focus on application of the approaches in the field. Topics will include theories related to the field of public management, the political context of public management, contracting out, networking, strategic management and planning, performance management, and public participation. Students not enrolled in the Master of Public Administration program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in the course.  Credit 3. 

PADM 5395 <PA 595> Internship and Work Experience in Public Services.
This course is useful for students who desire substantive work experience in a governmental or nongovernmental organization. This course will allow MPA students to take a 6 hour, 12 month internship. The internship is required for the MPA degree and fulfils a requirement by its accrediting agency NASPAA, the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. Enrollment is by permission of the Director of Graduate Studies. Students not enrolled in the Master of Public Administration program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 1-3.

 


 

POLITICAL SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

POLS 5330 <POL 530> American Politics
This course offers an overview of the scholarship in the fields of American national political institutions, and political behavior. The course explores Congress, the Presidency, the Judiciary, political ideology, attitudes and beliefs, public opinion, voting behavior, political parties, interest groups, and mass movements. The course covers classics in the literature of the sub-fields as well as current research questions and controversies. Students will engage in research and writing. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.  

POLS 5338 <POL 538> Victims' Politics and Policies.
The course explores the political environment in which victims' rights policies are formulated. The course offers future victim service providers a framework for understanding how political institutions and policies affect victim services provision. The course will lead to knowledge of the appropriate literature and student engagement in research or professional practice. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

POLS 5360 <POL 560> Seminar in America Politics.
The course covers the relevant literature and engages students in appropriate research. The course may be repeated for credit when the announced topics vary. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

POLS 5362 <POL 562> Seminar in Political Theory.
The course covers the relevant literature and engages students in appropriate research. The course may be repeated for credit when the announced topics vary. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

POLS 5367 <POL 567> Seminar in International Relations.
The course covers the relevant literature and engages students in appropriate research. The course may be repeated for credit when the announced topics vary. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

POLS 5371 <POL 571> Comparative Politics
A comprehensive overview of the theories, concepts, and methods of comparative analysis. The techniques of comparing political systems are examined, as are the major concepts of comparative politics, such as political elites, institutions, public policy, development and modernization, elections and political behavior, mass movements, and revolution and political violence. The course covers the relevant literature and engages students in appropriate research. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

POLS 5372 <POL 572> Seminar in Comparative Politics.
The seminar will focus on such topics as political development, sustainability, comparative institutions, comparative public policy, transitions to democracy, and opinions and behavior. The seminar may also focus on one or more regions or individual countries. The course covers the relevant literature and engages students in appropriate research. The course may be repeated for credit when the announced topics differ. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

POLS 5373 <POL 573> International Relations.
This study places emphasis on the attempts to construct a general theory of international relations and the evolution of international relations methodology. Attention is also given to such techniques as systems analysis, decision-making, conflict resolution, and field theory. The course covers the relevant literature and engages students in appropriate research. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course.  Credit 3.

POLS 5377 <POL 577> The Scope and Methods of Political Science.
This is a study of the discipline of modern political science and an inquiry into the literature, scope, and techniques of research with particular emphasis upon the mathematical and quantitative methods of empirical research. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

POLS 5378 <POL 578> Problems and Internships in Political Science.
This course is designed for topics in which the subject cuts across two or more areas of concentration. The course may be taken on an individual basis with the permission of the Political Science Department Chair. The course covers the relevant literature and engages students in appropriate research and/or professional practice. May be repeated when topic varies. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course.  Credit 3.

POLS 5379 <POL 579> Workshop: Teaching Political Science.
Developed specifically for public school teachers, the course will offer a variety of topics useful to classroom teaching. Topics will vary according to need and the instructor but may include Texas politics, constitutional issues, current elections, and using technology in the class classroom. The course covers the relevant literature and engages students in appropriate research and/or professional practice. The course may be repeated for credit when the announced topics differ. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

POLS 5382 <POL 582> Seminar in Public Administration.
The course covers the relevant literature and engages students in appropriate research. The course may be repeated for credit when the announced topics vary. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

POLS 5385 <POL 585> Public Policy.
This course involves the consideration of the process of public policy formulation, governmental planning, and administrative decision-making. Attention is given to the public administrator as a policy-maker and as one responsible for policy implementation. The course covers the relevant literature and engages students in appropriate research. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.

POLS 5395 <POL 595> Internship and Work Experience in Public Services.
This course is useful for students who desire substantive work experience in a governmental or non-governmental organization. This course will allow students to take a 6 hour, 12 month internship. The internship is required for the MPA degree and fulfils a requirement by its accrediting agency NASPAA, the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. Enrollment is by permission of the Director of Graduate Studies. The course engages students in appropriate professional practice. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 1-3.

POLS 6398 <POL 698> Thesis.
Students will make use of appropriate literature and research techniques in the development of the thesis. Credit 3.

POLS 6399 <POL 699> Thesis.
Students will make use of appropriate literature and research techniques in the development of the thesis. Credit 3.

POLS 7330 <POL 730> Public Policy and the School District.
Examines school districts as systems of governance in American communities and the problems associated with governance, with particular emphasis upon educational issues. Topics may include democratic theory, local political systems, intergovernmental relations, relationships with citizens, and political accountability. The course covers the relevant literature and engages students in appropriate research. Students not enrolled in the Master of Political Science program must obtain the Department of Political Science Graduate Director's permission to enroll in this course. Credit 3.


 

PSYCHOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

PSY 530 <PSYC 5330> Psychopathology.
This course examines psychological disorders and involves review, critical evaluation, and integration of current scientific literature regarding diagnosis, phenomenology, and etiology. Issues in the application of the multiaxial diagnostic system in clinical practice are discussed.

PSY 531 <PSYC 5331> Graduate Seminar in General Psychology.
This course surveys the science of psychology, providing an advanced synthesis of the scientific study of human behavior that includes the biological, perceptual, developmental, and social determinants of behavior, emotion, and cognition,.

PSY 532 <PSYC 5332> Advanced Social Psychology.
This course examines social factors that influence individual behavior. Integrative theoretical perspectives and emerging programs of research within the discipline are given specific consideration. Readings include a variety of original sources.

PSY 533 <PSYC 5333> Theory and Research in Psychotherapy I.
This course is a comparative analysis of different systems and techniques of psychotherapy. The role of therapist, client, and setting are examined along with ethical principles.

PSY 534 <PSYC 5334> Theory and Research in Psychotherapy II.
This course examines in detail selected advanced systems or techniques of psychotherapy, including group therapy, marital and family therapy, therapy for sexual dysfunction, or others. Content may vary from semester to semester.

PSY 535 <PSYC 5335> Special Problems in Psychology.
This course allows for in-depth study in individually selected topics not specifically included in the formal course offerings. Prerequisite: Consent of department chair and instructor.

