A KEY TO THE SKULLS

OF

NORTH AMERICAN MAMMALS

THIRD EDITION

Bryan P. Glass

Department of Zoology

Oklahoma State University

Stillwater, Oklahoma

and

Monte L. Thies

Department of Biological Sciences

Sam Houston State University

Huntsville, Texas

 

 

Copyright 1997 by Bryan P. Glass and Monte L. Thies

All rights reserved. No portion of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any other information storage and retrieval system, without explicit, prior written permission from the authors.

INTRODUCTION

SAMPLE CHAPTER

ORDERING INFORMATION

 

INTRODUCTION TO THE THIRD EDITION

Since its introduction, many people have used this manual as both a reference and tool for working in and teaching mammalogy. However, it has not been available in recent years, having gone out of print. Copies of the second edition are increasingly difficult to locate and those in existence now contain out-of-date information.  These facts point to the desirability of a third edition, a possibility suggested on a number of occasions by colleagues and past users of the book. Our intention, with the development of this edition, is to provide a comprehensive treatment of all mammal genera, both native and introduced, occurring in North America north of Mexico, inclusive of marine mammals found in coastal waters.

Primary changes to this edition include a reorganization and update of taxonomy following D. E. Wilson and D. M. Reeder’s Mammal species of the world: A taxonomic and geographic reference and additional works following its publication in 1993. Several additional exotic genera known to (or potentially) occur in the wild have also been incorporated. As an aid to the user, exotic genera are identified by asterisks in the text and on figure captions. It should also be noted that several of these genera (i.e. Mus and Rattus) are widespread in distribution and locally abundant whereas others, such as Erinaceus, Meriones, Cricetus, and Mesocricetus, may not actually exist in the wild. Old figures have been replaced with line drawings, each including dorsal, ventral, and lateral views of all genera included in the key. As with previous editions, many sources have been drawn upon for both factual and illustrative purposes. Although far from comprehensive, the Selected References section has also been updated to include material used in updating this key, as well as additional books and sources of interest to both the professional and amateur.

Primary changes to the third edition include:

Order Didelphimorphia - renaming of Order Marsupialia
Order Insectivora - addition of the exotic genus Erinaceus; reduction of Microsorex to a subgenus of Sorex
Order Chiroptera - addition of Molossus; Nyctinomops split from Tadarida; Idionycteris split from Corynorhynus, which has been renamed from Plecotus
Order Carnivora - merging of Orders Carnivora and Pinnipedia into single Order Carnivora; division of felid genera Felis and Lynx into Puma, Panthera, Lynx, Herpailurus, Leopardus, and Felis; addition of the domestic cat in genus Felis; Thalarctos reduced to a subgenus of Ursus; Lutra renamed Lontra
Order Cetacea - Lagenorhynchus renamed as Peponocephala
Order Artiodactyla - addition of Camelus and Lama in Family Camelidae; change of Tayassu to Pecari; Bison synonomized with Bos
Order Rodentia - Eutamias reduced to a subgenus of Tamias; Chaetodipus elevated as separate genus from Perognathus; Family Cricetidae combined into Muridae; addition of exotic genera Meriones, Cricetus, and Mesocricetus; Podomys elevated to a separate genus from Peromyscus
Order Lagomorpha - addition of domestic rabbit, genus Oryctolagus; Brachylagus elevated to a distinct genus from Sylvilagus

 

Special thanks are due to Kathleen Thies, William Caire, University of Central Oklahoma, George Baumgardner, Texas A & M University, Tracey Carter, Oklahoma State University, and Joe and Nancy Green, Comanche Spring Ranch, for aid in developing this edition, critical review of the manuscript, and the loan or provision of specimens; Jeremy Jacobs and Diane Nordeck, National Museum of Natural History, for provision of photographic material; and the Sam Houston State University Faculty Enhancement Program for partial funding.

 

SAMPLE CHAPTER - LAGOMORPHA

 

1. -Supraorbital processes absent; jugal projecting back almost to auditory
     meatus, forming a long spine; fenestrae on side of rostrum not covered
     with bony latticework; dental formula I2/1 C0/0 P3/2 M2/3.....Ochotonidae.....Ochotona (Fig. 174)
    -Supraorbital processes present, divided into antorbital and postorbital
     portions; jugal extending only approximately halfway to auditory meatus;
     fenestrae in side of rostrum covered by bony latticework; dental formula
     I2/1 C0/0 P3/2 M3/3.................................................Leporidae..........................................................2

2. -Interparietal absent in adults; supraorbital processes broadly triangular
     and winglike...............................................................................................................Lepus (Fig. 175)
    -Interparietal distinct in adults; supraorbital processes narrower and
     more strap-shaped..............................................................................................................................3

3. -Supraorbital processes slender and rodlike, usually standing free from
     cranium; auditory bullae proportionately very large; anterior upper and
     lower premolar with only one fold in the enamel...........................................Brachylagus (Fig. 176)
    -Supraorbital processes straplike, frequently touching or even fusing
     with cranium; auditory bullae proportionately much smaller; anterior
     upper and lower premolar with more than one fold; reentrant enamel crenate..............................4

4. -Interparietal rectangular in outline..............................................................Oryctolagus* (Fig. 177)
    -Interparietal triangular in outline......................................................................Sylvilagus (Fig. 178)
 
 

Description: F:\Web files\Ocho.jpg

 Fig. 174.  Ochotona
Greatest length of skull 40mm

 

Description: F:\Web files\Lag.jpg
Fig. 175.  Lepus
Greatest length of skull 95mm

Description: F:\Web files\Brach.jpg
Fig. 176.  Brachylagus
Greatest length of skull 50mm

Description: F:\Web files\Oryct.jpg
Fig. 177.  Oryctolagus*
Greatest length of skull 80mm

Description: F:\Web files\Sylv.jpg
Fig. 178.  Sylvilagus
Greatest length of skull 70mm

 

ORDERING INFORMATION

Copies of the third edition of "A key to the skulls of North American mammals" are available through me at the Sam Houston State University Department of Biological Sciences for $15 per copy plus $2 per copy for shipping and handling for orders placed within the United States. For international orders, check with me via e-mail before placing an order. I'll check on postage rates and any US Customs fees for shipment to your destination.

The best method for obtaining copies is to order from me at the address below and to make payment with a personal check or University Purchase Voucher made out directly to me (not to the University). If an individual's purchasing department (if you want to go that route) will not cut checks for prepayment, I will accept a "payment on receipt of order". Unfortunately, I cannot accept a credit card for payment.

Thank you for your interest.

Sincerely,

Dr. Monte L. Thies

Professor of Biology

Department of Biological Sciences

Box 2116

Sam Houston State University

Huntsville, TX  77341

e-mail: BIO_MLT@SHSU.EDU

Voice: (936)294-3746

FAX: (936)294-3940