Workshops

SESSION I: 10:40 AM–11:30 AM

Accept yourself before you wreck yourself
Presented by Robin Cloud
Location: LSC 307

Have you ever thought about what your life would be like if you had the courage to follow that voice inside you? Gay or straight, coming out to the world in a way that reveals your authentic self is the greatest act of courage. Combining humor and her own personal experience, Cloud explores the power and freedom that she gained when she bravely came out of the closet as a teenager. This program aims to educate and enlighten audience members on the LGBTQ experience and inspire individuals to transform their fears into acts of courage.

No, I am not a terrorist!
Presented by Zohra Sarwari
Location: LSC 320

Are all Muslims terrorist? What does Islam say about “terrorism”? What is behind the veil? This is a golden opportunity to change the way you think about Muslims and other religions. Over 50% of Americans have no basic understanding of the Muslim faith, which causes discrimination and intolerance on campuses. Using humor and personal experiences, Zohra educates others about diversity. Her programs promote dialogue and foster tolerance towards people of all races, religions and backgrounds, regardless how tough and sensitive the subject matter.

From the Streets to the Stage!
Presented by Monti Washington
Location: LSC 304

This is an interactive presentation, designed to help students gain the problem solving skils needed to be successful, both inside and outside of the classroom. Through crowd participation, story telling, and poetry, students will be engaged, encouraged, and empowered to make it from the streets of their minds, to the stage of their dreams.

Student Activism: History in Context
Presented by Dr. Pamela Gray, Dr. Paul Eaton, Dr. Ric Montelongo
Location: LSC 315

Student activism has become commonplace on college campuses throughout the U.S., yet many students are unaware of the activist history that precedes today’s advocacy agendas. This workshop will provide a historical context for current student activism. Students will learn how marginalized groups have historically advocated for social justice on college campuses. Following this session, students will be able to:

  1. Understand the roles of Latina/o organizations on college campuses;
  2. Describe how African American sororities and fraternities impacted the civil rights movements;
  3. Identify ways LGBTQ advocates have worked to create inclusive campus environments.
  4. Recognize how these groups have collaborated on activism goals in the past.
The “REAL” Impact of Hunger
Presented by Dr. Lora Helvie-Mason and Mitsy Smith
Location: LSC 302

Food insecurity is becoming a prevalent issue on college campuses nationally. As costs of higher education expenses continue to rise, students’ budget demands compete with food money. Food instability can impede academic success, engagement, and successful matriculation to graduation.

The goal of this presentation is to create awareness about the impact of food instability on college campuses while noting options that can be taken to impact our communities in positive ways.

The audience will participate in value-driven activity designed to manage decisions and resources that will allow a deeper understanding of food insecurity and its impact, especially on students. Attendees in this session will gain knowledge about the reality and struggle of food insecurity.

The presenters founded a food pantry at their university and continue to facilitate its on-going growth and development.

SESSION II: 11:40 AM–12:30 PM

Accept yourself before you wreck yourself
Presented by Robin Cloud
Location: LSC 307

Have you ever thought about what your life would be like if you had the courage to follow that voice inside you? Gay or straight, coming out to the world in a way that reveals your authentic self is the greatest act of courage. Combining humor and her own personal experience, Cloud explores the power and freedom that she gained when she bravely came out of the closet as a teenager. This program aims to educate and enlighten audience members on the LGBTQ experience and inspire individuals to transform their fears into acts of courage.

No, I am not a terrorist!
Presented by Zohra Sarwari
Location: LSC 320

Are all Muslims terrorist? What does Islam say about “terrorism”? What is behind the veil? This is a golden opportunity to change the way you think about Muslims and other religions. Over 50% of Americans have no basic understanding of the Muslim faith, which causes discrimination and intolerance on campuses. Using humor and personal experiences, Zohra educates others about diversity. Her programs promote dialogue and foster tolerance towards people of all races, religions and backgrounds, regardless how tough and sensitive the subject matter.

Exploring Student Activism Today
Presented by Dr. Pamela Gray, Dr. Paul Eaton, Dr. Ric Montelongo
Location: LSC 315

This workshop will explore the many ways current college students are becoming activist-leaders in their campus, local, national, and international communities. Following this sessions, students will be able to:

  1. Understand the many facets of today’s campus student activism;
  2. Articulate specific ways to build coalitions and-or networks;
  3. Identify tools to enhance organization, leadership development, and networking of activists.

We will begin by dissecting what it means to be a student activist, followed by brainstorming ideas for networking, and end with sharing resources helpful to students (including social media/digital).