PSY 536 <PSYC 5336> Advanced Cognitive Psychology.
This seminar-style course examines the major psychological issues related to cognition. Topics covered include attentional processes, memory, language, knowledge representations, decision making, problem solving, and cognitive neuroscience. By combining reading assignments in the textbook and current research articles, in-class discussions explore the relationship between empirical evidence and theoretical explanations of cognitive processes. This course includes a specific focus on the practical applications of cognitive theories and research..

PSY 538 <PSYC 5338> Consultation in School Psychology.
Various methods and techniques of consultation in schools are examined and applied. Best practices according to the National Association of School Psychologists provide the basis for the curriculum. The course has both didactic and field experience components.

PSY 539 <PSYC 5339> Advanced School Psychology.
This course is designed to acquaint the student with history, theory, delivery models and techniques underlying the practice of school psychology. Various historical and contemporary roles of the school psychologist are examined in addition to a thorough examination of all applicable federal and state laws. There is also a field experience aspect to the course.

PSY 560 <PSYC 5360> Advanced Physiological Psychology.
This course examines the biological substrates of behavior. Particular attention is given to the effects of psychoactive chemicals..

PSY 561 <PSYC 5361> Neuropsychopharmacology.
This course examines the field of behavioral pharmacology: the systematic study of the effects of drugs on behavior and the way in which behavioral principles can help in understanding how drugs work. The focus is on the neurophysiological mechanisms of action of various psychoactive drugs and on the various neurotransmitter systems within the nervous system. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PSY 581 <PSYC 5381> Advanced Learning Theory.
This course examines processes of learning through a critical discussion of current research and theory in the areas of classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and social and cognitive influences in learning

PSY 582 <PSYC 5382> Advanced Industrial/Organizational Psychology I.
This course provides an integration of psychological principles as applied to industrial/organizational milieu. The focus is on the application of research methodology, psychological assessment, and personality theories to the work environment.

PSY 583 <PSYC 5383> Advanced Industrial/Organizational Psychology II.
This course provides an integration of psychological principles as applied to organizational environments. The focus is on the application of research methodology, psychological assessment, and social psychological theory to leadership, employee satisfaction and motivation, behavioral analysis and conflict resolution, and intervention in work related stress.

PSY 585 <PSYC 5385> Advanced Health Psychology.
This course explores in depth the theoretical and conceptual foundations of health psychology, the interactions of biological, psychological, and social factors in health, health promotion and prevention, stress and coping with disease and illness, and recovery and rehabilitation to acute, chronic, and terminal illness, including a variety of specific assessment and intervention strategies. A review of the literature and independent research is expected.

PSY 587 <PSYC 5387> Advanced Statistics.
This course is an advanced study of the use of statistical methods as tools for inferential hypothesis testing. It includes consideration of data screening, effect sizes, and simple effects tests. It also provides an introduction to multiple regression. Prerequisite: PSY 387 or equivalent.

PSY 588 <PSYC 5388> Introduction to Experimental Design.
This course teaches students skills that will allow them to design their own scholarly research projects. Students are encouraged to understand that research design often requires finding the right balance between advantages and disadvantages of specific methods. Students will become familiar with the current scholarly literature regarding research design and will write an independent research proposal that can serve as a thesis or dissertation proposal.

PSY 592 <PSYC 5392> History and Systems of Psychology.
This course examines the philosophical, theoretical, and paradigmatic antecedents of modern psychology. Important early publications, central figures, and major university centers are studied in detail, and students explore and critique the assumptions that inform influential perspectives within psychology today.

PSY 594 <PSYC 5394> Psychometrics.
This course covers principles of psychometric theory and applications, including reliability, validity, and test construction. The course emphasizes tests and scales that measure personality and mental health. Limited practicum is required.

PSY 595 <PSYC 5395> Assessment of Intelligence and Achievement.
The course provides supervised instruction and practice in the administration, scoring, interpretation, and reporting of results of the Wechsler Scales and other measures of intelligence, achievement, adaptive behavior, and personality to produce integrated reports. Prerequisites: PSY 594 <PSYC 5394> or equivalent.

PSY 596 <PSYC 5396> Assessment of Personality and Psychopathology.
This course provides supervised instruction in the theory, administration, scoring, and interpretation of personality assessment instruments. Two separate sections of this course are offered, one focusing on objective measures (e.g., MMPI-2, PAI) and one focusing on projective measures (e.g., Rorschach).

PSY 597 <PSYC 5397> Advanced Developmental Psychology.
The course provides an advanced study of growth and development processes throughout the life cycle. Theories and applications of basic research are both examined in detail, and students are expected to delve into one of the major topics--such as multicultural aspects of development, cognitive development, social-emotional factors, and physical development--in depth through critical reading of original research.

PSY 598 <PSYC 5398> Advanced Child Assessment.
Students will gain in-depth practical experience in the comprehensive assessment of infants, children, and adolescents. A variety of individual testing instruments will be reviewed, including those used to evaluate cognitive, social-emotional, behavioral and executive functioning. Alternative methods of assessment, such as transdisciplinary play-based assessment, dynamic assessment, and curriculum-based measurement, as well as techniques and instruments specifically designed for the evaluation of Autism and other disabled populations, will be emphasized.

PSY 671 <PSYC 6371> Master's Internship in Psychology.
This course is designed to be the culmination of the master's level training in applied psychology. Students will be required to demonstrate their ability to integrate and apply their knowledge.

PSY 691 <PSYC 6391> Practicum I.
The practicum experience is designed to provide the graduate student with an opportunity to develop interviewing skills, provide an introduction to psychotherapy, and bring together theory and practice as a developing psychologist. The first practicum course begins with the assumption that the student has had little to no experience in this domain. Ethical issues related to clinical practice are thoroughly explored.

PSY 692 <PSYC 6392> Practicum II.
The practicum experience provides students with an opportunity to bring theory and practice together to develop their psychotherapy skills. Students are assigned to practicum sites where they provide therapy to clients with various psychological disorders and problems in living. Ethical issues in treatment are also covered.

PSY 693 <PSYC 6393> Practicum III.
The practicum experience provides students with an opportunity to bring theory and practice together to develop their psychotherapy skills. Students are assigned to practicum sites where they provide therapy to clients with various psychological disorders and problems in living. Ethical issues in treatment are also covered.

PSY 694 <PSYC 6394> Practicum in Psychometrics.
This concluding practicum experience is designed to provide the graduate student with an opportunity to further develop and apply skills in administration, scoring, interpreting, and reporting of psychological tests. This practicum is to be taken near the end of a student's educational program, with supervised experience intended to prepare the student for the psychological assessment and diagnostic aspects of internship or initial employment. Prerequisite: PSY 594 <PSYC 5394> and PSY 595 <PSYC 5396>.

