Mountain Warfare

ROTC Mountain Warfare

Throughout the course of history, armies have been significantly affected by the requirement to fight in the   mountains. With approximately 38 percent of the world’s landmass classified as mountains, the Army must be prepared to deter conflicts, resist coercion, and defeat aggression in mountains as in other areas.

  • The purpose of the SQI "E" Course, Military Mountaineer, is to train soldiers in the specialized skills required for operating in mountainous terrain, under all climatic conditions, day and night.
  • These courses teach soldiers how to use adverse terrain and weather conditions to their advantage as a combat multiplier. This aids in preserving the unit strength and combat power to achieve mission success.
  • Our ultimate objective is to teach MOBILITY.

ROTC Mountain Warfare

071-SQIE (SUM) Basic Military Mountaineer Summer Course

The course is 14 days of continuous training, with an average of 14 hours of training every day. The emphasis during the course is on practical, realistic, and strenuous hands-on skills which are consistent with current Army doctrine. At times the physical condition of the student approaches exhaustion. During the course, the student becomes increasingly proficient in the fundamentals, principles, and techniques of conducting small unit operations in mountainous terrain.

The Army Mountain Warfare School teaches a TRADOC approved course of instruction in basic Military Mountaineering. After completion of both Level 1 Courses, soldiers are awarded the SQI "E", Military Mountaineer IAW DA Pam 611-21. Emphasis is placed on developing the Level 1 Basic Mountaineer tasks described in Chapter 2, FM 3-97.6 Mountain Operations (2000 Revision).

071-F1 (SUM) Assault Climber Course

The course is 14 days of continuous training, with an average of 14 hours of training every day. To train selected soldiers in the knowledge/skills required to lead small units/teams over technically difficult, hazardous or exposed (Class 4 and 5) mountainous terrain during summermonths. Emphasis is placed on developing the Level 2 Assault Climber tasks described in Chapter 2, FM 3-97.6, Mountain Operations (2000 Revision).

ROTC Mountain Warfare

071-F1 (WIN) Assault Climber Course

The course is 14 days of continuous training, with an average of 14 hours of training every day. To train selected soldiers in the knowledge/skills required to lead small units/teams over technically difficult, hazardous or exposed (Class 4 and 5) mountainous terrain during winter months. Emphasis is placed on developing the Level 2 Assault Climber tasks described in Chapter 2, FM 3-97.6, Mountain Operations (2000 Revision).

 

The Army Mountain Warfare School also conducts Mobile Training Teams (MTTs) for unit/mission specific training. This training covers the broad range of summer and winter basic and advanced military mountaineering and is tailored to the requesting unit's needs. Cost of the MTT/UTP is at the requesting unit' expense and can be at our location, the unit's location or another site suitable for the training. Details on length of the MTT and the subjects covered can be coordinated via phone or through the email link listed in the Point of Contact section.

ROTC Mountain Warfare

Cadre Accomplishments

Austrian Mountain School

Norwegian Winter Warfare School

Swiss Mountain School

Swiss Army Advanced Avalanche Course

Rigging for Rescue Course

Canadian Law Enforcement Tactical Rope Rescue Course

Ranger, Sapper, Sniper, Airborne, Air Assault, and Combatives courses

Operators Emergency Medical School, Wilderness Advanced Life Support, Wilderness Emergency Medical Technician

Ecuadorian Mountain School

Australian Mountain School

USMC Mountain Leader Course

USMC Instructor Qualification Course

American Mountain Guides Association (AMGA) Rock Certification

AMGA Guide training courses in the Rock, Alpine, and Ski disciplines

American Avalanche Institute Level 3 Mountain Guide

Mt. Everest (highest peak in world) (American record in winter)

Chogolisa, Pakistan

Personal summits of Mt. McKinley (highest peak in North America), Aconcagua (hightest peak in South America), and several peaks over 18,000ft in Peru and Equador

Personal multi-day technical ascents of ice, alpine, and bigwall rock routes

Rock and alpine mountaineering experience all over the United States, as well as Argentina, Scotland, Belgium, Kyrgyzstan, Spain, Germany, Austria, Italy, Nepal, and the Canadian Rockies

Former cadre expeditions to Mt. McKinley, Mt. Chogolisa (Pakistan), Mt. Sanford, AK (Joint US & Canadian Expediton), Mt. Logan (Yukon Territory), and Mt. Mana, India (Joint Indo-US expediton)

Several Expert Alpine and Nordic skiers

Permanent members of the International Association of Military Mountain Schools (IAMMS)

Mobile training teams sent throughout Central Asia

Mobile training team to Afganistan in support of OEF

Over 20 years of training support for the Army's only Mountain Infantry Battalion

Polar Ice Cap, Greenland

ECO Challenge 2000

Armed Forces ECO Challenge

ROTC Mountain Warfare

CWOC - Cold Weather Orientation Course

Scope. This course familiarizes commanders and staff officers with the knowledge/skills required in successfully planning and conducting operations in a cold, snow-covered environment. Emphasis is placed on the effects of cold on personnel and material, effects of the winter environment on operations, and planning considerations unique to the winter battlefield and cold regions. Cold weather risk management procedures are stressed throughout the course of instruction.

CWLC - Cold Weather Leaders Course

Scope. This course trains squad and platoon level leaders in the knowledge/skills required to successfully conduct small unit operations in a cold, snow-covered environment. Emphasis is placed on the effects of cold on personnel and materiel, use of basic cold weather clothing and equipment, winter field craft, snowshoe/ski techniques, and winter/cold regions navigation and route planning. Attendees will receive comprehensive instruction/training materials enabling them to implement basic, cold-weather and ski-training programs within their units. Cold weather risk-management procedures are stressed throughout the course.

BMC - Basic Mountaineering Course

Scope. To train selected soldiers in the fundamental knowledge/skills required to successfully conduct small unit operations in typical, mountainous terrain found throughout the world. Emphasis is placed on developing the Level 1 mountaineering tasks described in FM 3-97.61, Appendix A.

ACC - Assault Climbers Course

Scope. To train selected soldiers in the knowledge/skills required to lead small units/teams over technically difficult, hazardous or exposed (Class 4 and 5) mountainous terrain during summer months. Emphasis is placed on developing the Level 2 mountaineering tasks described in Chapter 2, FM 3-97.6, Mountain Operations (1999 Revision) and FM 3-97.61, Military mountaineering. The course is intended for units or individuals that will conduct operations in mountainous terrain and must operate independently of major units or organizations or will lead larger organizations over technically hazardous terrain.

ALIT - Arctic Light Individual Training

a. Course Purpose. To train all Soldiers, regardless of job function, in the skills required to successfully train and operate in a cold, snow-covered environment. Attendees will gain confidence in their cold weather clothing and equipment and their ability to care for themselves in the cold weather environment.

b. Course Scope. Emphasis is placed on the effects of cold on personnel and material, recognition, treatment and prevention of cold weather injuries, use of basic cold weather clothing and equipment, winter field-craft, use of cold weather shelters, use of Army approved heaters, and over snow movement techniques. Cold weather risk management procedures are stressed throughout the course of instruction.

 

 


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