How Culturally Responsive and Inclusive is your Campus?
Presented by Dr. Rebecca Bustamante
Location: LSC 306

In this workshop, student leaders will be introduced to the use of culture audits as a tool for assessing how responsive a campus culture is in meeting the needs and experiences of various culture groups. Student leaders will learn how to conduct culture audits and use this data to initiate campus change initiatives that lead to more inclusive campus environments.

What is social justice and why is it important to you?
Presented by Kelli Arena and Jesse Starkey.
Location: LSC 304

From the classroom to the boardroom, social justice is the new buzzphrase. But in some quarters, the term ignites great controversy. What is social justice, how does it fit into society today? What role does it play in leadership? How does it promote a more diverse, and multi-cultural society?

Men of color: Under the Radar at PWI’s and their Need for Mentors
Presented by Dr. Griselda Flores and Dr. Yuleinys Castillo
Location: LSC 321

The audience will learn about the preexisting gender gap that exists in higher education concerning graduation rates for males versus their female counterparts. While the gender gap in higher education exists across all racial groups (Saenz & Ponjuan, 2009), a resilient trend among Latino males is often ignored when compared to their African American counterparts. Nonetheless, the need for both groups to receive additional guidance and mentorship within the respective institution is critical for the well-being of this country. Therefore, in this session, faculty and staff will become more knowledgeable of ways to assist and support men of color through effective mentorship relationships (Santors & Reigadas, 2002). Students (regardless of gender) will gain valuable information on different ways they can find a mentor on campus and strategic ways to get the most out of these relationships.

SESSION III: 2:00 PM – 2:50 PM

Whiteness and Campus Leadership: Opportunities for Critical Reflection
Presented by Dr. Rebecca Bustamante and Dr. Paul Eaton.
Location: LSC 302

Many of us white campus leaders consider ourselves diversity conscious, well-meaning advocates or allies. Often times, however, we are unaware of how our dominant group status influences our behaviors as leaders and is perceived by non-white others. When we do become aware, defensiveness, shame, anger, guilt or denial in the form of colorblindness most often emerge. These emotions shut us down and are not helpful in promoting social justice efforts. Through critical reflection and dialogue, we can move through these inevitable emotions and grow to be more effective diversity leaders. By participating in this presentation, student leaders will practice engaging in critical self-reflection and dialogue to enhance their understanding of whiteness in leadership. With this knowledge, white student leaders will be more conscious of how their attitudes and behaviors might impact systemic inequities and people of color. Student leaders of all races and intersections are welcome to participate in these critical dialogues.

Pursuing MENtal Freedom – Personal Development in a Men of Color Mentoring Program at a PWI.
Presented by Dr. Lori Helvie-Mason, D’Ante Phillips, Jose Lopez, Traivohn Jefferson, James Smith, Marc Martinez, Andre McQuitty, Joel Leach II, Omar Wyatt and Gilson Umunnakwe.
Location: LSC 306

Campus climate and engagement have an impact on student success. This panel provides a contextualized exploration of the experiences, impact, and development of members of a mentoring program for men of color at a Predominantly White Institution (PWI).

This presentation explores “mental freedom” through the experiences of the panelists. As the men share their journeys in the Tarleton MENtal freedom program, the audience will reflect on two key features through an interactive activity. In the activity, participants identify barriers to “mental freedom” by exploring what words, voices, and experiences may be clouding their growth. Secondly, they’ll strategize how to overcome those obstacles through a “keep, start, stop” activity.

Attendees in this session will hear powerful journeys from men who not only pursue mental freedom, but hold one another accountable through a peer networking system. The presenters have layered approaches to considering self-perception, preparation, and growth in a shifting campus climate.

How Stereotypes Affect Leadership Style?
Presented by Kalyn Cavazos and Alondra Garza
Location: LSC 315

Stereotypes are prevalent in today’s society and can influence workplace goals, team morale, and personal motivation. This session will have a hands-on activity that will allow participants to explore their own identity and dispel any rumors or stereotypes that may exist for them. Facilitators will highlight how stereotypes can affect leadership styles and how to deal with those trails in life. After this session, participants will be able to challenge stereotypes and apply tips to real-world situations.

What they didn’t tell you in school: Advice from Women in Leadership          
Presented by Cassandra Boyd, Amber Moore, Ericka Landry and Ericka Herrera
Location: LSC 321

Who runs the world? Women. This popular lyric from pop singer, Beyoncé addresses an interesting question for women in the 21st century. This presentation will discuss the top qualities of women in leadership according to an academic study. Participants will be able to compare these qualities to their own leadership style. Plus, students will learn who the most successful world women leaders are and what they are doing to run the world.

Know Yourself, Know Your Words
Presented by Delta Xi Nu Multicultural Sorority, Inc.
Location: LSC 319

After this presentation, attendees will have an understanding of the true meaning and background of words and the effect they have to and from society.