PSY 696 <PSYC 6396> Practicum in School Psychology I.
This course provides students with the theoretical foundation necessary to design and implement intervention programs to promote mental health wellness and resiliency. Students gain direct field experience with the provision of psychological counseling used to assist children. Ethical issues related to intervention and prevention services are explored in depth. Prerequisite: PSY 539 <PSYC 5339>. Credit 3.


PSY 697 <PSYC 6397> Practicum in School Psychology II.
As the culminating specialist-level, field-based experience this course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to bring theory and practice together to continue developing those skills required in practice. Students are assigned to school-based practicum sites where they provide a variety of services (e.g., assessment, intervention) under the supervision of both field and university supervisors. Prerequisite: PSY 696 <PSYC 6396>. Credit 3.

PSY 698 <PSYC 6398> Thesis I.
This first phase of the Thesis includes a review of the literature, research design, collection of pilot data, and related steps. Students are required to present and defend a research proposal.

PSY 699 <PSYC 6399> Thesis II.
The second phase of the Thesis includes data collection, manuscript preparation, and a final defense of the Thesis.

PSY 730 <PSYC 7330> Clinical Psychology Proseminar.
This course introduces students to the field of clinical psychology, to current topics in clinical psychology, and the areas in which clinical psychologists practice and conduct research. The students are also introduced to the research programs and clinical interests of the core faculty in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Program. As part of the course, students are expected to begin scholarly work with a faculty member of their choice.

PSY 733 <PSYC 7333> Law and Social Psychology.
This course applies social psychological theory and research to the legal system. Critical examination of contentious topics such as recovered memories, false confessions, eyewitness adequacy, and death qualification is undertaken through careful study of a wide variety of original sources. The influence of social class in legal settings Is also considered.

PSY 735 <PSYC 7335> Law and Psychology.
This course explores historical and contemporary applications of the social sciences to the law. Special emphasis is placed on the use of information derived from the science and profession of psychology to shape judicial, legislative, and administrative law.

PSY 736 <PSYC 7336> Mental Health Law.
This course explores state and federal constitutional, statutory, and case law regulating mental health professional practice. Topics include: child abuse/neglect reporting laws, civil commitment, confidentiality and privilege, duty to protect third parties from harm, psychiatric hospitalization of inmates, and state licensing requirements.

PSY 739 <PSYC 7339> Developmental Psychopathology.
This course examines psychological disorders among children and adolescents, as understood through current empirical literature. Drawing from developmental psychology and general systems theory, the course emphasizes the ways in which biological, social, and psychological processes interact in the development of--or resistance to--psychopathology. The course is designed to help students appropriately consider the contextual and developmental influences on child psychopathology when the students review or conduct research. The course also helps clinicians-in-training thoroughly consider developmental and contextual factors when assessing and diagnosing childhood psychopathology.

PSY 760 <PSYC 7360> Multicultural Psychology.
This course examines the theoretical and methodological foundations of multicultural psychology. Students review and critique current research in the field and discuss applications of the course content to their practicum training and placements.

PSY 762 <PSYC 7362> Ethics in Clinical Practice.
This course studies the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct as well as various specialty guidelines and recommendations and their applications to practice, research, and consultation. The literature on ethics is critically examined and readings include a variety of original sources. Students examine case material that features ethical conflicts and controversies, and students practice processes to resolve ethical dilemmas.

PSY 770 <PSYC 7370> Empirically Supported Treatments.
This course examines the psychosocial treatments for specific psychological disorders (e.g., depression, panic disorder) that have received substantial empirical support. The course also examines the methodological, practical, and political controversies surrounding the empirically supported treatment movement. All students are required to use at least one EST with a practicum client while enrolled in this course.

PSY 774 <PSYC 7374> Human Neuropsychology.
This course examines brain-behavior relationships, including higher cortical functions. Specific consideration is given to the most common neurobehavioral syndromes likely to be confronted in clinical practice, administration of tests that are used to assess neuropsychological functioning, coverage of critical issues in differential diagnoses involving neuropsychological functioning, intervention implications, and scholarly research in clinical neuropsychology.

PSY 777 <PSYC 7377> Emotions.
This course examines the intersection of affective and cognitive bases of behavior.  It debates the nature of emotion, delineates its components, and examines the roles of emotion in self-control, cognition, well-being, psychopathology, and relationships.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing.  Credit: 3.

PSY 787 <PSYC 7387> Multivariate Statistics in Psychology.
This course examines the use of multivariate procedures in psychological research. Students use SPSS to conduct regression, MANOVA, discriminant analysis, and factor analyses on psychological data. Additional advanced procedures are reviewed.

PSY 792 <PSYC 7392> Topics in Clinical Psychology.
This course will vary in content depending on the interests of faculty and students. Students will study in-depth selected topics in clinical psychology.

PSY 860 <PSYC 8360> Forensic Assessment I.
This course examines issues related to conducting assessments for the criminal courts. Students review and critique current research in forensic psychology, as well as developing case law. Emphasis is placed on constructing the written report and on the ethical issues often faced in the forensic forum. This course will include a practicum component in which students perform forensic assessments with the instructor.

PSY 861 <PSYC 8361> Forensic Assessment II.
In this course students continue to develop skills in forensic assessment with an emphasis on the civil case Issues (e.g., juvenile evaluations, personal injury, and child custody). Current research in forensic psychology, as well as developing case law, are reviewed. Providing expert testimony in the courtroom will be discussed in detail, and students are required to participate as witnesses defending a case they have completed in a mock trial exercise. Prerequisite: PSY 860 <PSYC 8360>

PSY 881 <PSYC 8381> Introduction to Doctoral Practicum.
The course requires treatment observation under a peer supervisor. Students acquire skills in interviewing, mental status examination, suicide assessment, psychological diagnosis, and treatment planning. Ethical and multicultural issues will be explored in depth. Prerequisite: PSY 530 <PSYC 5330>. Credit 3.

PSY 882 <PSYC 8382> Doctoral Practicum I.

In this practicum, students are assigned to the Psychological Services Center opertaed by program faculty or a related practicum site.  Students attend a group supervision session emphasizing either psychological assessment and integrative report writing or psychotherapy.  Students have practicum experiencees that allow them to practice assessments or therapy skills under supervision from a licensed psychologist. 

PSY 883 <PSYC 8383> Doctoral Clinical Practicum II.
In this practicum, students who have completed PSY 882 <PSYC 8362> are eligible to engage in clinical work either at the Psychological Services Center or at various off-campus clinical practicum sites. Students will continue to enroll in this course for a total of at least 3 semesters (minimum 9 credit hours). Students may register for between 1 and 3 course credits. Prerequisite: PSY 882.

PSY 890 <PSYC 8390> Internship I.
Placement in an applied clinical setting for a full year (e.g., September - August) under the supervision of a licensed psychologist. APA-approved sites are preferred. Prerequisites: PSY 882, PSY 883, and consent of Clinical Training Committee.

PSY 891 <PSYC 8391> Internship II.
Placement in an applied clinical setting for a full year (e.g., September - August) under the supervision of a licensed psychologist. APA-approved sites are preferred. Prerequisites: PSY 890 <PSYC 8390> and consent of Clinical Training Committee.

PSY 892 <PSYC 8392> Internship III.
Placement in an applied clinical setting for a full year (e.g., September - August) and under the supervision of a licensed psychologist. APA-approved sites are preferred. Prerequisites: PSY 891 <PSYC 8391> and consent of Clinical Training Committee.

PSY 896 <PSYC 8396> Dissertation.

PSY 897 <PSYC 8397> Dissertation.

PSY 898 <PSYC 8398> Dissertation.

PSY 899 <PSYC 8399> Dissertation.

 


 

READING/LANGUAGE ARTS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

RDG 530 <READ 5306> Survey of Reading.
This course provides historical and philosophical perspectives in literacy instruction. The results of research in such areas as emergent literacy, cueing systems and comprehension, reading interests, current literacy methodologies, and diversity of learners in schools are examined for application in classroom practice.

RDG 532 <READ 5307> Practicum in Literacy Assessment and Instructional Strategies I.
This course provides an opportunity for an in-depth study of current approaches to assessment as a foundation for literacy instruction. In supervised experiences teachers will learn how to use a range of formal and informal assessment tools and methods to diagnose and assess reading and writing development, to guide instruction, and to involve the learner in self-assessment. Prerequisite: RDG 530

RDG 533 <READ 5308> Practicum in Literacy Assessment and Instructional Strategies II.
This course offers an in-depth study of the assessment of struggling readers and writers. In supervised settings teachers will use various formal and informal individual assessment procedures and instruments. These assessments will direct instructional strategies and methodology. Candidates develop individual case studies. Prerequisites: RDG 532

RDG 534 <READ 5309> Literacy Instruction in Grades EC-4.
Candidates explore research-based instructional practices in emergent literacy, cueing systems and comprehension, reading interests, current literacy methodologies, and diversity of learners in schools. This course is designed for graduate students admitted to an authorized initial alternative teaching certification program. This course does not count toward the reading master’s degree program.

RDG 535 <READ 5310> Literacy Instruction in Grades 4-8.
This course explores research-based instructional practice in middle school, word analysis skills, current literacy methodologies, and diversity of learners in schools. This course is designed for graduate students admitted to an authorized initial alternative teaching certification program. This course does not count toward the reading master’s degree program.

RDG 536 <READ 5311> Literacy and Learning Grades 8-12.
This course is for prospective and practicing teachers and focuses on he literacy strategies that enable 8-12 students to comprehend, engage, and make use of the more challenging content and texts in all 8-12 subject areas. Candidates will be involved in class lectures, discussion, small group activities, written assignments, oral presentations, and tests. 3 credit hours.

RDG 561 <READ 5315> Language Arts: Theory and Instruction.
This course provides theories and practices for teaching oral and written English, integrating the processes of reading, writing, listening, and speaking in classrooms, and the integration of language arts across the curriculum.

RDG 587 <READ 5320> Workshop in Reading.
This course will provide the opportunity for relevant and timely workshops and independent research and study.

RDG 589 <READ 5325> Improvement of Literacy in Secondary Schools and Adult Populations.
This course is designed to prepare secondary classroom teachers and reading specialists for teaching reading to secondary school and adult populations. Content includes characteristics of secondary students and adult learners, language patterns and structures common to various subject-area texts and techniques to teach reading and study strategies in secondary and adult classrooms.

RDG 590 <READ 5330> Literature and Instructional Materials in Reading Programs.
This course prepares specialized reading professionals to teach classic and contemporary children’s and young adult’s literature and easy reading fiction and nonfiction at all levels. Theories and practices that stimulate student interest in reading, promote reading growth, foster appreciation for the written word and increase the motivation of learners to read widely and independently for information, pleasure, and personal growth are emphasized.

RDG 598 <READ 5335> Cognition and Emergent Literacy.
This course provides an opportunity to examine language, cognition, and pre-reading skills of young children. It enables the student to understand, develop, and evaluate language and reading programs for young children.

RDG 638 <READ 6305> Research in Language and Literacy.
This course is designed to present current theories and research regarding aspects of literacy and oral and written language. This knowledge is related to instructional applications for classrooms for the literacy development of children and students. Prerequisite: RDG 530 <READ 5306> or consent of the instructor.

RDG 675 <READ 6310> The Administration and Supervision of Literacy Programs.
This course examines the organization, development, implementation and improvement of reading and writing programs in public schools grade K through 12 at classroom, building and district levels. Prerequisite: RDG 530 <READ 5306> or consent of instructor.

RDG 688 <READ 6315> The Politics of Literacy.
This course will examine the connections among the psychological, sociological, cultural, and political aspects of literacy learning and teaching. Students will develop their own research, community service and/or professional exploration projects, present works-in-progress, and set goals for further development. Prerequisites: RDG 588, RDG 589, and BSL 571.

RDG 690 <READ 6320> Internship in Reading Supervision.
This course provides a field internship for Reading Specialist candidates that focuses on reading and writing curriculum and instructional development, professional development of literacy teachers, and leadership in literacy assessment at the school and district levels. The internship provides students opportunities to apply the theories and principles of learning throughout the reading masters program. Candidates must be enrolled in their final semester of coursework for the reading masters degree; the candidate’s portfolio will be developed as part of this capstone course.

RDG 710 <READ 7100> Seminar in Literacy Leadership.
Individual seminar topics will be presented monthly and will change for each semester in which candidates are enrolled. Topics will cover a wide variety of issues of interest to literacy educators. May be repeated for credit for a total of three credits. Prerequisites: Admission into the Ed.D. program in Literacy Leadership.

RDG 730 <READ 7300> Psychological and Sociological Foundations of Language and Literacy.
Using cognitive-processing, socio-cognitive processing, transactional, transactional-socio-psycho-linguistic, attitude, influence, and critical theories, candidates will explore literacy education. Prerequisites: Admission into the Ed.D. program in Literacy Leadership.

READ 7310 The Politics of Literacy
This course will examine the connections among the pscyhological, sociological, cultural, and political aspects of literacy learning and teaching. Students will develop their own research, community service and/or professional exploration projects, present works-in-progress, and set goals for further development.

RDG 732 <READ 7320> Issues and Trends in Literacy Education.
Current issues and trends related to field of literacy acquisition will be examined through the lens of theory, process and practice. Prerequisites: Admission into the Ed.D. program in Literacy Leadership.

RDG 734 <READ 7340> Literacy for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations.
This course provides a critical examination and implementation of the theories, practices, and assessments related to the teaching of literacy to culturally and linguistically diverse learners. The practicum experiences will help promote sensitivity and appreciation for cultural diversity and instill creative and critical thinking skills necessary for leadership in a multicultural society and global economy. Prerequisites: Admission into the Ed.D. program in Literacy Leadership.

RDG 735 <READ 7336> Strategies for College Reading in Developmental Education.
This course explores research and practical application of reading concepts related to developmental and reading education. Principles of learning, students' reading strategy development, assessment/evaluation of teaching/learning, and the use of instructional technology will be examined using research-based best practices in developmental reading education. Credit 3.

READ 7360 Virtual Ethnography
This course will enrich students' existing qualitative research methodologies by providing them with timely research to overcome the barriers that are inherent in conducting research within digital environments. Students will explore the strategies, methods, issues, possibilities, and technologies for conducting research within digital environments, such as virtual worlds, video games, and social networks, as well as gain the ability to become critical consumers of online and virtual data analysis programs. Prerequisites: READ 7350, READ 7385. Credit 3.

RDG 737 <READ 7370> Quantitative Research Methods in Literacy.
Emphasis is placed on the examination of quantitative research designs and methodologies, the critique of published educational research, the ethical and legal issues of educational research, and the development of a research proposal. Prerequisites: RDG 730 <READ 7300> and permission of the
instructor.

RDG 760 <READ 7345> Analysis, Interpretation, and Dissemination of Literacy Assessment.
This course provides an opportunity to train others in the use and interpretation of literacy assessment instruments. Additionally candidates will assist school sites in establishing a school-wide process for collecting, implementing, and communicating the results of a broad range of assessment data. Prerequisites: RDG 730.

RDG765 Literacy Pedagogy for the Adult Learner.
Issues, research and publications on the methodologies dedicated to the teaching of adults about literacy at the university level, whether in developmental reading or writing classes or enrolled in teacher education classes will be explored. Prerequisite: RDG 730.

RDG 770 <READ 7335> Curriculum Theory & Literacy Education.
This course explores the variety of curriculum perspectives, theories and processes related to the greater issue of literacy and literacy acquisition and the role of literacy leader at local, state, regional and national/international levels. Prerequisites: RDG 730, RDG 732.

RDG 775 <READ 7325> Leadership in Literacy.
Candidates will explore the history of literacy programs, the administration and the supervision of literacy programs PreK-adult at the building, district, state, and federal levels. A significant component of this course will focus on writing for grants and other external funding. Prerequisites: Admission into the Ed.D. program in Literacy Leadership.

RDG 780 <READ 7337> Internship in Literacy Leadership.
This course is the capstone experience for the Ed.D. in Reading that provides opportunities to develop skills in leadership on a school and district level. The candidates will be expected to engage in a minimum of 135 hours of field experiences to conduct research, analyze literacy data, and help in the solution of local, state, and/or national literacy problems. Professional participations and presentations are the vehicles for sharing expertise learned. Prerequisites: Admission into the Ed.D. program in Reading.

RDG 787 <READ 7387> Workshop in Reading.
This course will provide the doctoral student an opportunity to engage in detailed and in-depth study of a program or problem in reading education. The student will work under the supervision of a doctoral faculty member and will be expected to produce a written product or presentation.

RDG 832 <READ 8320> Application of Literacy Research.
Research concepts and tools, and knowledge of the literature will be applied to literacy research problems. Each student will prepare a proposal for the dissertation. Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of 48 required hours toward the Ed.D. Credit 3.

RDG 790 <READ 7350> Qualitative Research Methods in Literacy Education.
This course provides both theoretical and practical dimensions of qualitative research. Various paradigms of qualitative research, such as case study analysis, naturalistic inquiry, discourse analysis, ethnography, and narrative analysis are addressed in this course. Students will engage in data collection, analysis, and reporting of an individualized research project. The research project will enable students to summarize empirical evidence related to psychological, sociological, and linguistic foundations of reading and writing processes and instruction. Students will conduct and publish research and contribute to the development of the knowledge base. Prerequisites: Admission into the Ed.D. program in Literacy Leadership.

RDG 833 <READ 8330> Dissertation in Literacy Education
(Minimum of 9 semester hours total required). This is an individual research course leading to the completion of a dissertation that will contribute new knowledge to the field of reading leadership education. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy in the doctoral program in reading leadership education, and successful completion of comprehensive exam and approval of doctoral advisor.

 


 

SECONDARY EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

SED 533 The Professional Educator's Role.
This course is designed to assist teachers in understanding the structure, organization, and management of public schools. This will include school history, law, diversity, and special populations.

SED 790 <CISE 7390> Assessment of Mathematics Learning.
This course will be one of four education classes used in the doctoral program in mathematics education. Topics will include classroom assessment, standardized tests, and assessment instruments for research in mathematics education.

SED 793 <CISE 7393> Research in Mathematics Education.
This course will be one of four education classes used in the doctoral program in mathematics education. Topics will include selecting a research topic, research instruments, research statistics, and writing the paper.

SED 795 <CISE 7395> Current Issues in Math Education.
This course will be one of four education classes used in the doctoral program in mathematics education. Topics will include curriculum, textbooks, standards, accountability, parental involvement, legal issues, ethics, and testing.

SED 796 <CISE 7396> Theories of Learning Mathematics.
This course will be one of four education classes used in the doctoral program in mathematics education. Topics will include theories of learning mathematics, information processing, cognitive theories, and constructivist theories.


 

SOCIOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

SOCI 5099 Graduate Readings in Sociology
Independent study of subjects not covered in the regular graduate curricula, including independent study of particular value to students needing to pursue a special subject related to thesis. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

SOC 532 <SOCI 5376> Applied Research Methods.
This course studies specialized research methods including evaluation research and social needs assessments for sociology and related social sciences. These methods vary from the more common survey techniques by the nature of the unit of analysis (most often a case study), the types of data collection (interviews, focus groups, and existing data), and the analytical techniques used (more qualitative). Generally, these techniques are applied to the solution of community problems. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

SOC 537 <SOCI 5322> Seminar in Medical Sociology.
This course provides graduate students with the conceptual and substantive knowledge of the field of medical sociology. The course focuses on salient sociological issues in health and medicine, such as the social construction of health and illness, social inequalities in health and health care, medicalization, the health profession, the health care system, and bioethics. Special attention is paid to the roles of social, cultural, and institutional factors in understanding health and health care issues in the United States and in other countries. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. Credit 3.

SOC 543 <SOCI 5414> Social Statistics.
This course focuses upon various statistical techniques used to analyze survey data including descriptive and inferential statistics, cross tabulation, ANOVA, correlation and regression. Lectures, assigned readings and projects are used to describe and illustrate the logic, interpretation, and assumptions of each statistical model. Emphasis is placed upon understanding of the techniques and their assumptions as well as applications. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Credit 4.

SOC 564 <SOCI 5351> Seminar in Environmental Sociology.
This course is designed to provide graduate students a thorough background in the major theoretical perspectives regarding environmental sociology. This background will enable students to view environmental issues from alternative positions and to formulate possible solutions to contemporary environmental problems. The course focuses on the social construction of the environment and on environmental problems and solutions. Credit 3.

SOC 565 <SOCI 5353> Seminar in Race and Ethnic Studies.
In-depth examination and critique of important monographs and journal literature dealing with the social life of American minorities. Designed to promote mature scholarship in the study of literature drawing from influences, ideologies, structural forces and changes characteristic of the social life of comparative minority groups. Students will be responsible for identifying sociological propositions reflected in the discerned patterns of interaction occurring in selected institutions in contemporary American society. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

SOC 567 <SOCI 5312> Seminar in Sociological Research.
This course includes the advanced study of logic, principles, and procedures involving techniques of design data collection and organization, analyses and interpretation for qualitative and quantitative sociological research. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

SOC 568 <SOCI 5378> Techniques of Research Proposal Writing in the Social Sciences.
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a critical under standing of the principal technical and theoretical skills necessary for the development of research projects in the social sciences. Furthermore, it investigates the primary assumptions of qualitative and quantitative research stressing their scopes and limits. Through an examination of the epistemological characteristics of major paradigms in the social sciences, the course illustrates various analytical techniques necessary for the preparation of research proposals. This activity includes techniques for the identification of research questions, the development of justifications, the integration of theories and methods, and the development of analytic designs. This is a course specifically designed for students who would like to be involved in research grant writing and in conducting research. Credit 3.

SOC 572 <SOCI 5331> Sociology of the Family.
This course consists of the study of the family as a social institution. It begins with a traditional functional analysis of the institution and follows with critical and interactionist interpretations. Current changes in the institution using historical and global perspectives constitute the bulk of the course. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

SOC 574 <SOCI 5333> Sociology of Religion.
This course is a study of religion as it operates in society. It examines religious beliefs, religious rituals, group religious experience, and the religious community. Using a cross-cultural perspective, the course investigates the roots of religion in non-industrial societies and follows with an analysis of religion in industrial societies. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

SOC 575 <SOCI 5399> Graduate Readings in Sociology.
Independent study of subjects not covered in the regular graduate curricula, including independent study of particular value to students needing to pursue a special subject related to thesis. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

SOC 576 <SOCI 5320> Sociology of Community.
Advanced study of the organization, structures, groups and interaction pertaining to communities. Attention is given to social forces within communities, patterns of change and the relationship with society. Alternative theoretical perspectives analyzing community are presented along with views on the current conditions and future perspectives of communities in the United States and in other regions of the world. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

SOC 582 <SOCI 5355> Seminar in Social Inequality.
This course studies contemporary class, status and power hierarchies with emphasis on empirical research pertaining to placement in these hierarchies on the basis of birth-achieved statuses such as sex, race, and class origin. Consideration is also given to contemporary and classical sociological theories of social inequality. Credit 3.

SOC 585 <SOCI 5310> Seminar in Sociological Theory.
The course is a historical survey of the most significant 19th and 20th century developments in sociology with emphasis placed on the relevance of classic sociological theory in the formation and development of contemporary sociological theory. The characteristics and origins of major sociological schools are explored including the study of the works and ideas of Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx and Max Weber. Additionally, illustrations of the basic assumptions of Neo-Marxism, Critical Theory, Interactionism, Functionalism and Postmodernism are provided. Accounts of these paradigms are presented together with their theoretical ramifications. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

SOC 587 <SOCI 5337> Gender and Society.
The course focuses on the social construction of gender and provides students a framework for critical thinking concerning gender roles in contemporary U.S. society. The course uses a socio-historical approach to investigate the concept of gender and its relationship to sexuality. Credit 3.

SOC 589 <SOCI 5324> Seminar in Social Change and Development.
A graduate seminar which investigates the origins and modern accounts of the major theories of social change and development. Beginning with the classic works of Marx, Weber and Durkheim, contemporary theories of economic and social development are investigated. Emphasis is placed on various understandings of the concept of development and analyses of the evolution of social change and relations under capitalism. The course will explore Neo-Marxist theories of Dependence, World System and Articulation of Modes of Production along with Neo-Weberian and Modernization theories. Additionally, a review of post-modern critiques of capitalist development is presented. The Seminar will conclude with some observations on the emerging globalization of society and its implications on social and economic institutions. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

SOC 660 <SOCI 6360> Seminar in Sociology.
This seminar is designed to provide an examination and study of substantive areas and/or sociological significant issues not covered in other departmental offerings. Particular attention is on current literature presented in the context of papers and discussion. May be repeated. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

SOC 698 <SOCI 6398> Thesis Practicum.
Students are encouraged to initiate planning and formulation of approved problems in conjunction with course work in Methods and Theory. Credit 3.

SOC 699 <SOCI 6399> Thesis.
The completion and accepted defense of Thesis. The student must be registered in SOC 699 <SOCI 6399> the semester in which the master’s degree is to be completed. Credit 3.


 

SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

SPD 535 <SPED 5301> Education of Individuals with Disabilities.
This course provides an introduction to the strengths and needs of persons with disabilities, with implications for identification and educational programming for regular and special educators. Legislation and case law addressing the rights of individuals with disabilities are discussed.

SPD 537 <SPED 5302> Assessment in Special Education.
This course addresses basic measurement principles, formal and informal assessment, and the connection of assessment to instruction. Students gain experience with diagnostic tools for assessing achievement, social behavior, adaptive behavior, language, and perceptual-motor skills.

SPD 538 <SPED 6308> Practicum and Methods in Special Education.
Students gain direct experience in the use of curriculum, methods, and materials for learners with special needs. Additional topics include assessment, modifications, adaptations, learning strategies, direct instruction and collaboration.

SPD 660 <SPED 6302> Seminar in Autism Spectrum Disorders.
The course provides an overview of autism spectrum disorders, identification and etiology, and research-based programs and services for students identified with disabilities within the spectrum of autism.

SPD 562 <SPED 5303> Study of Cognitive and Low Incidence Disabilities.
This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of the strengths and needs of persons with mental retardation and other low-incidence disabilities. Topics addressed include etiology, family partnerships, educational needs, inclusive programs, and transition issues across the lifespan.

SPD 567 <SPED 6313> Seminar in Learning and Learning Disabilities.
This course presents a study of the research and professional literature concerning persons with learning disabilities and other mild-to-moderate special needs. History, theories of learning, educational practices, social issues, and lifespan needs are addressed.

SPD 568 <SPED 5304> Teaching Methods for Learners with Mild to Moderate Disabilities.
Course content centers upon a rationale for instruction of students with mild to moderate disabilities. Research-based assessment and instructional strategies are presented.

SPD 587 <SPED 6316> Workshop in Education.
The topic(s) included will vary with academic program and semester offered.

SPD 595 <SPED 5305> Individual Assessment of Cognitive Functioning/ Weschsler Scales.
This course is designed to acquaint students with the theory, problems, ethical standards, and techniques of administering individual tests of intelligence. Specifically, each student will learn to administer, score, and interpret the latest edition of the WISC, WAIS, and the WPPSI.

SPD 630 <SPED 6301> Applied Behavior Analysis.
This course presents basic principles, processes, and concepts in Applied Behavior Analysis. К Applied project required.

SPD 631 <SPED 6305> A Study of Behavior Disorders in Children.
This course focuses on theories, characteristics, and instruction for students with mild, moderate, and severe emotional and behavioral disorders. Issues involving definition, classification, and intervention for such disorders as aggression, autism, depression, and delinquency will be addressed.

SPD 633 <SPED 6303> Behavioral Assessment and Intervention.
This course presents an in-depth study of basic principles of Applied Behavior Analysis, behavioral assessment procedures and interventions, and ethical considerations in applied settings. A field-based project is required. Prerequisite: SPD 630

SPD 632 <SPED 6306> Evaluation and Measurement of Behavior.
This course addresses ethical issues in research, single-subject experimental design, descriptive statistics, visual analysis, and interpretation of data. КA research project is required. Prerequisite: SPD 633

SPD 635 <SPED 6304> In-Home Training and Family Issues.
This course addresses the impact of autism and low incidence disabilities on the family, and ways to enable families to assist their child with a disability. Consultation with a family is required.

SPD 637 <SPED 6307> Behavior Change and System Support.
This course presents methods and procedures of Applied Behavior Analysis including antecedent manipulations, consequence manipulations, and teaching functionally equivalent responses. Behavior Analytic methods and curriculum for the education and treatment of children with disabilities will be emphasized. Ethics for behavioral intervention will be presented. Demonstration of behavioral methods and strategies required. Prerequisite: SPD 535 <SPED 5301> or SPD 633

SPD 677 <SPED 6310> Assessment of Young Children and Low-Incidence Populations.
This course provides instruction and practice in administration, scoring, interpretation, and reporting results of individual tests and assessments for young children, individuals with mental retardation, and persons with low-incidence disabilities. Informal techniques such as play-based assessment, portfolio assessment, and contextual assessment are presented. Prerequisites: SPD 537, SPD 595.

SPD 678 <SPED 6311> Seminar in Special Education.
This course prepares students for the role of the educational diagnostician. Topics addressed include special education law, consultation and collaboration, second language learners with special needs, and research-based best practices in special education. Prerequisite: SPD 535.

SPD 679 <SPED 6312> Practicum for Educational Diagnosticians.
This course provides a field-based practicum under the direction of a certified educational diagnostician. It is designed to provide intensive study in the role of the educational diagnostician. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

SPD 682 <SPED 6309> Internship.

Students in the internship develop and implement multiple Behavior Analytic programs in applied settings under the supervision of a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. Prerequisites: SPD 630, 633, 632 and 637.

SPD 698 <SPED 6314> Research Methods in Behavior Analysis.

Students conduct a literature review and develop a Behavior Analytic research proposal according to APA style for their master’s thesis

SPD 699 <SPED 6315> Thesis.
Students collect and analyze experimental data and defend their research thesis. Prerequisites: Admission to Candidacy, SPD 698.

SPD 710 Doctoral Seminar in Special Education.
Candidates will demonstrate their knowledge of real problems and needs in both national and local special education programs and policies. Identification of existing research problems and an action plan for implementation will be required. This requirement is taken in a sequence of three one-semester hour courses.**

SPD 731 Legal Issues and Policies in Special Education.
This course examines the major laws and policies affecting individuals with disabilities, Legal, ethical, and policy implications of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504, and No Child Left Behind are addressed. The current body of research in legal issues also is emphasized. Prerequisites: Admission to the Ed.D. Program in Special Education.**

SPD 733 <SPED 7301> Instructional Practices in Special Education.
Course content examines research-based programs and practices in academics, literacy, math, and behavior which is designed to document student learning under conditions of intensive, research-based instruction, including universal design. Response to Intervention programs will be included as part of a directed effort to meet the educational needs of students at a pre-referral phase. Family partnerships and collaboration with internal and external stakeholders are emphasized. Research-based practices in promoting student self-determination and independent functioning are emphasized. Prerequisite: SPD 731**.

SPD 734 Functional and Curriculum-based Assessment in Special Education.
Research and practice in the dynamics and critical decisions involving functional and curriculum-based assessment systems are covered. The relationship between interventions and assessment findings will be focused upon in both academic and behavioral contexts. Candidates will demonstrate proficiency in creating high quality Individualized Educational Programs (IEP) and Behavioral Support Plans (BSP). Prerequisite: SPD 731.**

SPD 735 Program Evaluation in Special Education.
Course content will be devoted to the evaluation of the learning environments that foster student engagement and academic success, prevention of behavior problems, and recognition of diversity. Examination of theories, models, issues, and practices in conducting evaluations of special education programs will be emphasized. The promotion of continuous improvement of school programs and services along with lifelong professional growth for educators are designated course outcomes. School wide reform processes and procedures will be presented. Prerequisites: SPD 730.**

SPD 736 Personnel Preparation and Collaboration in Special Educators.
The content and experiences provided in this course are directed toward the preparation and ongoing professional development of special education personnel in varied roles. Candidates will examine and apply practices and competencies that support and promote ethical and professional behaviors and value continuing professional growth and development. SPD 730.**

SPD 738 Small N Designs in Educational Research.
This course addresses the rationale, logic, and methodology of single subject and small n research designs. Students will practice graphing data and conducting visual analysis. Students will read original research demonstrating single subject designs and will prepare research proposals using small N research designs. Prerequisites: SPD 731.**

SPANISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

SPN 531 <SPAN 5331> Seminar in Comparative Spanish Art and Culture.
This course provides an in-depth comparison of the arts, visual, aural and/or cultural representations, across the Hispanic world. Topics vary from semester to semester.  This course intends to foster student development in Spanish language ability and cultural consciousness.

SPN 532 <SPAN 5332> Spanish Golden Age Literature.
This course is an in-depth study of the Spanish Golden Age (1500-1700), including authors, works, the concepts of Renaissance, Baroque, Picaresque, poetry, comedies written by Tirso de Molina, Lope de Vega and Calderón de la Barca. The materials are read and discussed in Spanish.

SPN 533 <SPAN 5333> Spanish American Literature: Pre-European to Independence.
This course concentrates on the literary cultures of Spanish America from the Colonial to the Post-Colonial period (end of the 19th century). Study is focused on national literatures, cultural backgrounds, ethnic, linguistic and identity issues. Reading and discussions are in Spanish.

SPN 534 <SPAN 5334> Contemporary Spanish American Literature.
This course focuses on the literary expressions of various Hispanic cultures during the 20th century and beyond including the Latino, a population of the USA, by either focusing on an author, a theme, an artistic/literary genre or contemporary social and political issues. Readings and discussions are in Spanish.

SPN 536 <SPAN 5336> Hispanic Women’s Studies.
The graduate student will develop an expanded familiarity with, an appreciation for, and an ability to interpret, evaluate, and write scholarly essays about Hispanic women’s literature and art.

SPN 537 <SPAN 5337> Literature Analysis and Research Methods.
This course fosters the development of enhanced literary consciousness and capability. Via selected readings and discussion, the student will develop a familiarity with, an appreciation for, and an ability to interpret and evaluate Hispanic literature. More specifically they will develop critical skills in analyses and interpretations leading to conducting independent research and writing for both scholarly presentations and publications.

SPN 538 <SPAN 5338> Second Language Teaching Methodology.
This course addresses second language acquisition theories and their relationship to effective approaches of teaching language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) to foreign language learners. Additional emphasis is given to the evaluation of proficiency competencies based on state and federal guidelines. Discussions and assignments are conducted in Spanish.

SPN 570 <SPAN 5370> History of the Spanish Language.
This course outlines the history of the Spanish language over the last two millennia, focusing on the formal development of its phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics.

SPN 571 <SPAN 5371> Contemporary Spanish Literature.
This course is an in-depth study of the major authors, works (including films), and aesthetic currents of the Spanish literature beginning with the 20th century.  Texts are studied from a variety of theoretical approaches. Readings and discussions are in Spanish.

SPN 572 <SPAN 5372> Spanish for Technical Composition.
This course focuses on forms of exposition, including narration, to develop students’ competency to write clear and effective technical prose for various professions including health, law, criminal justice, education, science, technology, literature and business. Readings and discussions are in Spanish.

SPN 573 <SPAN 5373> Theories and Practices of Translation and Interpretation.
This course will train students in the cognitive processes and language skills required to translate and interpret written or audiovisual texts. Discussions and assignments are in Spanish and in English.

SPN 574 <SPAN 5374> Studies in Spanish Linguistics.
This course provides a detailed description of the phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics of the Spanish language. Related topics such as language variation and bilingualism in the United States are also discussed.

 


 

STATISTICS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

STA 511 <STAT 5111> Software for Statistical Sciences.
Topics include MINITAB, SAS, Maple and Scientific Workplace (or equivalents). This one-hour course is available for graduate students in all disciplines. Prerequisites: STA 380 (or equivalent), graduate standing and consent of instructor. Credit 1.

STA 533 <STAT 5333> Design and Analysis of Experiments.
Topics include the design, analysis and interpretation of results from standard experimental design models including the completely randomized design, the randomized complete block, the incomplete block, factorial models, Latin squares, Greco-Latin squares, screening designs, fractional factorials, and general fixed, mixed and random effects ANOVA models. Prerequisites: STA 472 (or equivalent). Credit 3.

STA 560 <STAT 5360> Special Topics in Statistics.
Topics and courses are selected to suit individual student needs. Methods of independent study and research are stressed. Such topics as stochastic processes, Markov chain models, game theory, remote sensing, statistical decision theory, time series analysis and pattern recognition may be included. Also listed as MTH 560. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Credit 3.

STA 561 <STAT 5361> Theory and Applications of Probability. Topics include probability axioms and properties, conditional probability, random variables, probability distributions, moment generating functions, laws of large numbers and the Central Limit Theorem. Also listed as MTH 561. Prerequisites: STA 472 (or equivalent) or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

STA 562 <STAT 5362> Theory and Applications of Statistics.
Topics include point estimation, hypothesis testing, interval estimation, nonparametric statistics, regression, correlation, analysis of variance, robustness and model fitting. Prerequisites: STA 561 <STAT 5361> (or equivalent). Credit 3.

STA 564 <STAT 5364> Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis.
Topics include the multivariate normal distribution, inferences about a mean vector, comparisons of several multivariate means, principal components analysis, clustering, discriminant and classification analysis. Prerequisites: STA 472 and MTH 668, or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

STA 565 <STAT 5365> Linear Statistical Models.
Topics include the statistical properties of quadratic forms, the full-rank general linear statistical model, the less-than-full-rank model, the linear model structure of regression models, ANOVA models, ANCOVA models, the general characteristics of the fixed, mixed and random effects models and model diagnostics considerations. Prerequisites: STA 472 or STA 562 <STAT 5362> (or equivalents). Credit 3.

STA 566 <STAT 5366> Sampling Methods.
Topics include the theory and applications of standard methods for performing scientific-based sampling. Among these are simple random sampling, cluster sampling, stratified random sampling, systematic sampling, probability proportional to size (pps) sampling, sampling from finite populations and ratio regression estimation. Prerequisite: STA 472, STA 562, or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

STA 567 <STAT 5367> Reliability Analysis and Quality Control.
Topics include measures of failure, reliability functions, failure models, life testing and censoring, system reliability, parameter estimation and testing, control charting, acceptance sampling plans, software reliability and process control. Prerequisites: STA 472, STA 562, or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

STA 568 <STAT 5368> Regression Modeling and Analysis.
Topics include model estimation and testing, simple and multiple regression models, residual analysis, variables selection, polynomial regression, multicollinearity, ridge regression, logistic regression and real data analysis and applications. Prerequisites: STA 472, STA 562, or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

STA 569 <STAT 5369> Statistical Computing and Consulting.
This course consists of a detailed study of the SAS package including SAS/BASICS, SAS/STAT, SAS/GRAPH and SAS/IML with emphasis on applying these tools in a consulting environment. Techniques and principles important in working with representatives of user disciplines are included. Prerequisites: STA 380 and graduate standing. Credit 3.

STA 570 <STAT 5370> Nonparametric Statistics.
Topics include order statistics, contingency analysis, rank tests (Wilcoxin signed-rank test, Mann-Whitney U test and others), distribution- free tests of location and scale, Kendall’s tau and related areas. Prerequisites: STA 472, STA 562, or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

STA 698 <STAT 6398> Research and Thesis.
This course includes a study of research methods in statistics, identification of an appropriate thesis problem and the preparatory work leading to a plan for its solution. Study must be supervised by a member of the graduate statistics faculty. Prerequisite: STA 562. Credit 3.

STA 699 <STAT 6399> Research and Thesis.
This course continues the thesis research and concludes with a carefully written solution of the thesis problem and a satisfactory oral presentation of the results. Study must be supervised by a member of the graduate statistics faculty. Prerequisite: STA 698. Credit 3.

STA 765 <STAT 7365> Statistical Methods for Decision Making.
Topics covered are oriented toward statistical methods supporting the decision environment. Topics include estimation, hypothesis testing, statistical modeling and decision methods. Prerequisite: 3 credit hour of graduate-level, introductory probability and statistics or the equivalent. Credit 3.


 

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